daniel roy

daniel roy

Spent a significant amount of time hiking around Colorado, Kentucky, Tennessee, and of course grew up in Louisiana; definitely the Dirty South!

daniel's Passions

Hiking & Camping

daniel's Bio

Born and raised in Louisiana, which would explain the profile pic. While it may appear that I'm smoking a doobie I'm actually enjoying my favorite sport of all...suckin crawdad heads!!!MMM...now where's the possum stew, LOL? On a real note, nature is what makes my willy silly. Having traveled through and lived in so many various concrete jungles over the years I simply can't get enough of wildlife and nature. It's what makes me get up and keep going everyday. I grew up camping, hunting and fishing in Louisiana. When I left home @ 23 I moved to Denver, CO where I was introduced to REAL mountains...not those tiny hills in Arkansas (no offense to Arkansas...it's beautiful). I was blown away. Got into snowboarding although I can't say I am great at it. I guess I'm just old school and homegrown cuz no matter where I go every broad strip of land I see uninhabited I find myself daydreaming about where the best spot to tent would be, where's the nearest water source, what kinda wildlife looks readily available for an evening roast over the fire, etc., etc. I was diagnosed w/ an unexplained grandmal seizure disorder about ten years ago and my doctor (and every other dr. I have unfortunately seen over the years) tells me I need to stay off mountains, don't hunt, stay on land if I go fishing, don't swim, definitely don't go skiing on water or snow, and whatever I do make sure I am close to an ER and that I am never alone. Given my upbringing and the things I have experienced in life I just find it all a tall order. I figure I can't live my life in fear of what 'may' happen, so I don't let it rob me of the things I want to do the most. After all, should I adhere to that aforementioned 'no-no' list I'd might as well crawl under a rock and die. Stay on shore to fish? No hunting? Stay off a mountain...that's crazy talk. Well, after way too many years of putting it off because of my condition I have weaned myself nearly all the way off my meds and have been seizure free for over 2 years; I do believe I am about to tackle the Appalachian Trail or else it's going to tackle me. Either way, I'm going to soon find out who will win. It's all I think about anymore and I find myself spending all my free time spent indoors sitting on my netbook keeping a watchful eye on SAC and surfing BC while bugging the gearheads from time to time. When the weather is nice I chill outdoors testing all my gear to see how well it should hold up out on that trail. Should I complete the AT without fail I plan on going for the Triple Crown and hitting the PCT and the CDT. I know that also sounds like a tall order, but its better than sitting around letting doctors tell you what you shouldn't do with your few precious moments in life!!! Live Free, Play Hard or GO HOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

daniel roy

daniel roy wrote an answer about on May 19, 2009

I own this jacket and have worn it through torrential downpours in Kentucky and Louisiana, which is the worst rains Ive ever experienced anywhere in the US. It is definitely waterproof! As far as the durability of the material goes, its pretty darn tough. I wore this jacket through alot of brush cutting at my hunting camp this last year. The camp being in Louisiana is full of thick briar patches and lots of sweetgum trees. At first I worried about this jacket but after a couple weeks of riding the quads through the thickets while blazing our hunting trails Ive yet to have a rip, nor even a thread come loose. I bought this shell based on a review it got in the Backpacker 08 gear review guide. I am more than happy to have made the purchase and would make it again at least ten times before trying anything else as it can't be beat for price, weight, packability, durability....and most importantly waterproofability!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote an answer about on May 14, 2009

Golite.com has the Spectre listed at 13.8 oz (391g). I own a golite Virga; much lighter and very scaled down. I luv it and wouldnt trade it for anything. However, I have been looking at the Spectre for various reasons. You ought to try and catch this item on SteepandCheap.com cuz I have seen it for well over 50% off.

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote a review of on May 13, 2009

5 5

I know many people complain about the lack of quality from TNF these days. Im an old school TNF fan and have been using their gear for quite a few years. While I cant disagree w/ anyone about that issue I still personally like TNF gear. If you purchase the more expensive equipment the quality seems to be the same to me as the older stuff. I agree with the reviewer who said it makes a perfect pillow when its stuffed into its stow pocket. That is a great feature. Sizing is precarious for this item because I usually wear a medium but took a risk on ordering the small based on a review below. Im 5 foot 7 about 150 lbs and the small is perfect. Had I gone with a medium it probably would have been a bit more roomy than I wanted this piece to be (I still have plenty of room for a base layer, midwieght fleece, as well as my Montbell UL Down Parka underneath it). Also, while the medium is only 1 inch longer in lenth than the small I wanted to make sure it would be plenty well covered by my rainshell so as not to suck up any moisture during a downfall. I got the Camo becuz it simply rules!!! I hunt so camo is a favorite style for me. Plus Im an old school user of TNF products and can't stand the TNF yuppy trend that has transpired over the last several years....Id hate to go around looking like the TNF billboard and this camo vest should keep me from looking as though Im just another yuppy TNF trendy. However, one look at me would tell you Im not a trendy, yuppy, TNF customer, lol.

