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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit

The Western US, based out of Montana.

Anthony's Passions

Mountain Biking
Mountaineering
Alpine Skiing
Sport Climbing

Anthony's Bio

Climb, ski, bike, surf or any combination of the four and I'm happy.

Just pour the hot water right into your instant oatmeal packet. Works like a charm and no dishes to do after.

Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote an answer about on July 13, 2011

The basic idea is that the smaller the number translates to how fast you can pedal the bike down a hill, and the bigger the number translates into how easy it will be to grind up a hill.

The fewer teeth there are on the smallest cog, the longer it'll take you to pedal out of your gears. For example, running a 36t front chainring with a 11t smallest cog in the rear will basically make it so you won't spin out as fast as with a 12t rear cog. In other words, you'll be able to pedal your bike to a higher top speed because for every one revolution of your cranks with an 11t rear cog, your wheel will revolve 3.27 times (36/11), whereas with a 12t rear, your wheel will revolve 3.0 times (36/12).

The tallest cog - the bigger number - translates into how easy you can make your gear ratio for climbs. For example, say we're running in the small ring in the front, a 24t. If you've got the 11-21 cassette, your biggest gear in the back will be 21t, and your easiest gear ratio will be 1.14. For every revolution of the cranks, your rear wheel will rotate 1.14 times. Thats not an easy gear to climb a steep hill with. If you're running a 11-34t cassette, then that changes to 0.71 (24/34), a much, much easier gear to climb with.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote an answer about on July 13, 2011

Yep. All the SRAM X stuff works together for the respective speeds. All the 9-speed X5, X7, X9, and X0 shifters and derailleurs work interchangeably. Same thing goes for the 10- speed stuff. You just can't mix the 9-speed and 10-speed stuff together. The 9-speed uses 1:1 Actuation, and the 10-speed stuff uses Exact Actuation.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote an answer about on June 25, 2011

You got it on the second part. The Stylo OCT 2.2 and 3.3 crank arms are identical. They just bolt different rings to them. The chainlines for the smallest two gears on the 2.2 are going to be the same as the chainlines for the smallest 2 gears on the 3.3.

That being said, I'm running this Stylo OCT 2.2 in a 2x10 drivetrain and it works perfectly fine. It pedals great, shifts flawlessly through the gears, and it doesn't wear on the cassette or chain any faster than any other setup I've run.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote an answer about on June 7, 2011

Other sites list this wheelset as having a QR adapter. That means that you'll be running a 15mm hub and have the ability to use the included 9mm QR adapters to run a 9mm front hub.

Those wheels in the photos (as of today) are also Centerlock wheels. Again, the other sites have this wheelset listed as being Centerlock hubs with 6-bolt adapters so that you can run either Centerlock rotors or standard 6-bolt rotors.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote a review of on March 21, 2011

4 5

This thing is awesome. It's everything I hoped it would be and more.

Only reason it's 4 instead of 5 stars - the sizing is strange. I wear, almost universally, a medium everything. I'm 5'11, 165#, and a relatively athletic build. I sized up to the large for this jersey, which provides *just* enough looseness around the chest and armpits so I can breathe uninhibited. Anything smaller, and I wouldn't have been comfortable on my bike.

I'm interested to try this out as a base layer for other adventures.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote a review of on February 22, 2011

5 5

Sure, a lighter will run you $0.49 at the gas station, but there's something really gratifying about opening a beer post-ride using your bike. If only SC could design a hanger that poured the beer for me, too.

And, yeah. It holds the derailleur pretty well, but I don't think that's the point here.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote a review of on August 2, 2010

5 5

It's not the best trail bike, it's not the best race bike, it's not the best hucking bike.

It is the best bike for doing any kind of riding really, really well.

Depending on the build, you can literally do any type of riding on this frame. It's a light enough frame to be built up as an XC-ish machine, but burly enough to be built up as a gravity sled. Or, you can do what I did with the frame and go for an all-around, do-everything bike.

Only gripe with the frame is the zerk fittings on the lower link. I broke one, and it was a pain in the ass to get the part of it still in there out - it took a lot of swearing at and fighting with the broken fitting before it came out. My opinion is threaded zerk fittings, not pressed ones, would be better. In any case, big thanks to Santa Cruz and its awesome customer service for hooking me up with some free replacement fittings.

