Todd Cox

Todd Cox

Utar!

Todd Cox's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Running
Paddling

Todd Cox's Bio

Never trust a boat with a motor, sports that're played with balls, or anyone that tells you they know how to operate a motorcycle.

Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on May 16, 2011

4 5

I got two red ones recently because they were cheap, then read other Todd's review. Sure enough if you get the M, then squash it flat you get a lot of compression and a shape that packs very naturally into a pelican case/saddlebag/trunk. They're not quite as versatile as a basic sack for stuff you can't squash but for anything you can flatten this is a big winner. The Medium size is pretty big already, I have to assume the orange is hugenourmous.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on July 20, 2010

5 5

We bought the Gore Pass 3 to use as our traveling tent to use on the motorcycle and in the car. We took it on a 2 week trip around the west and used it in everything from pouring rain to hot as hell high desert. This tent delivers.

First and foremost, it is big inside. Genuinely a three person tent with lots of internal space. We had enough room inside for two people and all our motorcycle gear.

The big thing we really love though is the thoughtful design. All sorts of awesome little touches. It's hard to see in the picture but each of the four corners has a mesh vent with a little prop that holds it open. Those vents are an epic win. We had great airflow and minimal condensation for the conditions. The two vestibules are great and they each have a full sized door. When we were cooking in the sun near Durango we discovered that the rollup side has extra stake loops and shock cords on the corner sections and the rollup door, so that you can either use the big center as your door or one of the smaller corners as a door. Roll back both corners and you get superior air flow without much sun hitting the inside.

Setup is a little funky the first time so don't neglect the all-important "set it up once in the yard" step of new tent ownership. Big Agnes has some very clever clips and hooks and so forth that work extremely well but are mysterious at first if you've only ever had clips and sleeves. The new generation of aluminum hub poles this tent has are WTF light and go together very slickly and smoothly. It's basically a bit four-footed primary structure with two crosspoles that pop into little plastic claws and help create the big internal space.

Only downside I might see would be repair. This tent has 4, count them, 4 kinds of fastener doohickies. It is unabashedly over designed but extremely solid and the most livable, comfortable, enjoyable tent I've ever traveled with and lived in.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on March 25, 2009

4 5

Overall a great stand. This is the first work stand I've ever owned and it does a hell of a job. It's got a ton of adjustment, and once you figure out the technique isn't hard to set up or stow away. I like the big honker clamp's adjustability for grabbing different size tubes for different bikes and different work. My only real complaint with it is the finger-chomper push releases on the legs. You have to push real hard to get them to disengage and they inevitably pinch the ends of your fingers when you operate them.

It holds the bike very solidly when deployed and occupies relatively little space when collapsed. Assembly isn't too bad provided you RTFM.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on March 17, 2009

4 5

This is my standby present for nieces and nephews. The compass is basic but effective and relatively bulletproof. The book can get a bit dry for really small kids in places, but older ones can readily be sent out for the afternoon with book and compass and relied upon to get home (which speaks highly for the book) and relate their harrowing 2.5 mile navigation adventure.

For an adult looking for a basic grounding in navigation the book is fantastic and easy to read. The compass is, as noted above, sufficient but un-sexy.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on March 2, 2009

5 5

Never going back to anything other than Big Agnes bags. This bag is comfy, packs ridiculously small if you use an inflatable pad (and you should!), and is really well put together. I've used it open in hotter conditions, closed and battened down in cold conditions, and most things in between. Your choice of pad is VERY important in the warmth of the bag so choose smart (I favor the Exped Synmats). My only serious complaint with the bag is that the bastard zipper loves to get jammed on the draft flap when you're zipping up from inside.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on January 19, 2009

2 5

Got two, for myself and girlfriend. Both of us have found that they aren't super thermally efficient. The Bike ride to work or school (me-motor, her-legs) is enough to take the contents to lukewarm status. Lukewarm coffee is a crime against nature.

The design is generally good with the clickly top being obnoxious to clean but easy to use, and the size is just right.

The "meh" insulation is total dealbreaker though. I'm already shopping for something better.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on August 28, 2008

5 5

This sucker is the most-used item in my gear closet. Great on a bike, on the motorcycle, hiking, skiing, you name it. It's that "just right" size for a daypack that you can get your food and layers into it, while still having the mesh stretchy bit and the bungees for random crap you find or have to carry for your useless buddies with their little weenie camelbaks. The Nalgene reservoir is the bomb as well. Super Super good design that the pack is built around. Buy one, and laugh at the dudes lugging gigunda "daypacks" up the hill.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on December 4, 2007

5 5

I've got a pile of headlamps because I'm a nerd, but the Yukon HL is the standby one that I keep coming back to because it's just so darn good at everything. The high beam is blinding out to about 30-ish feet, and the triple ring of little LEDs fills nicely without being quite so horrifyingly bright.

I love having short and long range options on the same lamp. If you change the batteries before a multi-week trip you can forget about them until you're back home. It's tough as heck too. I've been bashing it around inside hardcases, backpacks, and pockets for years, and have dropped it a stream, down a rocky embankment, and onto about a hundred different kinds of dirt. It's still going strong.

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