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Jared's Passions

Camping

Jared's Bio

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cad3040163 wrote an answer about on January 24, 2013

I'd probably get a large though a medium should work - I use a medium for my pinnacle which is a little smaller. Would you rather have your bag compress to be shorter but fatter (large bag), or taller and skinnier (medium)? That really depends on how you pack your pack. Additionally, are you inclined to put anything else in with it like a sleeping bag liner? Food for thought, regardless those event compression sacks are awesome!

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cad3040163 wrote a review of on December 3, 2012

1 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Have you ever wanted your feet, especially your heels, to hurt more than you imagined at the end of the day? Have you ever wanted to spend money to accomplish this masochistic goal? Than THESE might be the insoles for you!

Seriously, whoever came up with the idea of putting a wedge of plastic under your heel deserves to be slapped silly with their own invention. I stuck with these for 1 1/2 months of daily use and the discomfort only grew. It felt like I was developing plantar fascitis. I've heard people swear by these just like I've heard people swear them off. Make sure you buy them from a place with a good return policy in case you fall into the latter category.

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cad3040163

cad3040163 wrote a review of on December 3, 2012

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've been working trails for the last few years and have averaged about 1 season per boot. I put my boots through hell and have been known to wear them for months on end, literally. I bought these because they stopped distributing Kayland boots in the US.

A friend convinced me to ditch the gore-tex and go for a good, all leather boot and treat it with obenauf's. This is literally the first pair of boots I've had that lasted me more than one season! The inside is calfskin leather, making it easier to clean and condition. Also making it easier to not smell like something died in your boots.

The sole has held up exceptionally well, I might expect to go the better part of another season before either getting these resoled or getting a new pair. Other boots have run out of tread long before these.

If you have wider feet Asolo has a better fit, but La Sportivas shine for folks with narrow to medium width feet.

In the future I'd like to see the ankle area with tougher leather - I've seen other pairs of Pamir's blow out on the rear part of the ankle. My pair did fail after a couple of months by the cloth shoe lace thing - all the other ones are metal but the cloth one where your ankle pivots didn't hold up. I can still lace it up fine it just only fits well instead of very well now.

Truth be told I doubt very many people need to spend $300 on a pair of boots. If you've got the cash or you need a pair of boots built to last and are willing to maintain the leather well these will do you good. For the average user (maybe 3 -12 backpacking trips a year?), with proper care, I could see this boot lasting a decade easily.

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cad3040163

cad3040163 wrote an answer about on February 25, 2012

i've had a bora 65 for several years and if I'm not mistaken the bottom compartment is does not have the water resistant/repellent stuff - regardless I've definitely had water seep through the bottom when I've put it on the ground at base camp for extended periods of time in wet conditions. I've never bothered with a rainfly though with over 400 days of use and no shortage of downpours, just put your down bag in one of those handy event compression sacks and you won't have to think about it. Water can get in the brain though so be smart with what you put in there/how you put it in there.

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cad3040163

cad3040163 wrote a question about on December 5, 2010

I am a slightly small guy - 5'8, 150, medium to slight build and am not sure whether a small or medium would be more appropriate. A big concern for me is how the neck will fit - I am at the 14 1/2 inch range putting me at the cusp of small and medium and I know virtually no shirt or jacket I buy fits my neck, ever. If I'm thinking of spending over $300 I'd rather not need a scarf to prevent draft. any hints on the fit?

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cad3040163

cad3040163 wrote a review of on October 14, 2009

5 5

This summer I watched with glee as two ultralight hikers watched both of their steripens fail on them. Not because I wanted anything bad to happen to them (they had Aquamira tabs as a backup, thankfully) but because this validated my backpacking philosophy that the best gear is simple and has less things that can break. After all, our most negative experiences are usually associated with things going wrong, not going right. (remember that time your car started up without any problem whatsoever and your day was great?)Several tips for using this filter: the amount of time it takes to filter water depends on how dirty the water is to begin with and how much water flow/capacity your filter has. If you are in an area with filthy water your filter will clog more. The more surface area your filter has the more water it can filter (size matters) and if your filter is dirty it will not work as fast. Thankfully MSR includes a scour pad to clean their filters with so you can CLEAN YOUR FILTER IN THE FIELD (make sure to sanitize both the spout and your hands afterwords). Also, if you have a large group of people you can use a camelbak/platypus/dromedary bag at base camp. Filter all your water for the night or fill it up and filter as you need it. If it freezes overnight you can usually warm it up faster by pumping water into it and letting it sit for a few minutes. Sleeping with your filter with not only strengthen the bond between you and your filter but will also keep it from freezing overnight.Finally, filtering water is really about Leave No Trace. If the rivers weren't contaminated by feces from cows, horses, and humans, we wouldn't have to worry nearly as much about giardia, cryptosporidium, et al. Respect the restrictions on human waste where ever you hike and if you aren't "allowed" to poo somewhere that is so you can drink the water there and not die.ALWAYS HAVE A BACK UP.

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cad3040163

cad3040163 wrote a review of on October 14, 2009

5 5

I have to admit I was a little unsure about this mattress; I've come to trust thermarest but frankly the neoair looked more like something you'd see a kid floating on at a pool than something that would survive years of backpacking. Could it really live up to expectations?
The short answer, as evidenced by it's overwhelming popular reviews, is yes. It really does compress down to the size of a Nalgene bottle, it really does weigh less than a pound (except for the large), and it really does hold up. I just finished hiking for 2 months straight in the Sierras and mine is still in very good condition, albeit a little dirty. The few nights it dropped below 20 degrees it did get too cold for this mattress, but not by much (thermarest rates the neoair at 30 degrees). I plan on grabbing a prolite plus for winter camping.

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cad3040163

cad3040163 wrote an answer about on October 14, 2009

I have an MSR XGK that is almost identical to the Dragonfly and will fit into virtually any 1 liter pot. I would be surprised if your Dragonfly did not fit.

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cad3040163 wrote a review of on July 22, 2009

3 5

Just got off hiking 500 miles on the PCT with this thing; I have a hard time opening the lid with my fingers and generally just press the butt of my knife against the lid for the same effect. If you stuff it it can be hard to open. Does the job, use only when necessary (this weighs 2.5 lbs more than a bear bag). I can get 6 days of food in here at the most solo but I eat a lot. Bears in California don't bother with bear canisters anymore - I never found mine disturbed in the morning. Saw lots of folks on the JMT with these and lots of us had problem "accidentally" opening these e.g. the lid would stick & then fly open, snaps and all. No bueno. I would not buy this bear canister again except for it's enormous size relative to other bear canisters (most canisters seem to average around 1 gallon). I've heard great things about bearikade The bottom line is that bear canisters suck but getting eaten by a bear sucks more.

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