Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros

Bellingham, WA

Dave's Passions

Snowboarding

Dave's Bio

Snowboard
Split Board
Mountain Bike
Road Bike
Kiteboarde
Snowmobile

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on March 17, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Vibram Sole, look at that beast, wicked aggressive sole. Pretty awesome if you are going to try and cheese grate them on a snowmobile running board, or plan on doing a lot of mountaineering. I was able to toe into a pretty significant ice layer when boot packing, something most snowboarders would leave a skier to do in hard boots. Furthermore they fit crampons well, so there is no drama. There is however a little down side, well or upside?..depending how you look at it. The sole stops short of the heel, toe and the sides. The actual soft boot kind of hangs over the sole, but why? Leverage, on a skin track you will be able to hold a better sidehill/traverse for sure. Consider it like a binding riser on a ski binding, the taller the binding, the more leverage. Same principal with this boot, however I found that when stomping landings the boot had a tendency to roll forward in the binding. So it actually like pivots/rocks a little under high stress. It is not the worst thing ever, something you have to decide is worth all the other benefits, but the first time it happened I almost went over the bars. Cranking down your bindings will not resolve this?? Trust me. Oh almost forgot, centering the boot is a little tricky because the sole being smaller than the actual boot, but just take your time.
Sizing, I measure a 31 mondo, I rocked a 30. Size down one full size if not 1.5?? The boot will pack out half a size anyways.
I think that is it, the boot has a large profile, seems to be on the fatter side, but they last. Just make sure you are looking like sasquatch below the knee and you should be all set.

Stay safe and keep it going.

Tiny Monks.

(0)

 

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on March 17, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I gave the Deeluxe spark boot a go, figured with the bell to bell resort days, extensive spiltboard suffer festing, mountaineering, and snowmobiling this boot would do it. It looks burly, has a Vibram sole AND is used by Xavier D.....so they gotta work for what I am doing. See the breakdown from below:
Thermoflex Liner, all boots are heat 'moldable' so why Thermoflex? Cause it ACTUALLY molds to your foot. This is not a do it yourself plug and play boot heat set up. Find a shop that does ski boot fitting, pay the 40 bucks, and have them get you dialed with pressure points and the like. Thermoflex liners are amazing, they offer excellent conformity to your foot for support and comfort.
Lacing System, the lacing system is standard pull/lock set up. I found that holding the clip and pushing down on it as you relieve tension on the lace was the best way to get the hold. They hold well, didn't break free, partially due to the power strap at the top taking the majority of pressure away from the actual laces.
Power Strap ? the Deeluxe boots are suited more for people with LARGE calves. If you have a skinny lower leg profile, stay far away from these boots. Reason being, the boot will need to be closed far too much than it is designed for, causing a loss in effectiveness of the power strap, ultimately leading to lace slip. If you are mega calves man, this is your steez.

Stay safe and keep it going,

Tiny Monks.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on August 22, 2012

5 5

Travis Rice Pro Horespower Series Review

Recently, I got a chance to take out the new 2013 T. Rice HP. I had the deck for about 7 riding days to give her the beans and maybe attain 15% of what it’s purposed owner (Travis Rice) could achieve.

Riding the 2010 TR HP for 2 years, I was eager to see what was new. Immediately, huge differences just strapped into the 2013 at the top while developing the hot lap plan with the hombres. The board was flexible, FAR more flexible than the 2010……exploring that feeling a little more, the board flexed really well torsionally and almost stopped at a certain point, sort of locking. I looked up and the guys were bailing out, and I was still standing there. Looking at my feet, like I have never seen them move before……it was pretty funny.

The first session (high speed groomer/roller boosting) I am doing tricks on this board (Day 1) that I never attempted or could nail down on my 2010 T Rice HP. You know a lot of people say: “Oh things don’t really change all that much in 2 years” and this statement may be true. However, that statement is merely a proponent of what company you are with……cause the changes I noticed from Lib Tech, were considerable.

Travis Rice Lib Tech Splitboard is on SALE – 25% OFF!!!

The longitudinal flex on the 2013 TR HP is great, the nose and tail are WAY softer than the 2010 ……but it’s not a noodle. The 2010 just felt like a rock solid deck. You couldn’t feel the snow or receive input coming through the board, bindings, and into the boots. Some boards have a very dominant terrain feedback that transfer into the boot (Burton Channel System), but the 2013 just feels smooth. Not enough to feel everything, but enough so you aren’t feeling like riding on a thick plank, like the 2010. The softer longitudinal flex pattern makes it easier to crank sharper turns (makes a tighter arc) and skates through the pitted out chop….bonus.

