brendandouglas

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brendandouglas

brendandouglas wrote an answer about on May 14, 2014

Actually there are both womens and mens versions of the Five Ten Blackwings, as well as the La Sportiva Miura Lace, so I'm not sure I understand your reference. There is no confusion, I was simply making a statement. These are marketed as mens shoes, despite the fact that they're pink, and, of course, women can and do wear them if they fit properly. They are certainly not low volume, though. For that, there is the Five Ten Anasazi VCS LV, which IS marketed specifically to women.

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brendandouglas

brendandouglas wrote a review of on May 4, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This is my third pair of Five Ten Anasazi Lace-Ups (my first two were Anasazi Verde's), so its quite obvious that I really like this shoe, however, with one MAJOR caveat: the fit of the heel is absolutely terrible. While these are not necessarily meant for steep climbing or bouldering (mostly techy slab and/or slightly overhanging routes), the fit of the heel completely prohibits you from using it in any application whatsoever thereby relegating it to very specific uses only-certainly not an all around shoe. While a shoe like the TC Pro is designed for technical edging on big walls while being comfortable, it actually heel hooks very well on steep stuff. That being said, the heel in the new Pinks is ten times better than on my old Verdes. So, what this shoe has been designed for, it excels at: very precise edging, smearing (C4 rubber is tackier for this application than the Onyxx that was on my Verdes), pockets, and cracks of all widths. I found this shoe to edge slightly better than my La Sportiva Miura lace-ups, however this held its shape better (they're both pretty flat-lasted). Five Ten shoes run very small in my experience. I wear a 12.5 in these and they are extremely tight and painful for more than one burn. These do what they were intended to do, VERY well, so I will continue to buy them without hesitation.

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brendandouglas

brendandouglas wrote a review of on November 14, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Never has a climbing shoe (or perhaps a shoe of any other kid) fit me so perfectly. I have tried on/tried out over thirty pairs of climbing shoes, and none of them have been perfect in every way, as the La Sportiva Solution has. I have a very wide, acutely arched foot, and a very low volume heel, and often have trouble fitting into aggressive climbing shoes. I have owned and used extensively : La Sportiva Miura Lace-Up in 46 (excellent all around shoe, but became very sloppy over time), the Five Ten Anasazi Verde in 12.5 (excellent edging shoe but horrible, baggy heel), and the La Sportiva Solution (perfect in every way possible). The heel cup, suction-cups to my heel, and the indentation under the ball of my foot perfectly nestles my forefoot into the tip of the shoe for absolute sensitivity and power focus into my toes. Now, for the performance: This thing edges on a dime on slabs and vertical routes (not the best at smearing), heel-hooks and toe-hooks on steep sport routes and boulder problems, and its sensitivity and stickiness has no equal. It is not the best all around shoe, however, for the kind of climbing it was designed for, I feel that it has not equal. I usually wear 12.5/13 in street shoes, and in these I wear an 11/44.5 for a performance fit.

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brendandouglas

brendandouglas wrote a review of on June 2, 2013

2 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The build quality, the quality of the down that Western Mountaineering use (850 fill-power Goose Down), and the design itself are second to none. They are all handmade and usually made to order in northern California, which is a rarity these days. I bought the Megalite because I am extremely tall (6'6'') and broad shouldered, and I fit perfectly inside with room to spare. It packs down to the size of about two, 1 liter Nalgene bottles, and even smaller if you have a compression stuff sack. It weighs next to nothing. Everything else aside, this bag was simply not warm enough for its rating. I gave it 5 trips into the backcountry before I decided to send it back. During 4 out of 5 of those trips the temps did not dip below 40 degrees and I was still freezing, and I run EXTREMELY hot. I thought I would spring for a top class, ultralight piece of kit after twenty years with an old North Face Foxfire, but $420 is way too much to pay for something that does not keep you warm. In retrospect, if I was to buy another Western Mountaineering bag, I would buy the Alpinlite, but a bag this expensive is an extreme luxury. I'll stick with my old Foxfire for now.

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brendandouglas

brendandouglas wrote a review of on June 2, 2013

2 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This is a pack designed for fast and light single-day adventures. I have used it mostly for very long day-hikes (10-20 miles) and peak bagging adventures (14ers, 13ers, etc), It fits a fully filled 3 liter bladder (I use the Osprey Hydraform Reservoir), an extra mid/outer layer (Patagonia Nano Puff for me), beanie,thin glove liners, a ton of bars/gels, leatherman, bear spray, first aid kit, etc. The suspension is adequate for this size pack totally full (I'm 6'6''and I use the medium/large size). One major caveat; while it is very lightweight, it is very fragile. After about 2 months of regular use the tab that holds the reservoir against the backpack strap has ripped off and I have no less than 5 holes on the bottom of the pack, just from setting it down. Also the design is a little too busy (too many pockets/mesh) and cheesy for my taste (talons?) I'm pretty disappointed with this effort, so I'm returning it. After sampling many other packs, especially from Arc'teryx (top quality), I settled on the Petzl Bug, which suits me perfectly for both peak bagging efforts and a multi-pitch climbing pack.

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brendandouglas

brendandouglas wrote a review of on June 1, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've owned many fingerboards/hangboards (Metolius Wood Grips Deluxe, Metolius Project Board, ETCH Motherboard, SoILL Iron Palm), and none of them are as versatile as these. If you're doing pull-ups, they're perfect because doing pullups on a fixed hangboard is HORRIBLE for your elbows. If you're training dead hangs, which is really what hang boards are for, they're perfect as you have a four finger pocket, three finger pocket, and a two finger pocket. Because the rings aren't fixed, you are forced to use stabilizer muscles in order to prevent swinging all over the place, so your core will get stronger too. I take mine wherever I travel, and invariably find a place to hang them. To top it all off, they're only $30! The only disadvantage with these is that you can't campus.

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brendandouglas

brendandouglas wrote a review of on June 1, 2013

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

These shoes were excellent for a while (about two months of climbing 3-4 times per week outside), however, they quickly lost their shape and became sloppy. I think these shoes would've benefited from La Sportiva's patented P3 (Permanent Power Platform) in order to retain their slight downturned nature. It absolutely blows my mind that a completely flat-lasted shoe like the TC Pro has it (P3) and this doesnt. Also, the dentex liner started to separate from the leather pretty quickly. I use these exclusively for crack climbing now-no more face climbing for these guys. Some people, even pros, swear by these, but I'm far from sold.

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