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Alan Klackner

Alan Klackner

Los Angeles

Alan Klackner's Passions

Snowboarding
Climbing
Biking
Hiking & Camping

Alan Klackner's Bio

Father, Husband, Climber, Cyclist, Boarder, Opinionated Idiot. :D

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on June 22, 2015

Mixed feelings
3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I picked up the 200' length to start doing some local canyons with friends.

This rope handles well from day one. Some ropes will feel very stiff, especially when brand new and can be difficult to tie/tighten/dress properly. This rope took and held a clove hitch tightly without any fight.

The bright color, as many have noted, really stands out in photos but also shows dirt readily.

Smooth/fast on rappels, actually a bit faster than I expected @ 9.6mm compared to other ropes I've used in the 9mm range. Be prepared to add some additional friction.

Perhaps best marketed for dry canyons.

Dry treatment didn't seem to work very well, at least on the rope I received. Looking at the Everdry designation it appears to be a sheath only treatment. In practice the rope held a surprising amount of water and would ring out like a sponge on every rap after it got into some water.

44% sheath mass keeps weight down but will likely be less durable over time compared with heavier options with over 50% sheath mass.

Edelweiss lists materials used as Polyamide\Polyester. It makes sense that this means they are using a polyester sheath with nylon(polyamide) core. Nylon stretches more and is slightly stronger than polyester so this makes sense in a dynamic rope. However, Polyester absorbs less water, retains its strength better when wet, stretches less, and is more abrasion and UV resistant. I've seen at least Imlay and BlueWater, but likely other manufacturers offer canyon specific ropes with polyester core and sheath improving suitability to wet canyons.

This rope should serve my needs for now but in the future I'll look into a lines with polyester sheath and core.

Photo: My wife navigating one of the raps in Little Santa Anita Canyon.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on June 12, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 185 lbs

After finding the Paramount Convertible years ago I'm hooked. I now have at least 3 pair.

I love smart flexible layers, these are exactly that.

Biggest standout is the slightly heavier weight material , feels much more durable and provides a touch more warmth on a cold morning.
Fantastic that they come in length options

Otherwise all the benefits of other convertibles, full coverage for sun, wind, or in cooler temps, open the knees a bit for some ventilation as things warm up, or strip them off and use them as running shorts that actually have a place for your keys, phone, and wallet without feeling constricting.

Due to heavier weight fabric they may take a little longer to dry but are also warmer when damp/wet than more standard lightweight nylon.

No stretch so I like to size with a bit of room, internal belt takes care of the rest but still maybe not ideal for something acrobatic like bouldering.

Cloth belt has low profile and goes all the way around (not just sewn at sides) but can get twisted inside the channel and is a pain to get untwisted then. Plastic buckle a bit larger profile than needed and might contact a backpack buckle but haven't had one fail.

I've also had to repair some seams that have failed due to abuse, nothing a needle and thread can't take care of pretty quickly. I've only damaged the actually material on a pair of these once (dropped the legs but let them sit at ankles not realizing they had slid below the heel so got the business side of my boot for miles, patched that up too :D )

A bit less around the town friendly/clearly outdoor design

NF has tried several pocket designs over the years so make sure to check out the model you're getting to make sure they are what you want, some years I've liked, others not as much. (NF if you're listening I prefer jean style[more horizontal] hand pockets not ones that open on the seam [more vertical] that make it awkward to get into :D)

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on June 12, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 185 lbs
Size Purchased: 44.5

Getting older comes with some interesting changes, widening feet being one of them.

Recently picked up a pair of these since I noticed the toe box in my trangos started to bang/rub at the pinky toes a bit this year.

These have the extra width in the toe box I was looking for and I'm honestly not sure who made these first but seem to be the Trango S EVO in most other aspects.

I've only had them out a few times, perform as expected and experienced with the several pairs of trangos I've owned and worn out.

I did notice the lacing hooks were crimped very tightly initially and led to some issues when lacing (sitting at ground level 1/2 in tent with shell pants, so lacing where you can't see them), just hard to catch and seat the lace well. Opening them up with a flat screw driver just a touch resolved (careful not to open too much or they could catch brush/etc. hiking.

Take semi-auto/hybrid crampons fine.