The 2013 also incorporates what seems to be a progressional flex pattern…….getting stiffer as you get closer to the binding off the tip and tail. Crazy I know. On that nice groomed surface doing presses was awesome, not even really possible before with the 2010. Tail press to backside 180, front side 180 with a nose press slide halfway to switch, wheelies over rollers, surface backside 180 nose slide to 360 finish (normally powder trick)…..I won’t lie, as a rider I was reborn, re-energized. All this used to just be ideas, thoughts, ambitions, and now I was nailing them down the first day out on the 2013. Crazy thing is the softer nose/tail still has snap/pop to it. You can flex it to a point (loading) and there is stored energy there to pop you up after. Same goes for airing into a press, it lets you down easy on contact, holds, and then waits till you are ready……POP!

Torsionally it’s a mad man. I mean for hard charging, torsion stiffness it is a must. The board allows for great torsional flex up to a certain point and again locks down, preventing further flex. My 2010 felt rigid, you knew it was a stiffy when you rode it. It really did not do much unless you brought it up to speed and really worked it. The 2013 doesn’t behave that way, it’s friendlier at lower speeds, and great on surface tricks, but has no sacrifice of rigidity and strength when you want/need it. Hard charging is where it’s at, and to have a board which responds so well to true big mountain freestyle minds and supports that hard free riding addiction is…….. Well it’s a quiver killer.
All this sounds good right, but what about the float, what about the white room? First off, I am rocking this board with a size 13 hoof, experiencing zero toe drag on the 164.5 cm. So for the general public the deck platform is wide enough for anyone. I can only think back to riding the Burton Joystick in Utah last year, I rode it centered on a 20″ dump day and swamped the nose constantly. Riding a lot of switch I want my board stance centered and riding the same either direction. Fully geared up (back pack included) I stand 6’4″ tall and weigh 250…..and with a centered stance (set at the widest distance apart) with this board shape (C2 BTX) I never swamped the nose, once. The rocker in the center provides a swimming capability to the nose, making it easy to break to the surface and plain out in deep snow. What does Travis ride? His board excels in deep snow.

The boards are handmade and the HP is out of all sustainable materials lacking fiberglass, resins, etc. With this design, the 2010 HP was extremely susceptible to temperature change. At 8 degrees the board was FAR stiffer (even more than usual) than say at 25 degrees. I mean all boards change a little with the temperature variation, but I experienced some pretty dramatic differences in flex with the 2010. Well the 2013, I did not experience anything out of the ordinary, not sure what changed, how they did it, and I actually shot them an email asking: “How’d you do that?!?!” If I hear back, I will certainly update it out here for you all.

In summary: If your attitude and aspirations are that of a freerider, big mountain freestyle assaulter, who likes to be 18 and jib a little……scoop this thing up. There will be zero disappointment. If you are a street, rail, jibbanator…..go with something else that is more defined for you riding style, you will perform better.

Stay safe out there, be with your friends, and keep up progression.

(4)

 

0 Comments

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on August 22, 2012

5 5

Travis Rice Pro Horespower Series Review

Recently, I got a chance to take out the new 2013 T. Rice HP. I had the deck for about 7 riding days to give her the beans and maybe attain 15% of what it’s purposed owner (Travis Rice) could achieve.

Riding the 2010 TR HP for 2 years, I was eager to see what was new. Immediately, huge differences just strapped into the 2013 at the top while developing the hot lap plan with the hombres. The board was flexible, FAR more flexible than the 2010……exploring that feeling a little more, the board flexed really well torsionally and almost stopped at a certain point, sort of locking. I looked up and the guys were bailing out, and I was still standing there. Looking at my feet, like I have never seen them move before……it was pretty funny.

The first session (high speed groomer/roller boosting) I am doing tricks on this board (Day 1) that I never attempted or could nail down on my 2010 T Rice HP. You know a lot of people say: “Oh things don’t really change all that much in 2 years” and this statement may be true. However, that statement is merely a proponent of what company you are with……cause the changes I noticed from Lib Tech, were considerable.

Travis Rice Lib Tech Splitboard is on SALE – 25% OFF!!!

