dulfersitz

dulfersitz

Rumney, NH

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dulfersitz

dulfersitz wrote a review of on September 23, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I gave it as a gift, but have feedback to share

Bluewater has a good discussion on their FAQ about middle markers. They recommend any non-solvent based marker, particularly Sharpie's Rub-A-Dub laundry pen (which you can get for $2 on Amazon).

http://www.bluewaterropes.com/ and click on FAQs at top. Here's what they say:

"Marking pens are fine to use on ropes as long as they are water based laundry markers. Years ago solvent based markers were the norm. Some of the solvents used in these old pens could reduce the strength of the sheath strands marked. These days most pens are water based so this is not as much of an issue as in years passed. We recommend a Sharpie 'rub a dub' laundry marking pen."

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dulfersitz

dulfersitz wrote a review of on July 17, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I put Thule Aeroblade load bars on my 1998 Honda CRV (the rack is probably worth more than my car...). No wind noise at all. The fit kit works perfectly. Just some rubber pads to make the Thule Foot mesh with your car. Really strong fit.

Bring a measuring tape and a friend with you to install. Also, some masking tape to temporarily mark places on the roof would be helpful. You're supposed to position the bars and feet at specific places on the car, as measured from the top of the windshield. Works best if you have a measuring tape that won't scratch your car...

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dulfersitz

dulfersitz wrote an answer about on June 21, 2013

Directly from Matt at Sterling:

It is ok to use as a Prusik as long as the diameter of the host rope is large enough for the PowerCord to synch down. Generally speaking, PowerCord is too stiff for use as a Prusik so, it won't work well enough on small diameter ropes but, larger diameter stuff it should work fine.

Heat is not a problem for Technora in this application. Typical Nylon melts around 400 degrees F and the Technora degrades around 900 degrees.

While tight radius bends should be avoided with higher modulus materials like Technora it is not really a strength concern as a Prusik since the Prusik generally slips on the host rope well ahead of the break strength.

Matt Andrews
Climbing & Outdoor Market Manager
Sterling Rope Co., Inc.

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dulfersitz

dulfersitz wrote a review of on January 10, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have been on a quest for the perfect winter mid-layer. I bought six candidates from Backcountry on Thanksgiving, and returned all of them but this guy. The lofty fleece keeps me warm like sun on a Mexican beach (Corona not included).

I've worn this jacket around the city, on the slopes, and to the crags.

Pros: Good on its own down to 35-40 degrees (with long-sleeve shirt underneath). I pair it with a down jacket for colder temps. It does not block wind, so wear under a down jacket or hardshell if that's a concern. Packs well.

Cons: No hood. Short in torso.

Other: No wind protection (but would make it less packable, so okay trade-off in my book).

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dulfersitz

dulfersitz wrote an answer about on October 13, 2011

I think a haul bag would be overkill if what you really want is a rope bag. You'd have to haul this up after you jumar (you wouldn't want to jumar with it on your back). If you use a rope bag or backpack, you could probably jumar while wearing it, and save yourself the extra step of hauling.

You might check out:

http://www.backcountry.com/store/review/200111302/Great-multi-pitch-pack.html

http://www.backcountry.com/mad-rock-rope-pod

Or longer list at: http://www.indoorclimbing.com/rope_bags.html

I personally use a pair of Ikea shopping bags. They're light, durable, and cheap.

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/17228340/

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dulfersitz

dulfersitz wrote a review of on October 12, 2011

5 5

Biners are biners, right? I would have said so a few years ago. But my Petzl biners have held up much better than others from black diamond, camp, and wild country. The gate on one of my BD's sticks open. My camps have rope grooves from being demoted to anchor duty. But my petzls feel and look brand new.

I also like that the nylon dogbone on this draw is burly enough to leave it up on a route for a few weeks without the UV rays & rain degrading its strength. I'm sure it's all in my head, but I try to avoid leaving my BDs / wild countrys with their dyneema dogbones in the sun for days.

Pros: I like the longevity, the clipping action, and the durability of the dogbone
Cons: heavier and bulkier, 2x more expensive
Best uses: sport climbing
Don't use this for: trad, or if you're counting ounces

If you're just building a rack, I'd recommend five of the 17 cm variety. Longer draws = less rope drag. The short ones are only good if the bolts are in a straight line, and those climbs are never that fun anyway. If you get five draws, and your buddy has five, you should be set for most stuff. You can always salvage draws from the middle of the climb to finish putting the rope up if you run short.

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