arc4520483

arc4520483

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Jacob's Passions

Hiking & Camping

Jacob's Bio

arc4520483

arc4520483 wrote a review of on December 28, 2012

4 5

Tons of organization make finding stuff on the trail simple. The shoulder straps and back are the same as my favorite Talon pack I use for backpacking, the straps are ventilated and have a little stretch to them so it doesn't restrict movement while leaning into berms or getting off the back bombing downhill. The hydration bag is ok, still prefer Platypus. The pack is heavy for Osprey, I'd never use it for long hikes, but is fine for biking. My only gripe, I wish the magnet was moveable so I could adjust better to put the tube on the left side, I hate having the tube hang across my whole body like how it comes out of the box, too much in the way for mtb. Still gets 4 stars despite the weight and magnet because the magnet is a great idea and works fairly well on either side, and the weight is comparable to most hydration packs out there, just not as light as Osprey can be (44L Talon weighs about the same and has a frame.)

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arc4520483

arc4520483 wrote a review of on April 30, 2012

5 5

I've been using a tiny bivy solo for years and the Fly Creek looked so luxurious in size and was actually lighter so I had to give it a whirl. Price is insane for a solo tent, I snagged one on sale and got mine a hundred bucks cheaper which lessened the blow and convinced me to finally get it. By far the most spacious solo tent I've used, it fits me and my full grown boxer pooch, or me and my 5 year old son comfortably, or all of us a little crowded. In crowded campsites the front door setup with the vestibule lets me sit up with my legs hanging out and change without flashing anyone, and is roomy enough for my boots and other gear. I had serious concerns with the lightweight material holding up, especially since I put a hole in the pole bag the first time I put the tent away. Mostly camping in the desert southwest, there is no such thing as a campsite free of rocks or debris as most manufacturers tell you to set their tents up. After many trips now setting it up on rocky gravel areas, even with my dogs paws stomping around in it with me, and a few trips with no ground sheet, the tent has no rips or holes. It has held up in 40 mph winds no problem. I have yet to test it in the rain. What I love as much as the lack of weight is the size it packs down to, it's crazy small. The only complaint is the need to stake the corners at the feet to get the full amount of space. It still counts as freestanding but I'd trade the ounce or two weight of little legs coming off the pole to make it fully freestanding to keep me from trying to pound stakes into the desert floor. Overall, money well spent, and light enough that I never have to second guess whether or not I want to haul a tent or chance the elements.

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arc4520483

arc4520483 wrote a question about on February 2, 2012

How does the Maestro compare to the Rab Infinity in terms of warmth/function? I'm looking for a puffy for an Alaska trip in February, that will also double as camp chillin warmth in desert winter trips/sierra 11k+ summer trips. All the bells and whistles on this one look perfect, but I'm worried this is a bit warm for anything after the Alaska trip.

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arc4520483

arc4520483 wrote a question about on September 12, 2011

I've read about concerns/issues with durability with this jacket. I'm looking to lighten my load from fleece midlayers and it doesn't get any lighter than this.

I would like to use it as a summer alpine/desert winter insulating layer for in camp and a light bring along to wear at the top while peak bagging, and possibly as added warmth under a soft shell to/from work on colder days. So given those requirements, will this ultralight hold up, or should I move up to the slightly heavier MontBell jackets?

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arc4520483

arc4520483 wrote a review of on September 6, 2011

5 5

I got this as a light option for low mountain summer trips and winter desert trips than my trusted 15 deg bag. I wanted a light synthetic because I do a lot of kayaking trips and like the extra piece of mind. I get cold easily at night and never intended to use this anywhere near the 32 degrees in its title, but after the first couple of trips I was pleasantly surprised.

When you first pull it out of the ridiculously small stuff sack it looks pretty unimpressive, thin, and by looks alone I wouldn't think it was possible to keep you warm on even 75 degree night. This little piece of magic far exceeds its looks though.

First few trips had lows around 60, I was perfect all night with the side zips down and top half pulled back. On into the summer I decided to try it out on a trip to 12,000' with temps in the rainy low 40's, I had doubts and went to sleep with a baselayer and beanie. 20 minutes later the baselayers came off. Recently I got bold and took it on another summer trip a little higher with lows just below freezing (I know this because my water bottle froze), knowing I would have the extra layers as backup, but they were not needed. Light baselayer and beanie and stayed toasty again, I've had 20 degree bags that couldn't keep me comfortable like that, and all trips were using a cheap Walmart foam pad.

My only slight gripe would be the zippers getting caught easily even with the little guides along the zipper, nothing horrible, and if you're going slow it's mostly avoidable. For a warm synthetic bag that's under 2 lbs that's an easy tradeoff. A lot of reviewers had issues with the stuff sack, but mine works great. It looks flimsy but I crank it down all the way every time expecting it to come apart and it hasn't.

What does all this jabbering mean? It's a great bag that does more than I thought possible and will now be in my pack for the majority of my adventures.

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