The longitudinal flex on the 2013 TR HP is great, the nose and tail are WAY softer than the 2010 ……but it’s not a noodle. The 2010 just felt like a rock solid deck. You couldn’t feel the snow or receive input coming through the board, bindings, and into the boots. Some boards have a very dominant terrain feedback that transfer into the boot (Burton Channel System), but the 2013 just feels smooth. Not enough to feel everything, but enough so you aren’t feeling like riding on a thick plank, like the 2010. The softer longitudinal flex pattern makes it easier to crank sharper turns (makes a tighter arc) and skates through the pitted out chop….bonus.

The 2013 also incorporates what seems to be a progressional flex pattern…….getting stiffer as you get closer to the binding off the tip and tail. Crazy I know. On that nice groomed surface doing presses was awesome, not even really possible before with the 2010. Tail press to backside 180, front side 180 with a nose press slide halfway to switch, wheelies over rollers, surface backside 180 nose slide to 360 finish (normally powder trick)…..I won’t lie, as a rider I was reborn, re-energized. All this used to just be ideas, thoughts, ambitions, and now I was nailing them down the first day out on the 2013. Crazy thing is the softer nose/tail still has snap/pop to it. You can flex it to a point (loading) and there is stored energy there to pop you up after. Same goes for airing into a press, it lets you down easy on contact, holds, and then waits till you are ready……POP!

Torsionally it’s a mad man. I mean for hard charging, torsion stiffness it is a must. The board allows for great torsional flex up to a certain point and again locks down, preventing further flex. My 2010 felt rigid, you knew it was a stiffy when you rode it. It really did not do much unless you brought it up to speed and really worked it. The 2013 doesn’t behave that way, it’s friendlier at lower speeds, and great on surface tricks, but has no sacrifice of rigidity and strength when you want/need it. Hard charging is where it’s at, and to have a board which responds so well to true big mountain freestyle minds and supports that hard free riding addiction is…….. Well it’s a quiver killer.
All this sounds good right, but what about the float, what about the white room? First off, I am rocking this board with a size 13 hoof, experiencing zero toe drag on the 164.5 cm. So for the general public the deck platform is wide enough for anyone. I can only think back to riding the Burton Joystick in Utah last year, I rode it centered on a 20″ dump day and swamped the nose constantly. Riding a lot of switch I want my board stance centered and riding the same either direction. Fully geared up (back pack included) I stand 6’4″ tall and weigh 250…..and with a centered stance (set at the widest distance apart) with this board shape (C2 BTX) I never swamped the nose, once. The rocker in the center provides a swimming capability to the nose, making it easy to break to the surface and plain out in deep snow. What does Travis ride? His board excels in deep snow.

The boards are handmade and the HP is out of all sustainable materials lacking fiberglass, resins, etc. With this design, the 2010 HP was extremely susceptible to temperature change. At 8 degrees the board was FAR stiffer (even more than usual) than say at 25 degrees. I mean all boards change a little with the temperature variation, but I experienced some pretty dramatic differences in flex with the 2010. Well the 2013, I did not experience anything out of the ordinary, not sure what changed, how they did it, and I actually shot them an email asking: “How’d you do that?!?!” If I hear back, I will certainly update it out here for you all.

In summary: If your attitude and aspirations are that of a freerider, big mountain freestyle assaulter, who likes to be 18 and jib a little……scoop this thing up. There will be zero disappointment. If you are a street, rail, jibbanator…..go with something else that is more defined for you riding style, you will perform better.

Stay safe out there, be with your friends, and keep up progression.

(3)

 

0 Comments

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on August 22, 2012

5 5

Check these out! Pick any angle and they look siiiiiiiiick. From the side, you get a huge burly spire (Bigger than Cartel), a low profile/minimalistic strap design, and a thin almost hairline looking high back. Hit it from the back, and whammy! An ergonomically designed swooping high back flaring inward of stance position and clear coated with a carbon layup. Throw a little paint up in there to highlight it up and add some style, makes me wonder how I slept at night before owning a set……..

Who in their right mind would need these? Isn’t it just a glorified Prada handbag mounted to a snowboard? Well everyone has their quirks and it takes ALL kinds of people to make the world go round, but lets dissect the reasons. First, this is the stiffest binding Burton makes (laterally/toe to heel) I mean look at those spires at the center of the foot bed. Longitudinally, the Diode allows your board to flex under your feet; providing that Burton EST feel/riding experience on any deck out on the market. Burton achieves this with their RE:Flex technology, essentially creating a disk that can pivot/flex in the center. Oh yeah, the carbon fiber. Carbon is a fantastic material when implemented properly, it is light, super durable, and never loses its strength as it is flexed. Think of a coat hanger, when you bend/flex it back and forth continually it eventually snaps, right? Well carbon doesn’t weaken upon flex, its strength is constantly retained. Even plastic is susceptible to weakening, but it is far better than metal.

