William C Clark

William C Clark

Alaska Range, Alaska

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William's Passions

Telemark Skiing
Nordic Skiing
Camping
Backpacking
Trail Running
Hiking
Paddling
Yoga
Road Cycling

William's Bio

Enjoying the out of doors since 1979.

0 Comments

William C Clark

William C Clark wrote a review of on October 17, 2011

5 5

This is my first HRM, and I dove into this one for two reasons 1) its supposed ease-of-use and 2) Movescount. It is easy to use! And the Movescount website will be right up your alley if you are nerdy, mathematical, or stats minded. I love keeping track of my progress through a month. With only 3 buttons on the watch it is quick to learn, so the interface is not frustrating. The Movescount interface is easy, too. I run and ski a lot at night: the only thing I'd change is when the HRM is engaged and you use the light, the backlight flashes to save battery. This is difficult for me to read whilst running. Otherwise, I love everything about this watch. And in the black color it is the perfect blend of casual but dress-up (for me) watch. By the way, the sidebar description says it has an altimeter: IT DOES NOT HAVE AN ALTIMETER.

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0 Comments

William C Clark

William C Clark wrote an answer about on March 16, 2011

Judging by your parents, how much heavier do you think you'll get in the near future? Ski length is principally based on skier weight. Because you are young and athletic you want a ski you will grow into, not out of; I recommend a 177cm. They may feel long at first, but if you're athletic, you will dominate them soon enough. Picking poles: the point where the strap attaches to the handle should be between your chin and lower lip. Go lower lip if you think you only have another inch in ya.

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William C Clark

William C Clark wrote an answer about on March 16, 2011

Mark, for the price this is a very solid ski. Light, fast base, good construction. To upgrade from this in the Fischer line you'd have to pay considerably more (+$200). These are narrow, but I have found them to be quite stable. At your weight and ability you should be on 192cm. Do not worry about binding compatibility - first worry about getting the most comfortable boot! Once you have the boot get the binding that fits it. The previous answer mentions a plate. This is wrong; there is no plate. Some skis come pre-mounted with the NIS plate to slide bindings on. This is irrelevant with these skis as they do not have the NIS plate.

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William C Clark

William C Clark wrote an answer about on March 13, 2011

Is this a question? First, the terms "no wax" or "waxless" skis does not mean the skis do not require wax! It just means you have a textured area underfoot that allows you to propel forward and you do not need to apply a sticky (kick) wax to accomplish forward movement. However, it sounds fishy what the shop told you. I've worked in a shop many years and this sounds like a classic case of too small skis. If you weigh too much for your skis you will constantly be flattening its camber and dragging the textured, underfoot section. It is like driving with the emergency brake on, you can do it, but it is inefficient.

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William C Clark

William C Clark wrote an answer about on March 13, 2011

These are okay for off trail in deep snow, not the best. They are 65mm wide at their largest, which is still fairly narrow. It would depend how often you plan to be off trail, the type of terrain and your athleticism. If you plan to be off trail more often than not, I would suggest the Salomon XADV 69 Grip - a bit wider platform for better stability in deep snow conditions. Also, you may want a partial metal edge (neither these nor the Salomon have a partial metal edge). If you plan to mostly be on trail, these are a good choice.

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