dre2463579

dre2463579

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dre2463579

dre2463579 wrote a review of on January 6, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

While I haven't had this long enough to make a call on long-term reliability, I can say that it worked great out of the box, was easy to install, and has been flawless over the first month and ~200 trail miles in the PNW mud. Having used (and returned due to blown seals) a Reverb and KS Lev, this one has been the most pleasant user experience of the lot so far. The trigger feels great on the bar and fits well with shifter/brakes. Fingers crossed on reliability!

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dre2463579

dre2463579 wrote a review of on December 11, 2013

They messed this one up
1 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Alas, KS screwed up what would have been a great post with an awful actuator design. By actuator, I refer to the gizmo on the bottom of the post (so inside the frame) that releases the post to let it move up or down. The design KS chose was to affix the cable head to the bottom of the post, such that the cable doesn't move. When you hit the handlebar trigger, it's actually the housing that moves along the (fixed) cable.

The problem is obvious: the housing goes through all sorts of zip ties and grommets on its way into the post, so it doesn't move freely. Also, because the housing is not affixed to the bottom of the post, any raising or lowering of the post in the frame makes it quit working.

This is an awful design, and I assume KS will fix it soon as it's basically non-functional. Let's hope so, as this minor screwup ruins what could have been a great post.

UPDATE:
I stand by my initial negative review, but as pointed out below KS has since addressed this issue with a revised actuator. You can see a photo of the new one at the link below; basically if you have a rigid piece that protruded down from the bottom of your post it's the new one.
http://ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb10680054/p4pb10680054.jpg

I have no experience with the revised post, so can't comment on the new design. I believe KS will retrofit existing posts if you send them in, though it's not a fast process.

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dre2463579

dre2463579 wrote a review of on April 1, 2013

5 5

I just finished my first loooong day out on these: 14 hours and 7000+ feet of everything the late-season east Cascades has to offer. Ski carry in, boot packing and skinning through brushy undergrowth on rotten snow low down, big fields of perfect spring snow, skinning up steep crusty awful, occasional pow stashes. Normally I would have preferred something skinnier for this kind of day, but the Hang5 was all I had in the quiver so I gave it a try.
I was very pleasantly surprised. These aren't the very lightest (don't forget the weight of the mondo-sized skin you need to cover those bases), but for their width they're excellent. The camber and sidecut under foot made them bite really well on firm side-hill skin tracks, and the width kept them on top of crumbly rotten stuff on the up. On the down, they absolutely rocked: floaty as you'd expect on pow, but with firm, poppy tails that made them amazingly snappy and fun on firmer spring snow. These definitely have personality; the slight bulge in the tip rocker can really bring them around quick when you engage an edge, and they reward aggressive weight-forward charging with none of the vagueness that super-rockered pow skis can yield when initiating turns. The long effective edge also gives them great bite on firmer snow, which was nice on the long, route-finding, cliff-band-dodging ski-bushwhack nightmare that was our exit route. I haven't yet taken them out in deep powder; I expect they'll float great due to the fat, rockered tip and handle well at speed, but perhaps lack some of the surfy-smeary playful feel of a ski with a more aggressively rockered tip and tail.
All in all, I'm really stoked about these skis. They are pretty sweet in nearly any condition, and definitely inspire confidence. If you want the float of a fatter ski but the stability of a flatter tail and the ability to crush any condition a long backcountry tour can throw at you, these rock.

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dre2463579

dre2463579 wrote a review of on March 1, 2013

5 5

I tried out many, many different gloves in my quest for an ideal backcountry skiing and winter climbing glove. These are the very best. Here's why:

-Fit. These have relatively long, slim fingers, which is perfect for me. I'm 6'2" with somewhat large hands; many of the gloves I tried (BD Squad and Legend, Arc'teryx Zentas) had relatively stubby fingers, which made it tough to fully extend my thumb or spread my fingers wide. Not so the RABs, which fit perfectly; fingers are relatively snug, which adds a good bit of dexterity.

-Great construction. These have leather in all the right places (though I if I were being hypercritical I'd ask for full leather caps on all 4 fingertips, rather than just outside of index and pinky). Even better, the liners are fused to the shells throughout the gloves, rather than being billowy material glued to the shells only at the fingertips. This makes it WAY easier to get these on when your hands are damp, and also improves dexterity since you don't get slop between the liner and shell when trying to grasp things.

-Warm & dry. eVent is great stuff, much more breathable than Gore-Tex in my experience. These gloves stay dry though long winter days in the Pacific NW, where everything gets soggy. And because of the substantial use of leather, you can always throw some Nikwax or similar product on them to prevent the shells from getting saturated.

Conclusion: I've tried lots of gloves; these are the best, and they're even relatively cheap compared to the competition. Get them.

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dre2463579

dre2463579 wrote a review of on March 1, 2013

2 5

Like most Arc'teryx gear, these are beautifully crafted, with excellent attention to detail. I'm 6'2" with largish hands, and the XL fit fairly well; the fingers and glove in general are fairly wide and roomy, which is not great in my opinion, as I find that a snug fit yields better dexterity. I could have lived with this, but the real killer for me was that the liners of these gloves are rather bulky and are joined to the shell only at the fingertips. When backcountry skiing or climbing, I often remove my gloves to fiddle with skins or dive into my pack; with these, if my hands are even a bit damp it's damn near impossible to get them back on without the liners bunching up in the fingers. The thumb is particularly bad, as it's attached to the shell only on the back of the glove, where your thumbnail would be; I could feel lots of slop between the liner and the shell in the thumb, which made gripping things pretty tough. These might be OK for resort skiing or anyone who plans to put them on and rarely remove them. I returned these; the RAB guide gloves were way better in this regard; those are my go-to glove from now on.

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dre2463579

dre2463579 wrote a review of on November 7, 2008

5 5

These things are freakin' spectacular: super stiff, way comfortable, lock your feet in but feel as comfy as slippers while doing it. I've used them in a 12 and a 24 hour race, and they quite simply disappeared on the bike; I never thought of them once, which is the highest praise for a pair of shoes. They'll make your feet happy. Two thumbs up.

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