From experience with others, be careful with the synthetic leather lacing loops, I've ripped one (stitching actually was what failed, I think) on an old pair of boots, really cranking down.

Yet another piece of gear has us all looking harlequin. I actually really like a touch of bright color but when every piece of clothing seems to come in different colors and then change schemes with each year model its getting to be a bit much.

If you're new to this boot style, things you'll want to be aware of:
-No insulation means this isn't ideal for long days in snow (though for some this will work fine, and there are ways to extend, like super gaiters and/or vbl liner socks).
-These are pretty stiff (don't expect to roll through your foot) but will break/wear in over time. This means crampons will be great at first and hiking miles will be tough, at some point you'll notice they flex more then they probably should for serious crampon use but hike much better.
-Super lightweight if you're used to leather boots.
-Mulaz outsole can get a bit slick on polished wet granite but really if its wet and smooth who's surprised you have to pay closer attention to foot placement?
-Some will say they're great at nothing trying to be right for everything. I say if you're used to flexing at the ankle (welcome to mountaineering), don't expect/want a lot of soft cushion (leads to fatigue anyway), and accept they aren't going to last forever (want forever durability buy plastic boots, but you better be strong) you'll like them, I do.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on June 10, 2015

Perfect for 2 man mountaineering trips
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The tent is fantastic for mountaineering trips where you want to cover ground and push yourself. If you want to setup, spreadout and dig in grab a MH Trango.

Light weight!!! At 2.5lbs the only thing significantly lighter would be an emergency blanket.
The least condensation of any 4 season tent I've used single or double wall. Even in temps barely below freezing we both stayed completely dry, vents were kept open but not wide.
Its tight but not too small, it fits my parner (6'+) and I (5'10") on xtherms (one wide, one regular) We keep packs, boots, and most everything but water, small essentials, and some snacks outside.
Slider guy line quick adjusters worked well, then again so do many knots which could then be rigged as needed but would require a bit of thought.
Watch the direction of pull when you guy it out if you try to pass thought the center from the pole guy point it will create slack sides (pulling the poles toward the center)

I have the model that uses toggles to secure the poles in place, these can be tough with cold/numb fingers and I understand that's improved on the 2015 model.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on June 10, 2015

Sweet mountaineering bliss
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Very light!
Switching from an old 85L helped drop my winter pack weight from 85lbs to 50lbs.
Carries 50 lb load comfortably.
Impressive freedom of movement.
Hip belt pivots from central attachment (standard shoulder straps).
Great size has held everything I've needed for 3-4 days.
Seems like it will be durable.
Easier to secure and access equipment than my partner's pack due to strap system.

Disappointed that the lid is fixed on shoulder strap side, prevents full expansion.
No removable bivy pad.
I have no idea what the nylon loops on the shoulder straps are, maybe for racking gear, but since they aren't rigid would be very clumsy.
Gear racking loops on the shoulder straps like on their Triolet 30L would be great.
Waist pads seemed short/barely reached my hip crest but waist strap would have fit someone nearly 2x my size. Has still carried the load comfortably though. Same experience with Triolet 30L so not an MBS issue.
Depending on length of piolet/tools I had to be extra careful setting the pack down or sitting with it on as the point could extend beyond the bottom of the pack.
To get max utility from the strap system you have to really think through how to set everything up and experiment.
Would be nice if the green highlights were yellow so they look better with other gear including my K Pro Gore shell from them.

Photo is of me with pack compressed down on a summit day.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on June 10, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 185 lbs
Size Purchased: XL

When I play I sweat, just the way it is. Big soppy mess that's me.

Fleece jackets would frequently get too warm, are heavier, don't compress much, and are frequently too absorbent. Best planned as a mid-layer due to complete lack of wind resistance, but this means you're wearing a shell too so not great to depend on for active wear.

Shell jackets become a sauna when on the go. Save them for the coldest/most insistent wind or rain, their hoods will also seal you off from the rest of the world.

Softshell jackets seem to combine the the best and the worst of shell and fleece jackets with less flexible utility than separate pieces. You'll likely still want to carry a waterproof shell and maybe a lighter sweater when you need a touch of warmth working hard, all increasing overall pack size/weight.

