Todd Cox

Todd Cox

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Todd's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Running
Paddling

Todd's Bio

Never trust a boat with a motor, sports that're played with balls, or anyone that tells you they know how to operate a motorcycle.

Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on June 8, 2011

5 5

This vest has become my go-to midlayer in the 2 months I've owned it. It's longer than I expected which seemed weird at first but actually turns out to be nice if you're outside doing crap where your hands are above your head. The pockets are extremely big which is also nice. I'm not sure if you'd be able to fit skins into them but they'll cheerfully swallow multiple wrenches.

It's also pretty bomber. Due to stupidity on my part the vest blew out of my sidecar outside Moab last week, at which point my friend following promptly ran it over. I went back, picked it up, dusted it off, and was good to go.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on May 16, 2011

4 5

I got two red ones recently because they were cheap, then read other Todd's review. Sure enough if you get the M, then squash it flat you get a lot of compression and a shape that packs very naturally into a pelican case/saddlebag/trunk. They're not quite as versatile as a basic sack for stuff you can't squash but for anything you can flatten this is a big winner. The Medium size is pretty big already, I have to assume the orange is hugenourmous.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on July 20, 2010

5 5

We bought the Gore Pass 3 to use as our traveling tent to use on the motorcycle and in the car. We took it on a 2 week trip around the west and used it in everything from pouring rain to hot as hell high desert. This tent delivers.

First and foremost, it is big inside. Genuinely a three person tent with lots of internal space. We had enough room inside for two people and all our motorcycle gear.

The big thing we really love though is the thoughtful design. All sorts of awesome little touches. It's hard to see in the picture but each of the four corners has a mesh vent with a little prop that holds it open. Those vents are an epic win. We had great airflow and minimal condensation for the conditions. The two vestibules are great and they each have a full sized door. When we were cooking in the sun near Durango we discovered that the rollup side has extra stake loops and shock cords on the corner sections and the rollup door, so that you can either use the big center as your door or one of the smaller corners as a door. Roll back both corners and you get superior air flow without much sun hitting the inside.

Setup is a little funky the first time so don't neglect the all-important "set it up once in the yard" step of new tent ownership. Big Agnes has some very clever clips and hooks and so forth that work extremely well but are mysterious at first if you've only ever had clips and sleeves. The new generation of aluminum hub poles this tent has are WTF light and go together very slickly and smoothly. It's basically a bit four-footed primary structure with two crosspoles that pop into little plastic claws and help create the big internal space.

Only downside I might see would be repair. This tent has 4, count them, 4 kinds of fastener doohickies. It is unabashedly over designed but extremely solid and the most livable, comfortable, enjoyable tent I've ever traveled with and lived in.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote an answer about on September 14, 2009

Um, not exactly, no. It's one big honker bag with two pad sleeves (the sleeves are the uninsulated bit on the bottom.) If for some reason you had two pads and wanted a really huge not very heat efficient single bag, you could use it solo. If you don't have both pads in it though you'll have some SERIOUS draft and conductive heat loss issues.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote an answer about on June 24, 2009

How to make the nikwax work properly:

1.)Goober up both gloves a bit with the wax.
2.)Put on both gloves
3.)Rub that shit in by walking around the house doing your best Bond-villain hand-wringing impression. Make sure to rub in the goop that inevitably gets in between the folds on the back, and rub between the fingers.

This method keeps your hands clean and makes sure both gloves get it evenly.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote an answer about on March 25, 2009

Actually, you can get the bike to hang vertically on it. The clamp is BIG and has a lot of adjustment, along with tension crank that lets you set it at a particular angle. It's not hard to set it up to clamp a tube other than the seat post and hold the bike vertical. The tricky part is balance. You've either gotta have the pivot near the center of gravity of the bike or tighten the crap out of the clamp rotator. I generally alter the tilt of the bike several times while I'm working and the stand does fine. I don't know that I'd trust it vertical for long term storage but for short term messing around (back wheel removal anyone?) you can totally mess around with orientation.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on March 25, 2009

4 5

Overall a great stand. This is the first work stand I've ever owned and it does a hell of a job. It's got a ton of adjustment, and once you figure out the technique isn't hard to set up or stow away. I like the big honker clamp's adjustability for grabbing different size tubes for different bikes and different work. My only real complaint with it is the finger-chomper push releases on the legs. You have to push real hard to get them to disengage and they inevitably pinch the ends of your fingers when you operate them.

It holds the bike very solidly when deployed and occupies relatively little space when collapsed. Assembly isn't too bad provided you RTFM.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote an answer about on March 19, 2009

If you're looking for "safely" you're pretty much stuck getting touring bindings. The thick sole w/ rubber on AT boots means that if you jam them into a binding not designed for it you can no longer trust the release.

Extra Bux properly Releasable Binding > Saving money with Releasable Leg

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on March 17, 2009

4 5

This is my standby present for nieces and nephews. The compass is basic but effective and relatively bulletproof. The book can get a bit dry for really small kids in places, but older ones can readily be sent out for the afternoon with book and compass and relied upon to get home (which speaks highly for the book) and relate their harrowing 2.5 mile navigation adventure.

For an adult looking for a basic grounding in navigation the book is fantastic and easy to read. The compass is, as noted above, sufficient but un-sexy.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote an answer about on March 16, 2009

Boot sole lengths are all over the map by brand, so there's no easy sole length rule of thumb I'm aware of. Unless you're way the heck up at the top end of the sole length range (like less than 3mm to spare), I'd almost always say go for the smaller binding. You'll save a little weight and muck less with the overall flex of the ski. Being DIN rated means the binding has to have the same quality of release behavior regardless of the length it's set to.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on March 2, 2009

5 5

Never going back to anything other than Big Agnes bags. This bag is comfy, packs ridiculously small if you use an inflatable pad (and you should!), and is really well put together. I've used it open in hotter conditions, closed and battened down in cold conditions, and most things in between. Your choice of pad is VERY important in the warmth of the bag so choose smart (I favor the Exped Synmats). My only serious complaint with the bag is that the bastard zipper loves to get jammed on the draft flap when you're zipping up from inside.

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Todd Cox

Todd Cox wrote a review of on January 19, 2009

2 5

Got two, for myself and girlfriend. Both of us have found that they aren't super thermally efficient. The Bike ride to work or school (me-motor, her-legs) is enough to take the contents to lukewarm status. Lukewarm coffee is a crime against nature.

The design is generally good with the clickly top being obnoxious to clean but easy to use, and the size is just right.

The "meh" insulation is total dealbreaker though. I'm already shopping for something better.

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