For those who are stuck between the LT2 and the Nomad, here's the basic take-away: If you're more climbing-oriented, get the LT2. If you're more descending-oriented get the Nomad.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote an answer about on May 25, 2010

Your best bet is to go into a shop and see what is comfortable. Get someone who's ridden a bit to help you get on the right size bike. It really doesn't matter what brand you look at - you can just compare the geometry to this bike. In all honest-to-goodness, I'd say the top tube length is the most important number to look at, followed by the standover, then headtube angle. Find out what you like, then come here and get the bike.

Another thing to keep in mind is your own preference on sizing - some people like smaller bikes on the trail, some like larger. Based on what your height, and assuming you have a normal reach (how long your arms/torso are), I'd say you could safely go for the 18". However, you might consider the 16.5' of 19" frame, just depending on your pants inseam (for the standover), your reach, and how you like to ride.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote a review of on December 6, 2009

5 5

I don't even know where to begin with this one. The beacon is sweet, the bag is sweet, the probe is sweet, the shovel is sweet. For some reason, it doesn't come with the space blanket like the some of the other Mammut packages. But I'm happy enough with the rest of the gear that I didn't even flinch when I realized it didn't come with.

The beacon - Long story short, I really hope I don't have to use it, but if I do, I'm sure glad I've got it as opposed to anything else.

The probe is really long, and relatively light. Honestly, if I have ever have to use this thing to it's full extension, I'm probably going to be digging someone out of a HUGE avalanche. Most burials are in 6 or less feet of snow. That's probably why BCA is coming out with shorter probes now.

The shovel is great - good extension, lightweight, and the handle is big enough for my hand with a large ski glove.

The backpack is really great. Hydration pack compatible with insulated hose holder, really comfortable, lots of pockets, easily collapsible for lift riding, but still big enough (just barely) to fit a pair of boots (read: size 12 Sportiva mountaineering boots) or a helmet and all the avy gear, plus lunch, a puffy, and some odds and ends. Couple gripes with the bag, though. If you look at the pictures, there are two zippers that have straps going over them. It makes it a bit of a pain to open at times. There isn't a clip in the top of the bag that holds the hydration pack. Last gripe with the bag is that the waist strap seems like it was designed for a person with a 60" waist. Holy crap, even with gear, I've got an insane amount of extra nylon hanging there. Nothing scissors can't solve, though.

All in all, I'm super stoked to be skiing with this gear.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote a review of on November 5, 2009

4 5

Solid and light - noticeably lighter than my BD nuts, and just as strong. The CNC machine work is beautiful, too. Honestly, they are a little nicer than the BD nuts for some placements - not all, but some. Mostly the ones where you have to hold onto the end of the loop and fish the nut way back into a crack to get to a good constriction. With my BD nuts, there have been the one or two random times that the nut head pushed up on the cable while trying to make a placement, which usually leads to lots of panicked swearing and cursing about how much I hate trad climbing.

On the flip side, you cannot do the aider trick of hooking the cable and cinching up the nut against a bolt without a hangar with these bad boys. Losing that cable loop is not the end of the world, but it is something to take note of.

4 out of 5 only because you spend more on this set of 10 nuts than on the BD set of 13 nuts, and the BD jobs come come with a racking biner. If shaving the grams is worth the premium to you, then these should be your choice.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote a review of on November 2, 2009

5 5

But if I do (and I really hope I won't), what I'm using to find my buried friends is super easy to use and incredibly accurate. In the search mode, it practically inspires confidence - I will find anything emitting at 457 hz quickly and efficiently. In the guaranteed panic that follows a slide, that is invaluable to shave precious seconds from the rescue. Simply put, using this beacon (in conjunction with training, practice, and knowledge) is amazing and worth every penny. If the search mode is any testament to the capabilities of this thing, I'm willing to bet that the "Transmit" mode - you know, in case it's me who gets buried - is just as amazing.The only downside I can think of with this beacon is that now that I've got a Barryvox, all my buddies want to drop in before me. In case they get buried, they want me looking for them. Looks like I'm getting 3rd or 4th tracks down the mountain from now on.

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Tony Zammit

Tony Zammit wrote an answer about on June 7, 2009

You can use this wheelset for DJing, but it probably wouldn't be a very good idea - it is not what this wheelset was designed for. You wont get the same durabilty banging these around on jumps as you would with a DH/FR/DJ specific wheelset. In addition to the wheels listed above, another great wheelset that won't break the bank you should check out are the Azonic Outlaws. They're strong, relatively light, and come in all kinds of colors.

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