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Woodsgiant

Woodsgiant

Pacific Northwest

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Scott's Passions

Hiking & Camping
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Woodsgiant

Woodsgiant wrote a review of on May 18, 2010

5 5

I usually don't like boxer-jocks because I have huge quads and they're all skin tight and the legs ride up. Ex-Offico boxers are Ok, but need a little stretching after the dryer to fit me correctly. I saw these at the grand opening sale of a local sporting goods store, and decided to try out a pair of XXL. Loved 'em, and went back to get more a few days later. The fabric is thin but tough, and easily stretches to fit larger legs without that compression short feeling, and still lets the boys get some air without riding up or feeling like a speedo. There is a flap in front, but the thin fabric keeps it from feeling like a cod-piece. For me the waistband is just where I like it at the top of my hips. UA's plain boxers have a 4" inseam and seem like they're made to sit in your arm-pits, so these are a definite improvement. I also bought a pair of the M series mesh shorts, and those fit more like compression shorts since they don't have as much give to them.

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Woodsgiant

Woodsgiant wrote a review of on May 18, 2010

3 5

I bought a pair of these and a pair of the O series from my local sporting goods store to try them out, both in XXL. These are "mesh" shorts, and fit more like compression shorts. I wear them while running or working out, since they provide constant but slight pressure similar to spandex. Fine for working out (under a pair of gym shorts of course), but they feel strange to me under street clothes. The O series is much lighter, softer, and more stretchy fabric. If you've got big quads like me, the extra give in the O series makes them extremely comfy under street clothes.

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Woodsgiant

Woodsgiant wrote an answer about on November 30, 2009

BD's website instructions (http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/uploads/black-diamond/files/MM6017_B%20NRG%20IS_WEB.pdf) doesn't mention the power compatibility, but at the first glance at the picture I see interchangeable plugs for countries that provide 240VAC power through wall sockets. Without tech specs to support it, I'd feel safe plugging it into 240. Although you can always order it and read the plug itself, and return it if it doesn't support 240. Gotta love Back Country's policies for things like that.

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Woodsgiant

Woodsgiant wrote an answer about on September 16, 2009

http://media.suunto.com/media/suunto/manuals/en_US/X10_usermanual_EN_v3_m56577569830772287.pdf

Did you try a search for the online product manual? Page 22. Self-help is a wonderful thing.

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Woodsgiant

Woodsgiant wrote an answer about on June 30, 2009

Check the Brunton website for these things, and you'll see that they claim the 7.5 or 15 can charge a laptop by itself. However, the rolls should act like any other battery, in that you can increase voltage by connecting them in series, or amperage by connecting them in parallel - i.e. two of the 3.4s should yield 11 volts DC at .5 amps or 1 amp at 5.5 VDC. You need to look at your power adapter and do the math to figure out what you'd need. If you're going to try to connect two $200 rolls together, you should really do some research into circuits first, if you don't already know what you are doing.

Keep in mind, as these actually AREN'T any other battery, the standard disclaimer of "SHOULD" doesn't mean that it will. Tinker at your own risk and don't blame me if you loose your eyebrows and your solar roll.

So what ARE you doing with a laptop on the trail?

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Woodsgiant

Woodsgiant wrote a review of on June 15, 2009

5 5

I'm 6'5" and usually brush 270lbs. This was one of the few hammocks I could find that had a weight rating over 250lbs, and didn't have horrible reviews. I was skeptical at first, but after I took mine camping I went back online and bought the whole "One-Link" system. This hammock not only held my big 'ol butt up in the air (after some creaks and groans from the suspension system settling), but was more than long enough for me to relax comfortably with a camp pillow. I stayed in it for over 4 hours, rocking and reading, and never felt like I was going to get dropped. The only downfall to this hammock is that the fabric isn't wind-proof, so for a cool windy day you might want to lay a blanket between you and the hammock. Customer service at Backcountry and ENO's website are both fantastic as well.

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