Great vest, love it!!!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote a review of on May 13, 2009

5 5

I first purchased a 50 oz. bladder and soon found out that it just wasnt quite enough and forced me to have to carry a nalgene, which Id rather not do since it takes up more space in my pack. Im more a minimalist so the upgrade to the 72 oz (for only a couple extra bux) was well worth it. The first one I owned started leaking around where the tube connects to the bladder after only being detatched twice for cleaning. I figure this was simply a manufacturing flaw out of the batch that I recieved (first one purchased last year). I have detatched the tube on my new one several times just to make sure it was not going to give me any problems like the last one and it has held up fine. You got to expect at least one bad product from every assembly line. However, these bladders are the greatest. I have put water in these bladders with a little ice and left them sitting out directly in the Louisiana scorching sun for hours on end while fishing and my water stayed cold. It stays cold in every environment Ive used it in. The water tastes great, leaves no odd or plastic taste, and makes carrying enough hydration around a breeze. As stated, Id definitely go with a 72 oz over the smaller ones cuz you dont have to fill it all the way if you dont want to carry the extra weight of the water you wont use on short trips, runs, etc. I can't say enough great things about these bladders, not even after having a faulty one.

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote a review of on May 13, 2009

3 5

I purchased the foon, but recieved the spoon, so I can't comment on the fork portion of this piece of gear. This definitely is not a utensil that you want to dig into really solid food and if you're looking into eating some icecream then I'd let it sit and soften up a good bit. Im not sure where the complaints on the retracting handle are coming from because mine works fine. Handle the retraction with some sense because the plastic could be able to cut you. Ive read reviews stating they've cut themselves on the handle, but as I said...use some sense while handling and you'll operate this cut free. I will say that I love the small size of this utensil and I particularly pack non cooked foods for the back country to save time, space, weight, and labor. However I do carry the staple of outdoor journeys such as mac n cheese and ramens, oatmeal and grits. For such things which are pretty popular trail foods this utensil works great. I can store it neatly inside my GSI Soloist kit which is a big plus for me. It stays safe in there with no worries of it getting banged up or broken. For my use its actually perfect, although it will not replace my Light My Fire Spork for when I catch some trout or drag a good steak into the back country. I'd recommend it for the uses I say its good for.

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote a review of on May 13, 2009

3 5

First off, lol @ DakkaGuru's comment. Goood stuff!

I purchased the foon, but recieved the spoon, so I can't comment on the fork portion of this piece of gear. This definitely is not a utensil that you want to dig into really solid food and if you're looking into eating some icecream then I'd let it sit and soften up a good bit. Im not sure where the complaints on the retracting handle are coming from because mine works fine. Handle the retraction with some sense because the plastic could be able to cut you. Ive read reviews stating they've cut themselves on the handle, but as I said...use some sense while handling and you'll operate this cut free. I will say that I love the small size of this utensil and I particularly pack non cooked foods for the back country to save time, space, weight, and labor. However I do carry the staple of outdoor journeys such as mac n cheese and ramens, oatmeal and grits. For such things which are pretty popular trail foods this utensil works great. I can store it neatly inside my GSI Soloist kit which is a big plus for me. It stays safe in there with no worries of it getting banged up or broken. For my use its actually perfect, although it will not replace my Light My Fire Spork for when I catch some trout or drag a good steak into the back country. I'd recommend it for the uses I say its good for.

Mine didn't have a sticker on it like DakkaGuru's so I haven't had an issue with sticky residue...guess it depends on how it gets packed, etc.

