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West Howland

West Howland

Water, whether it's liquid or solid, salty or fresh, white or blue is where I'll be.

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Weston's Passions

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Kayaking

Weston's Bio

I'm driven by exploration. It's not so much the destination, be it a surf wave, a shore break, or a spectacular view so much as what it takes to get there. I love the logistical details involved in expeditions, and enjoy getting out and seeing what it takes to get somewhere new rather than just keeping to what I know.

West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on July 26, 2011

I would have to disagree with the two previous answers. Having spent a lot of my time setting up and taking down camp in the rain, keeping at least the body of your tent dry can be a huge part of keeping the rest of your setup (pad, sleeping bag, clothing, etc) dry. Setting up the fly, then floor, then body (in that order) makes this do-able. If the inside of your tent gets wet, everything that touches it will follow suit. If more of your stuff stays dry, the happier, warmer, and lighter you and your gear will be especially with a down sleeping bag.

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on June 24, 2011

40 degrees generally refers to the temperature at which the bag is rated to be comfortable (or to survive) and the "down" is what the bag is filled with. This bag is filled with 800 fill down (a specific size/weight/insulation value of feathers) as opposed to being filled with a synthetic insulating material such as polarguard. Does that help?

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on November 24, 2009

It would work for either, just be sure to rinse the salt water as well as any sand, grit, gravel, or gross nasties out of it before you store it. The biggest drawback with it in open flat water would be that it will catch wind like a sail and can become hard to maneuver...

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on November 24, 2009

Generally speaking, ocean-going kayaks are designed to be long and narrow for the sake of following a straight line, and speed. This kind of inflatable boat has a huge amount of surface area above water opposed to what's below so it will be tossed around by any amount of wind you'll encounter. Also probably won't be the most comfortable for long periods of time out on the water. There isn't really anything to "apply" to make a boat an ocean kayak, it's all about the design.

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on November 23, 2009

You may be able to get something custom fit at a local shop, however there are other boats out there that come designed specifically for a rudder. There are a couple other considerations when installing a rudder aside from just mounting it on the back. Take a look at a P&H Orca. Or possibly a sit on top kayak specifically designed for fishing. Sit on tops are generally much easier to fish from because they are more stable and cannot easily sink if overturned. Just climb back up and keep going.

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on November 19, 2009

I have successfully used unleaded (regular, mid, and premium), diesel, and kerosene, along with the standard white gas. works great, just doesn't burn quite as cleanly during startup.

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on November 19, 2009

The number of kayaks you can get on your roof is dictated by the length of your load bars. If you're looking for two sets of Hullavators (one for each side) you'll want a set of at least 58" bars.

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on November 19, 2009

A lot of times, back pain can result from incorrect posture as well as the kayaks outfitting. when you're paddling it can be very helpful to keep your feet on the braces and pushing to keep your back against the seat back in order to have a "dinner-table" posture. To answer your question, this seat does have decent support, however posture has a lot to do with back pain as well.

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on November 19, 2009

This boat falls under the category of "sit-on-top" kayaks. One of the pluses for this style of kayak is that they are very stable, and in the event of a capsize, they are very easy to climb back on top of. The structure of the boat is hollow with few openings into the inner chamber. And to answer your second questions simply, it would be very difficult to sink this boat. However if the front hatch (gray and black rubber piece) is not secured properly, the boat could sink more easily.

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West Howland

West Howland wrote an answer about on November 14, 2009

It depends on what activity you're doing with it. This jacket is relatively lightweight and is a simple, no frills jacket. It would work well for rafting, whitewater kayaking, sea kayaking, sailing, or just about any other boating you might be interested. This jacket is a unisex jacket so it will fit both men and women well, however women may be more comfortable in a jacket with a little more sculpting like the Kokatat MsFit.

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