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crtolson809902

crtolson809902

crtolson809902's Passions

Climbing

crtolson809902

crtolson809902wrote a review of on June 7, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I've always held the Nissan/Thermos stainless steel vacuum bottles as the gold standard. The Thermos 'silver bullet' (1.75 cup size) being a great companion in my ice climbing pack, keeping a hot drink available for that final, cold belay of the day.
Here's a quick, un-scientific test comparison with the Primus. From room temperature of 74F and with no pre-heating, I poured boiling tap water into the Primus (~1.25 cup size) and the Nissan/Thermos (~1.75 cup size) and screwed in the stopper and cup/cap on them. I didn't check the boiling temperature but my elevation is ~2770ft so go figure it out if you like. These full bottles were placed in a (-)05F freezer for 3.5 hrs. I then removed them and shook the contents a bit to get a good distribution of liquid temp., assuming the water near the stopper would be slightly cooler than the rest.
The result is that the Primus had cooled to ~165F (good hot drink temperature) and the Nissan/Thermos had cooled to ~175F. So, I give this Primus a pretty cool (er hot) rating. I don't give the Primus 5 stars because the screw in stopper has a spring push button mechanism to allow you to pour without unscrewing the lid. (The Nissan/Thermos is a partial unscrew to pour) In my book, keep it simple works best in nasty conditions and although you can bypass the push button stopper and just unscrew the whole stopper, relying on the spring mechanism to keep a seal in my pack with critical insulating gear is a question mark I'll need to test before I give this all five stars.
Regardless, the insulating qualities of this Primus (and the Nissan/Thermos) are far superior to the common knock off, non-vacuum, "double wall" stuff you see around in similar price range.

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crtolson809902

crtolson809902wrote a review of on March 28, 2010

3 5

I purchased this rope a few years ago. The teflon gives it a slippery feel at first but after a few climbs it feels 'normal'. It is the first Mammut rope I've purchased. I like knowing this line has everything a company can put into a modern rope to make it less prone to failure. I've used it on sharp limestone, waterfall ice, and glaciers and it provides a little more piece of mind; especially now that I'm climbing with my adult kids. I also use another brand of line in a twin setup when situations are appropriate.
The only reason I would not buy this rope again is because it has a huge tendency to twist very badly. I uncoiled it for the first time using the method Mammut recommends for uncoiling a new rope but it still twists badly. I thought maybe after a dozen rappels or so it would get better but it hasn't improved. I've even rapped on it as a single line just to try to "untwist" or reset the fibers. As I rap down the line I can see the spiral twists of the sheath and dread the cluster I know will be at the bottom. When belaying there's always a cluster twist as the leader nears the end of a pitch. I've actually untied to rid the twists before following a pitch. Hopefully this drawback has been taken care of. I would definitely buy this again if it weren't for this issue.
The ads state this is the first rope to meet the UIAA fall test over an edge but some time ago, I had an Edelweiss that claimed the same and that was back in the late 1980's. Maybe there are more stringent UIAA edge fall tests now or Mammut and Edelweiss are referring to different tests. Given this twisting with the Mammut, I think I'd recommend ensuring somehow it had been fixed by Mammut. This will be a rope I consider next time around but I'm sure I'll be looking at what Edelweiss or others have to offer in as similar 'supersafe' thread.

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crtolson809902

crtolson809902wrote a question about on February 15, 2010

Great to read other opinions. So, what, if any of the Scarpa line would compare/replace the Sportiva Nepal EVO? I've climbed in the Sportiva, vert ice, alpine, and ok for longer approaches(not without discomfort). They are very nice but now in need of another, looking around for the latest/greatest (lightest??).

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crtolson809902

crtolson809902wrote a question about on September 15, 2009

It appears from the photos that most other chairs of this type made by Lafuma and other companies have a horizontal bar or 'footrest' but this doesn't seem to have one. Can anyone comment on this? Does it reduce the stability or durability?
Last question: we need a chair that raises the feet and lower legs to be level with or slightly above heart level. I can't tell from the images. Can anyone comment? Thanks a bunch!

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