Down jackets lose all functionality when they get wet and most have no resistance to moisture from inside even if they do have dwr treatment outside. Save them for sitting around when you have kitchen duty or otherwise can't move around to keep warm.

The Atom is my perfect go everywhere layer.
Great balance of wind resistance where I want it but highly breathable where the heat gets dumped.
Synthetic insulation is warm, remains warm when wet, and dries quickly.
Water resistant (treated) exterior panels will shed a light shower.
Functional hood that is less "crunchy" around the ears so you might actually be able to hear your partner when its up.
Crazy light.
Packs to roughly the volume of a 1L nalgene, but frequently better not to compress it down and just stuff it around in top of pack then it takes up near zero space, is readily accessible, and can help keep gear dry.
Small and tough enough to stuff in your avy shovel pocket or just under a pack strap and not worry about it until you want it again.
On top of perfect functionality, this piece has worn fantastically. After a year and a half of rock climbs, mountaineering trips, hikes, backpacks, morning warms ups, and cruising around town the only difference I can identify is a bit of that synthetic funk and even that's not really noticeable after a good wash with oxy clean.

A baselayer (selected based on conditions) + the atom + 3L gore shell is my go to system for everything (summer overnight desert trips to spring backpacking to winter mountaineering) below 0F I add my Marmot Ama Dablam (as a mid) for hours running the stove. So far what this system doesn't handle whiskey makes unimportant :).

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on June 4, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Push (with thumb or index) or pull (with thumb and middle finger) the wire gate open, clip through inner gate, that's it you're clipped, locked, and secure.

No real directional (r/l facing or x-over) limitations, that I've noticed, on single handed clipping, the techniques do have to be modified some due to requirement to open outer gate.

When oriented upside down(rope side of draw) an open outer gate will guide the rope, sling, etc. into the biner.

If the outer gate is released before a rope, sling, etc. is fully clipped through the inner gate, into the biner, the outer gate will hold rope in position. At this point a slight tug will drop the rope all the way through the inner gate.

To unclip, don't get distracted by the outer gate, just open inner gate like any standard non-locking biner (an extra shake or firm flick will ensure you're clear of the outer gate)

Easy to catch/work the gates with even heavy gloved hands, making these ideal for mountaineering teams. (this is less true on the largest Mega, dual solid gates. The Lamda seemed like an all round better belay biner in comparison)

An option for enhanced security at pro even for 3+ person rope team, allowing a bight to be clipped through the gates quickly and single handed (as each climber passes each piece) without stopping to unscrew or release a complex locking mechanism.

This is true of most climbing gear but I wouldn't recommend using them with a partner who hasn't used these before the climb. Think about about the first time you clipped a twist locker. The first few times it just takes a moment longer to work it out. Its so much better to spend that moment on the ground before the climb than while breaking down an anchor when everyone's ready for you to get going.

Innovative and well thought out product so it is hard to complain about price given cost of great engineering and benefit of added safety but.... really its basically a Petzl Spirit with an additional wire gate. An extra $5 per biner (50% increase) seem a bit steep to anyone else?

Compared to other lockers the price isn't really out of range but if Grivel could get this close enough in the price range of non-lockers I think it would receive and deserve overwhelming adoption.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on June 1, 2015

When your run is trail..."optional"
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 185 lbs
Size Purchased: 10.5

Most comfortable running shoe I've ever tried.

I tend to have very moist feet so have fought blistering on arch and toes in other runners, which really kept me from getting into running until now. With these I feel like my running is no longer limited by my feet and can push as long or hard as my cardio will allow. The padding on these is on the firmer side of what I'd tried in the past and has really limited rubbing with each strike.

Typically more of a hiker. I now do a 3 mi. out and back mixed (packed dirt to full volcanic rock) trail run with some pretty steep sections 1-2 times a week at this point (~10min pace run average) with an occasional ~5 mi. street run near my house on the weekend.
Stable with great traction on all terrain I've encountered (can't speak to snow or ice in these but imagine they would do well and handle microspikes better than a standard runner)

Right balance of cushioning to support for me

Flexes well like a runner needs to but provides great protection too

Has performed well on concrete, asphalt, dirt track, grass, mixed trails. I generally try to keep the out of deeper (anything deep enough to come up the sides) mud just because I hate cleaning all the knobby tread which holds a lot of mud.