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote a review of on May 4, 2009

5 5

I luv my Karl shirt. Not only is this shirt very comfortable and well made, it will give me an oppurtunity to talk about who Karl is and what it was he was looking to achieve. Even tho he had a run of bad luck and wasn't able to break that record, he at least gave it his all and put forth the effort. I followed his blog while the race was on as I know many ppl did. I fathom sucessfully hiking that trail, but much less running it...at any rate, lol!!! Ill forever be impressed by the effort that guy gave. As for the shirt, not only a conversation piece. Nice fabric, feels good against the skin, well made, fits true to size...great bargain!!!!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote a review of on May 4, 2009

5 5

I simply LOVE Golite products. Great company, ,friendly staff, and awesome quality for gear. I just recieved this shirt today and wore it to work to try out the fit. It fits true to size and allows full range of motiion. No restricting whatsoever, for me. This thing not only is super light, but it wicks sweat EXTREMELY well. I was simply in awe by the performance of this shirt as I worked my hiney off and it wicked away the sweat like it was no body's business. My co-worker even noticed that I hadn't the look of the 'sweaty patch syndrome' like he was sporting on the back of his shirt. I told him about the properties of this shirt and what its designed for. He says he's going to buy one for every day of the week with his next check based on how well mine performed for me. Can't wait to get out in the back country with this joker!!! Ive never owned a bad piece of gear from Golite; they rule and I highly recommend their gear to everyone!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote an answer about on May 3, 2009

I tried a new Prolite small and it was ok. I actually gave it a good review. However, the temps dropped well below freezing one night (around 15 degrees) unexpectedly and my body nearly frooze! I am not a cold sleeper, but it was downright cold that night. I thought the small would get me thru, but it wasn't gettin it. It would make a good spring/summer pad. I also am 5'6" and after seeing the reviews on this, pad and the regular size being just perfect, I sent the Prolite back and am waiting to see the regular size show back up. I'm sure it will make all the difference in the world at just a few ounces more than that Prolite and Im definitely willing to pack those few extra ounces for warmth, mainly, but comfort also.

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote an answer about on April 30, 2009

Mark, I could tell you a myriad of ways to go about doing that with near bout any solar panel, but your best bet from what it sounds like you are looking for is the Brunton Solarport 4.4

http://www.backcountry.com/store/BRU0148/Brunton-Solarport-44.html

take a look at that link. It's a few more dollars than what this panel is, however, this lil d00d packs a punch! You got your USB, your AA & AAA recharger as well as a 12v/6v charger all in one package for just over a lb. (19 oz.) all in one slimline 9x6x1.5" package. For what it is, you can't ask for more unless you're looking for some higher wattage than that. But for some recharge batteries, I haven't found anything sweeter than this. And BC is carrying them for round 40 bux less than Brunton suggests. You gotta love BC for their great deals! Also, very important to note about this Solaris that you are looking at is that while it is listed as 6 watts here on BC I went over to Brutnton and found it to be rated at 3 watts. I talked to a gearhead about this who said he is looking into it in case BC has it listed wrong. However, I double checked the specs BC has for that solarport 4.4 against what Brunton has listed for it and they're right on the money. Its ironic I came across your question cuz I'm in the market for just this type of item...usb, aa/aaa recharger, 12 volt adapter so that I can run an inverter from 12v to dc power. This is great stuff...Im bout to scoop this guy up myself. Hope this helps!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote an answer about on April 29, 2009

Typically the coupons work like this:
If item is on sale then you can't use the discount unless the item on sale's discount is less than the % of your coupon. i.e. Shirt 20% off on sale - your coupon would boost that sale to 25% of the original tag price, not the sale price. However, as Cyrus pointed out its not going to hurt you to try. Having said that I must warn you I have recently run across a bug in the CODE COUPON system and have lost out pretty big...can't go into details bout my situation until it has been resolved, sorry. So, I would hold onto that COUPON and save it for something you can definitely get your 25% off on. IMHO, I just wouldn't take the chance given my recent (last 24 hour) experience. Only asnwers I can get thus far from gear heads is that there's a bug in the system and so now Ive been passed off to marketing and the ultimate powers that b @ BC. Try your luck, though it may be a gamble or just wait and use it on something the discount would do you some good on. Good question tho and hope I was able to help shed some insight for you. If you're new to Backcountry I encourage you to utilize the live chat with a representative. The 'gearheads' are very helpful, friendly, and provide great customer satisfaction. Ive been dealing with BC a while now and have only just recently came across an issue they couldn't give me an answer for, but my case is a strange one. However...be warned that they have a lot of new reps these days that are still learning the ropes so you may want to talk to a couple of them for a lil checks and balance for your questions. But seriously, they truly are a delight to chat with about gear and for the most part are pretty informative and useful! They'er actually priceless to me!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote an answer about on April 29, 2009

Sorry bout that horrible pic, John, but my real camera is dead rite now and had to shoot that with this friggin Blackberry. Also, here are the items in that pack that didn't get copied over from my packing list for some reason...think maybe there's a text limit on picture discriptions...my first time at that.

