Bjorn B.

Bjorn B.

Bjorn B.

Bjorn B.wrote a review of on January 5, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

If you need to carry a lot of gear into the backcountry the Float 45 is the ideal pack. Whether you are filling it with a DSLR and a few lenses or packing for an overnight trip, the Float will carry you safely out and back again.
With an airbag, cylinder, and trigger you can feel like you’re carrying a bulky pack before you load any personal gear, but the Float 42 fits any size load with comfort. Against your back you have airbag components while the rear pocket holds a shovel, probe and climbing skins, freeing up the main center cavity for whatever you want. From a single extra layer to a two day supply of gear, the pack feels the same size and sits comfortably on hips and shoulders. A rear helmet carry and side compression straps allow you to change the overall profile and get the right amount of gear fitted to your body as well as the best non-airbag packs out there.
Then there’s the construction, a standard you can trust day after day and through an avalanche. Going into my second year with the float 42 I have not had to repair a single thing, a rare circumstance for any ski pack. You can feel the strength of the fabric, buckles, zippers, and straps. I have strapped ice tools to the pack, carried skis, clipped extra gear, and stuffed the pockets to the brim all while going up and down peaks, through thick trees, over cliffs, and more than a few tumbles and tomahawks. The pack remains resilient with less wear-and-tear than my own body!
But the kicker that makes the Float 42 my go-to pack for every day in the mountains is the safety. In one package you have the benefits of a burly, large technical pack with the added safety of an airbag. There is not enough that can be said for this. Skiing in the backcountry is dangerous, and if you are going to partake there is no excuse to not take every step possible to keep you and your partners safe.

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Bjorn B.

Bjorn B.wrote a review of on January 5, 2016

Bomber
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Nothing feels worse than winding up in a bad situation that could have been avoided by clear communication. That’s why Backcountry Access built upon their reactive safety equipment and created the BC Link Radio, one of the most important tools in preventative avalanche safety.
The benefits of radio communication in the backcountry are apparent: know where your partners are, stay organized, relay new information, and react quickly and effectively to situations. Simply, it beats yelling and hoping you are heard. With the BC Link, you get not only solid communication but a radio designed specifically for backcountry skiing and riding.
Digging through you pack before fumbling with a walkie talkie is a pain, and a thing of the past with BCA’s radios. There is a handheld component which plugs into the actual radio, allowing you to store the radio in your pack but clip the mic and channel selector in an accessible place. I bury my radio at the bottom of my pack and feed the handheld part through strap storage slits/hydration hose openings/or airbag trigger channels. Whenever I am skiing or hiking, the mic is easily within reach without getting in the way.
A two piece radio can be bulky and heavy, but BCA kept the weight down to 12oz with a slim profile. That means you won’t have to leave out that extra victory beer, and you won’t notice the cost of hauling two-way communication to the top of every line. And just to put the icing on the design-cake, the entire body is waterproof. That’s something to be thankful for.
One of the most valuable features is the number of unique channels. With 22 standard channels and 121 sub-channels, you can choose your presets and bounce to an open chalnnel as needed. This is huge when in the sidecountry or within range of other parties.
Lasty there’s good news on the downfall of all outdoor electronics: battery life. BC Link radios come with a solid battery, strong enough to keep your channel open for up to four days in extreme cold. After using BC Links for over two years, I have never had a battery die unexpectedly, even in severe cold.
So there you have it, a vital safety tool for winter adventures designed and built for what we all love to do. From the handheld interface to size and durability to bomber battery life, the BC Link Radio is the best in backcountry communication.

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