These have been great specifically for the trail I run which can be very rocky, loose, and steep in sections. The shoes have a large platform for stability and has kept me on my feet even running by headlamp and feel before sunrise. The soles provide great protection against rocks (both toe and under foot)while still flexing naturally with my gait and strike. The sole feels neutral throughout contact without excessive arch cushioning.

After about 50 mi on them the insoles seems to have lost some additional cushion from new and I may look to see if NF sells a direct replacement insole. This pre-mature wear isn't all that uncommon for me though, given my weight (~185lbs), I have to replace my road bike tires pretty frequently as well due to wear from the same. If not available I'll look into a trim to fit replacement insole.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 30, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Like most other expensive gear, I collect sleeping bags.

I picked this one up to try out for mountaineering. I'm a big fan of Sierra Designs and would post a glowing review of their Flash 3 tent if I ever saw it on BC, but not really impressed with this bag.

I get the extra weight comes from the duplication of material and insulation required with the hybrid design but for 800 Down this bag also packs about twice the size of my Marmot Helium (15f)

Used it on a Mt. Whitney climb the first weekend of spring (2015). Temps at UBSL were warm at around 30F and still. My partner and I slept in the MH Direkt 2 (fantastic fast/light tent). Through the night I found I was getting a bit chill. This really surprised me since I sleep very warm and have used my Helium to -15F comfortably (in tent with baselayer as I was here). In the end the issue was that the bag just didn't seal up well and would allow cold air in around the quilt portion.

I've since switched back to my Helium which I typically unzip, layover me and tuck under if there's any cold drafts.

I'll keep this bag for use car camping where weight, pack size, and temps won't really be an issue.

In warm temps the bag is a bit more comfortable than a standard mummy (I'm a stomach sleeper).

Also was caught off guard that there's no insulation at all on the bottom of the bag. While this is a great design given the sleeping pad sleeve ensures your sleeping pad fills that job I would have thought this would have off set the extra weight/bulk of the hybrid quilt design.

Nice attempt but in the end I feel it misses the target enough that standard mummy bags make more sense for the price of this bag.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 30, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Just purchased and have only used a few times but the most comfortable harness I've hung in.

Took a couple lead falls in this at the gym, going for full pump. No bunching, digging, or anything otherwise uncomfortable or sketch.

Wide stiff bands mean more support with minimal padding. Allows for better air flow and you don't feel like you're wearing your couch.

Easy, smooth mechanism for adjusting.

Has stayed adjusted.

No bulky padding to compress/bunch/twist in a fall or hold a bunch of sweat.

Very comfortable when on belay monkey duty. Virtually no bite from leg loops.

No issues with tie in points being small, seems pretty easy to thread both points with 10mm rope or gym's monster auto belay biner.

Takes some concentration to hook a BD Hotwire up to the rear loop while the harnesses is on but it's doable and not an issue with harness off.

I'm not sure how much I'd rely on the rear loop, seems like a heavy weight tag but not much more. I just use for my chalk bag, so not an issue for me.

Due to stiffness of bands it can take up some room in a bag/pack.

Not sure how comfort will be affected as the stiff nylons soften with use.

Likely best suited to sport climbing/light trad routes, so most of SoCal.

I dig the bright colors though with all my other gear ends up with a more harlequin effect if it matters to any one.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 30, 2015

Full coverage or not
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 185 lbs

Great hat.
Option to add the skirt for full coverage fantastic in SoCal sun.
Also perfect for bright days humping it in the snow when the rays are at you from every direction or when a chill wind is up but you're working too hard for a balaclava.
So far every thing but tree sap has washed easily, with a bit of oxyclean for that brand new bright white.
Loosen the cinch strap to catch a bit of breeze or tighten it up if a bit of gust would otherwise send you back to the store.
If you're at the limit and need all the air you can get flip the sun skirt up top and cinch it up to keep it in place.
Easier to run with than sun glasses.
For sunrise/sunset runs no need to adjust/remove/store as the light changes.
Post epic feast or just walking to brunch in the sun, remove the sun skirt and still let everyone know you're down for action without looking ...weirder .