The Diode is new to Burton in 2011-2012 and developed as sort of a hybrid. Hybrid because Burton took their C60 and CO2 binding attributes, combined them, pumped out the Diode, sun setting the CO2/C60 platforms. Currently, the only bindings I am riding are the CO2 and C60 (from 4 years ago) so the Diode is definitely in that ball park of what I am riding currently. Additionally, I have never owned a Prada handbag before and really curious if these things came with chromed out screws……

Shipping them ground was a bad idea, if I saw another FedEx truck around my home town I was going to freak out. It is like the moment I ordered them they put in a distribution center next to my house, it was painful. When they finally arrived, it was Christmas in November. The box is SO light, I felt like I you could chuck the box over my house. Naturally, I dropped everything I had going on and mounting the Diodes on my board was top priority.

Mounting these up (15/-15) was easy. Standard Burton protocol, lift base pad, slide toe ramp, insert disc (flexi, it is cool), screw down plate, snap down base pad, and done. Now to the high back adjustment, take a close look at the design….there is no stopper block/post for the high back to rest on the heel cup. Adjusting these took me about an hour, getting the high back parallel to the board edge (at 15 degrees that SHOULD not be this hard) and then dialing in the forward lean. This was a fine tuned process. Burton uses these rings painted on the high back as kind of your guide for forward lean, it was a struggle. I ended up getting it close, then moving the high back one notch at a time in the side of the binding to get it perfect. I overlooked it though, small price to pay for such a nice handbag. Figured it’s a one time adjustment and you are done with it…..and no, the screws were not chrome.

Finally on the snow, these things were tough. I felt like laterally I had the control of a metal binding, it was great. So fun to carve, really set a hard edge, and heel side (with the forward lean) it provided immediate power transfer. The binding stuffs the board edge into the snow, makes the snow pretty much eat it. Can’t say busting huge 180′s off rollers wasn’t fun, my overall set up was a feather light. You can go huge with these, the Diodes provide great energy transfer for pop, and super light where you could whip the board any which way you wanted. Yeah, I was definitely smiling that day.

After a few sessions……that was when everything started to unravel.

Burton is kind of known for their cushy straps that are super comfy. The minimal design on these and how thin they are, I was CRANKING them down to get enough pressure and then my feet definitely lost blood flow. The toe cap strap isn’t trimmed out with rubber on the inside either, foam?!?! Yeah, that’s right foam…..short cut to save weight. Additionally, on my third session I broke the high back, the thing blew out and busted like a twig. Now, Burton 2 day shipped me a new pair once I called them (which is legit) but now I had to go through the process of adjustment again. For the sake of everyone’s time, I am going to break down in a less narrative description…..and get to the summary.

High back – Yeah it is stiff, great. But it is not strong, the adjustment is a nightmare (due to lack of post support), AND it broke! The key word in this story is, Carbon COMPOSITE……all the look of Prada AND it’s lack of functionality. I couldn’t trust it either, so I bought an extra set (Cartels) to bring on my 2 week backcountry trip. Furthermore, the high back on the back foot came lose constantly……just from moving it down to get on lifts and up to strap in. Then the forward lean would get out of whack (high back would slam to lowest position) and I had to adjust them again! I will say though, by the fifth time…..I started getting pretty good at adjusting the high backs.

Straps – Okay minimalistic, save weight, I get it. They are not comfortable and provide no added support to the boot. It makes the system more dependent on boot stiffness for toe side carving and if you rely on your binding for added toe side power by virtue of the strap, forget it. Oh yeah, the foam……well obviously a durability issue and the thing was already starting to peel away after about five sessions.

Base Pad – I understand design and looks, but those holes are ice magnets. Trying to sweep the snow out of it is impossible. The holes fill up, freeze and you the ice build up on the foot bed begins. I was using the ratchet strap to chip the ice out of the base pad. The holes and design on the high back, no problem…..but that design on the base pad was a mistake for sure.

RE: Flex Disc – The beginning was great, the disc was strong, made of a Carbon/Nylon Composite. After riding it and stressing the disk, it got spongy. The base plate broke in and lost a lot of rigidity longitudinally. Just moving my knee inward and flexing while standing strapped in, I could pick up the side of the binding enough to slide a Nestle chocolate bar under it. Not ideal, it compromises your ability to provide input to the board. The Burton EST is the way to go if you want the board flex under foot concept. The screws are on the outside of the bindings which prevents this lifting from happening and gives you 100% input longitudinally into the board. You can presses like a king with that system……but with the RE:Flex, not so much.