REI T1 Quarterdome tent w/ rain fly & groundsheet
Lafuma X 950 Pro sleeping bag
Thermarest Prolite pad (small)
GSI Soloist cookset
MSR Pocket Rocket stove
lite my fire spork
2 MSR ISObutnae cannisters
Golite Virga
Sierra Designs Hurricane pants
Montbel UL Down parka

add all those items listed here to the ones listed alongside that photo then add in a few days food and there's the Golite Jam2 and its not even slam packed. I know you can't tell really from the photo but the lid is all the way rolled over and compressed down as far as it goes. So there is still tons of room in the top of my pack. Not only that, the side compresion straps are fully compressed...once again, there's still tons of room in this pack and its got everything I would need to make a thru-hike pretty much anywhere somewhat near civilization. Of course, with my trusty Shakespeare and AquaMira drops I could prolly get by without the need for resupply if I sat back and took my time from fishing hole to fishing hole...though I wouldn't EVER rely on that, lol...Im pretty good fisher but aint tryin to be man vs wild or survivorman, lol. Oh yeah, I also forgot to list the fact Im packin a small cooler...the 5 dollar walmart 6 pack special with cooler lid...ya know, for a few cold ones from time to time!!! Hope this helps to somewhat give you an idea of what this dude can take. Check your gear agianst mine and think about it. Unlike most people I was willing to take the Pepsi challenge on buying a pack before I got all the rest of my gear based on some reviews and a couple of BC gearhead conversations. Ive looked at many others since and at this capacity and the weight this is the most rugged pack I could find...still to this day. Im actually about to purchase a Golite Pinnacle for some harsh winter camping trips where Ill need quite a bit more room for certain things. Oh, btw...in case you or anyone else who comes along is wondering if Im hiking around in Patagonia Cap 2s and paper scrubs, lol....nah, I didn't list my TNF convertible cargo pants cuz they're always on my body, not in my pack unless its at night...at which point I have changed into my mental ward paper scrubs (dont ask how I got the scrubs...long time ago, much longer story, even longer bottle of taquila!). Happy hunting!

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daniel roy

daniel roy posted an image about on April 29, 2009

Golite Jam2 packed out for AT thru

REI T1 Quarterdome tent w/ rain fly & groundsheet
Lafuma X 950 Pro sleeping bag
Thermarest Prolite pad (small)
GSI Soloist cookset
MSR Pocket Rocket stove
lite my fire spork
2 MSR ISObutnae cannisters
Golite Virga
Sierra Designs Hurricane pants
Montbel UL Down parka
TNF Velocitee T
TNF Chesterson Fleece
Sports Science 1/4 Zip merino long sleeve
1 set of scrubs (the paper kind u get in mental ward, lol)
3 pair midweight Darn Tough wool socks
Patagonia Capilene 2 bottoms
Black Diamond Sportee gaiters
Everlite EL8 Solar powered headleamp w/ 12 volt, dc, and usb adapters
Black Diamond ION headlamp
3 nite ize s-biners
Camelbak Omega Hydro bladder 70 oz.
sea to Summit Evac compression sack (small)
sea to summit ultralite pack cover (small) - swallows the pack
Sea to summit ultralite silnylon stuff sack (xsmall)
sea to summit ultralite silnylon rolltop 8 liter drysak
Leki Aergon Carbonlite trekking poles
McNett silnylon repair and Tape
Small medical and emergency kit
Shakespeare collapsible ultralite rod
Tacklebox
20 nalgene bottle
Bandanas
Multitool
Couple o backpacker magazines (what else?)

oh yeah...and my TNF Paramount Convertibles, which never see my bag unless its warm and I slip into my loony-bin, paper scrubs :)

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote an answer about on April 29, 2009

Hey, John! I own this pack; bought it for the AT. While some may claim that with it being a frameless pack you shouldn't carry more than 25 lbs. in it, I think they're way wrong. When I first bought this a year ago I stuffed well over 50 lbs. of groceries in it (lol, had to try it out with something cuz it was the first piece of gear I bought after loosing all my former gear). For 50 lbs. worth of bulky weight it actually rode pretty well on that journey back to my apt. I have never used a bear cannister and honestly can't tell you that I've ever put my hands on one to tell you that I know for a fact I large cannister will fit. I will, however, say that if you pack properly then this would probably work well for you. The reason I say this is that you already mentioned strapping a bag and pad on the outside. This pack is GREAT for strapping/lashing gear to it. It does have the ice axe loops which work great for anything like that. It has the pad/bag loops on the bottom of the pack that you can use to lash your pad, sleeping bag to, if you wanna go old school. Another thing that makes this pack great for lashing is the compression straps on this pack are quite long. Ive seen people complain about this, but I think they are great. I lash all kinda stuff to this pack utilizing the extra length of the compressions straps (including my trekking poles, collapsible fishing rod and tackle box).