The hat is a touch on the shallow side when compared to a standard ball cap but I've come to appreciate this when working hard as well.

Adjustable in rear with single loop back Velcro strap, this threads through the sun skirt to secure. This can make the rear skirt attachment a bit fiddly, though not bad.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 28, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Good looking cage
Reasonably light
Easy to get bottle in/out reducing chance of a drop during transition
Holds bottle securely (if you want a tighter fit just bend the arms in a little, benefit of a metal cage)

Awkward to mount Lezyne's Micro Floor drive pump.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 28, 2015

Fantastic cold weather base
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 185 lbs
Size Purchased: Large

I use this as a mountaineering base-layer and really whenever else I get a chance to wear it, very comfy.

Its been a great active layer.
Great temp range (have taken to 16F with only Arcteryx Atom)
Manages moisture well
Hasn't retained the funk after a hard effort that synthetics do
Sleeve pocket fits my camera (with some effort)
Not itchy like some cheap wool items.


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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 28, 2015

Hiking, check. Backpacking, check
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Great carrier, more comfortable when active than our Ergo, for both parties.

Once your LO has perfected neck control you're good to go. We used from 6 mos with our son. He was too short at first for the pillow to work well so we would cushion with a sweater or rig some other make shift pillow down below his face.

Came with a plastic mirror that tucks in the hip belt so you can check on your LO without removing the pack.

Lots of cargo space.

Hydration pouch can be hard to get a full reservoir in/out of and will put a good bit of pressure on the pouch.

Carries LO pretty far back so seems to amplify weight just a little bit when compared to equal weight loaded in my normal backpacks but still the best carry option I've tried for hiking/backpacking.

Bulky to store.

Easy to adjust to my wife or I.

(Pictured: my wife and son @ 9 mos backpacking)

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 28, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

My wife and I use one of these for quick accessible workouts.

Having to maintain tracking and form really adds to the workout and is a huge benefit over standard rear wheel trainers.

Its quick to layout and can be stored away easily.

The overall quality is less than I'd hoped but functions fine. No issues with stability or the issue mentioned below of the hinge falling out. Provided caps seem to do the trick. (If you lose a hinge cap, a rubber band wrapped tightly on the end would probably work fine, it just needs to keep the end from falling through the frame no weight should be born by retainer cap). I would think threaded ends with washers and lock nuts would make this over all seem a little better designed but there could be some reason for the push on cap design.


Still makes a good bit of noise, even more with resistance unit engaged, though for us we don't really need to engage it, just shift for resistance adjustment.

Good roller size for avid recreational riders. Seems to be endless resistance to be had within my normal gearing range without need to engage the resistance unit.

The Kreitler fork stand is a nice add, once in a while, if you want a thoughtless workout or to stand on pedals.

Since there's no variation in the roller you will feel your rides more in your "seat". It can lead to early fatigue since shifting contact points or standing off the saddle to relieve is challenging.

Rollers have held up just fine to our use and still do the job without any bearing issues.

It can be more difficult to do all out/HII workouts since it becomes much harder to maintain stability as you get to your limits, this could lead to falling or failure to maintain target intensity.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 28, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Weight: 23 lbs
Size Purchased: 12 Mos

Use one for our 10 Month old on camping/backpacking trips.

He's clearly much more comfortable in this than nylon shelled insulated buntings.

Super cute all bundled up.

Washes well. (bought a white one on discount. Avocado, strawberry, dirt, etc. This bunting has gone in looking like something from the bottom of a dumpster, comes out of the washer looking new each time so far)

Great freedom of movement.

Nice to have the fold over hands and feet. When he's crawling around in the tent he has full access. When its time to go to bed we fold them closed so his fingers and toes stay warm (and can't move around as easily).


Good for SoCal summer nights even at elevation or on the coast. (He sleeps covered with a sleeping bag with me or my wife, but we feel its plenty for cool [~50-60F] damp mornings/evenings on its own.)

Hood stays on him much better than a hat/beanie would.

Just, very soft, fleece material so not ideal for anything that's going to be wet or windy.

Can't really rate sizing since infants vary so much and he's a big boy, but have the 12 mo. size which fits him well. So I'd guess sizing is probably right on if your LO is in 50% height/weight. The neck did seem a bit small when fully zipped up.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 28, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 185 lbs
Size Purchased: Medium

I have the non-HV version of these bibs and I've really enjoyed them.
First thing you should know is they have a TON of compression (probably about perfect to promote circulation and minimize muscle bounce/fatigue on rough road).

I found the sizing was accurate but they feel much tighter than most bib shorts due to the very high compression. For me, with size medium, the leg band falls about where I'd expect with no issues/interference with my knees. (I'm ~33" waist and wear a 30" length inseam pant).

The only pair of shorts I've tried that doesn't bunch or need adjustment during/after even long rides.

The front is a heavier fabric that would likely help block a bit of a morning chill.

Side panels are almost a mesh that helps with wicking and cooling.

Cold black treatment typically feels cooler than even my light weight (bright colored) jerseys in full sun.

Chamois was a bit smaller than I expected so takes a bit of extra care to ensure its right under my sit bones. Once in place I can forget about it and it makes a great interface with my saddle. Smaller size helps before/after the ride by minimizing the diaper feeling of some large/poorly shaped designs.

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Alan Klackner

Alan Klacknerwrote a review of on May 22, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The end up front:
A very, cool stove that may not have a practical purpose. Unless, you need to boil for 3+ people, are comfortable using canister fuel in the temps you intend to operate the stove, and have no interest in alcohol units (last one meaning: you want something you don't have to think about to boil with, need to boil really fast, or you nearly burned your house down playing with matches as a child
Note: total weight with fuel of a well designed/operated alcohol unit will typically be lighter).

The story
I own too many stoves, admitting it is the first step right? :)
I purchased this one as my 2-3 man mountaineering snow melter.
(I know, I know, trust me I know, nothing brings out the hackles like saying you plan to use canister fuel well below freezing. Does so, Does not, Does So, Does not. Now can we move on?)

This setup is quite a bit lighter than my Dragonfly, wind shield, heat reflector, snow stand, 2L MSR alpine pot, lid, pot holder, and fuel bottle.
Admittedly buying a better pot would have yielded about the same weight savings and, arguably, simpler extreme low temp performance required for this job, but what can I say I like to play with new gear.

My thoughts:
I think I like green but you know I'm not...entirely there.
Oh! You were hoping that I'd limit sharing the ones relating to the stove. Here you are then:
It would have boiled several liters of water by the time you read this whole review (you'll read it all won't you? For me?)
Very quiet(silent when compared to the Dragonfly but now my partners want to...talk WTF!)
Works well even in wind
Simpler to hang then stove + liquid fuel bottle (*warning* you should never run a stove in any enclosed space. Now I won't feel guilty if you or your partner(s) wake up dead after burning your stove in a shelter)
Lights and re-lights very easily (more or less any spark will ignite)
Effortless use in 3 season temps and can still be pretty easy to use beyond that.
Very well designed lid, with dedicated steam vent oriented to top when pour spout is down means you, shouldn't (hey, not everyone is smart) get steam burns as you pour.
Lid seals well and is stiff enough to prevent leaks around edges when pouring
Lid hook-seat opposite handle ensures easy single handed pouring, only requiring light thumb pressure on lid to keep lid in place.
Useful, light, incorporated, but removable handle folds and snaps on lid nob to keep kit closed when packed up.
Packs up well with room to store additional small items
Don't expect to simmer. With this bad boy boiling is the game (and it's winning).
In many cases there's little advantage over a well designed alcohol setup run by a knowledgeable individual (Pretty much simplicity and a faster time to boil over weight issue here. Most math shows the weight of canisters and of the total unit negate any efficiency-generated weight savings, *individual comparisons... will vary.)

Ad nauseam:
I have used the pot on a camp fire grate. The pot ended up sooty (it ended up over direct flame when I had to make room for the steaks) but worked great otherwise and still boiled very quickly. Watch the handle / handle mount in this use it seems like it could be sensitive and I'm pretty sure MSR won't warranty if you return a pot with a melted handle mount because you used it with another stove/open flame.

Once you're aware of the temp. considerations of canister fuel stoves there are many tricks to ensure adequate if not peak operation but make sure you're well prepared and practiced, especially if temps are expected to be sustained below 15 deg. F

Recycle your used canisters safely!

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