It sounds like you already have an idea what your weight will be and at 30 lbs. you defintely have a pack here that can handle that really well. Its hard to say not knowing your equipment, but one thing I found to help me out utilizing all the space in this pack is dry compression sacks such as the Sea to Summit Evac. My tent and sleeping bag used to take up a large portion of this bag's lower interior. I got rid of the tent's original sack and rolled it down real tightly to fit into a Sea to Summit 4 liter dry sak and then put my sleeping bag and extra clothes that wouldn't be worn thruout the day into the Evac sak and compressed it down to a tiny little ball. I pack the tent poles in their original sack towards the outside by the outer pocket, and down in between the compression sack and tent. Once again, without knowing your gear its hard for me to say, but after making a few packing adjustments I feel like my pack grew 1000 cubic inches. I'm pretty minimalist also, so take that into consideration if you are taking alot of clothing. Every ounce I pack counts towards more than one task. If you truly feel like you may need more than this pack has to offer in cu.in. I would try out the Golite Pinnacle if you're simply wanting to stay with the idea of a ultralight pack such as Golite. Man, I looked at alot of 'lightweight'' packs and none of them compared to Golite in terms of durability. After a year of pretty rough use it still looks brand new as if it never met a briar bush. Great pack! Give it a try and if you don't think it'll fit your gear, send it back to Backcountry and exchange it for a Golite Pinnacle. Pretty much the same pack except more interior. If you're not concerned about the bells and whistles on a pack and are looking for reasonable and durability as well as efficient system then one of the two are your best options IMHO!

http://www.backcountry.com/store/GOL0322/GoLite-Pinnacle-Pack-4400cu-in.html

http://www.backcountry.com/store/STS0002/Sea-To-Summit-eVent-Compression-Dry-Sack.html

ive never posted a pic on here before, but I'll go drag my buster out of the closet and pack my gear up in it and see if I can't get a shot of it along with my packing list to see if that can help you get a visual, also. If I can't get the picture up for some reason or get sidetracked by honeydos in the mean time then please forgive me. Hope this helps and good luck pack hunting!!! By the account you're packing a cannister I suppose a 'watch out for da bears' is in order, lol!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote a question about on April 26, 2009

Ok, let's face it; while many think its simply gross many of us guys go commando. I have been f433b@11in for many years. Recently, however, I have been contemplating on getting me a pair of boxers like these. Since it seems after many reviews of various brands that these are the recommended best my only question is this...is it like cramming your three friends in a Honda CRX or a luxury Civic? Please, any quick advice on this would be greatly appreciated cuz I'd like to order some pretty soon for a thru hike. I can deal with returning insoles even, but I don't think I'd want to be on the recieving end of anyone's skivvy returns, lol!

thanks in advance!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote a review of on April 22, 2009

2 5

I was seriously disappointed in this purchase. After all the hype and great reviews I have read about these soles I figured they must be gold. Only becuz they seem to work for alot of people did I not give them 1 star. However, i'm not going to completely bash them becuz if your shoes, boots, etc. do absolutley suck in the footbed area then these might do you some good. I have a high arch foot and figured these insoles would help that out. Well, it helped out the arch support a little but after a week of trying to get used to these I simply couldn't. They were murder on my heels and forefoot. Superfeet for me was more like sadistic feet. The insoles feel like you are standing on concrete...at least to me it was (no padding at all). I ended up shoving some Dr. Scholl's gell soles into my hiking shoes and reinserted the original Merrel insoles over the Dr. Scholl's and now my feet are fine. I should have tried this before I went to the expense of Superfeet, but with all the great reviews I have read I fugred...well...let me just end it on saying for me this was a horribly painful and costly experience. These are definitely going into my BC return/refund box!!!!

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daniel roy

daniel roy wrote an answer about on April 21, 2009

No it doesn't. The purpose of this item is to suck out the unusable but remining fuel out of your fuel canister to fill up a reusable butane lighter, such as the Egear polycarbonate Windmill. I am pretty sure it will work refilling any refillable butane lighter though.

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