Personal recommendation – If you are the fair weather, ski with friends, noon beer type snowboarder personality, don’t really care about fine tuned adjustments and performance; this hand bag is for you. However, if you demand and expect solid execution of design/technology and performance because snowboarding runs deep within your veins…..pump the brakes. Burton has a lot of figuring out to do with the Diode and it shouldn’t be at your expense with the price tag of $400. Cause at 400 bucks, this thing should be making you coffee in the mornings.

If you ARE looking for a stiffer/aggressive binding and want to stick with Burton, I suggest going for the standard disc (non-RE:Flex) Cartel……you’ll get the cushy strap, rubber toe cap, strong spires, stronger disc, and beefy high back. Additionally you can take that $150 bucks in savings and get a coffee maker.

Stay safe out there, be with your friends, and keep up progression

(1)

 

0 Comments

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on March 25, 2011

5 5

So I am torn on this one but reality is reality so I have to deal with that. This boot rides really well, it offers flex but only to a certain point.....then kicks in suport where you need it. Definitely a big mountain boot for sure, even though when you flex it initially it feels soft. Well done on DC's part for sure. The boot kills it.

HOWEVER (and this is where the reality kicks in) it does not fit like other DC boots.........like at all. I have a narrow foot, high running calves and thin shins and ankles, and a flat instep (bridge of foot). This is pretty much on par or the exact geometry that DC boots cater too, but the status is different. The Status does not cater to this shape at all. IF YOU ARE wide footed, have a big instep and calves that run lower in your leg or thick shins......this is your boot.

I rode these for a day and my foot was washing inside the boot like crazy. I am bummed, even though I enjoyed the flex and performance, the fit is not right for me. When going back country and hiking, it would not serve me well with the room I had, blister central.

IN CONCLUSION - Awesome performance of a boot, just make sure it fits your body geometry. If it does, I highly reccommend it.

(1)

 

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on March 25, 2011

5 5

So I am torn on this one but reality is reality so I have to deal with that. This boot rides really well, it offers flex but only to a certain point.....then kicks in suport where you need it. Definitely a big mountain boot for sure, even though when you flex it initially it feels soft. Well done on DC's part for sure. The boot kills it.

HOWEVER (and this is where the reality kicks in) it does not fit like other DC boots.........like at all. I have a narrow foot, high running calves and thin shins and ankles, and a flat instep (bridge of foot). This is pretty much on par or the exact geometry that DC boots cater too, but the status is different. The Status does not cater to this shape at all. IF YOU ARE wide footed, have a big instep and calves that run lower in your leg or thick shins......this is your boot.

I rode these for a day and my foot was washing inside the boot like crazy. I am bummed, even though I enjoyed the flex and performance, the fit is not right for me. When going back country and hiking, it would not serve me well with the room I had, blister central.

IN CONCLUSION - Awesome performance of a boot, just make sure it fits your body geometry. If it does, I highly reccommend it.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on March 25, 2011

5 5

So I am torn on this one but reality is reality so I have to deal with that. This boot rides really well, it offers flex but only to a certain point.....then kicks in suport where you need it. Definitely a big mountain boot for sure, even though when you flex it initially it feels soft. Well done on DC's part for sure. The boot kills it.

HOWEVER (and this is where the reality kicks in) it does not fit like other DC boots.........like at all. I have a narrow foot, high running calves and thin shins and ankles, and a flat instep (bridge of foot). This is pretty much on par or the exact geometry that DC boots cater too, but the status is different. The Status does not cater to this shape at all. IF YOU ARE wide footed, have a big instep and calves that run lower in your leg or thick shins......this is your boot.

I rode these for a day and my foot was washing inside the boot like crazy. I am bummed, even though I enjoyed the flex and performance, the fit is not right for me. When going back country and hiking, it would not serve me well with the room I had, blister central.

IN CONCLUSION - Awesome performance of a boot, just make sure it fits your body geometry. If it does, I highly reccommend it.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Tiny Mo Pros

Tiny Mo Pros wrote a review of on March 25, 2011

5 5

So I am torn on this one but reality is reality so I have to deal with that. This boot rides really well, it offers flex but only to a certain point.....then kicks in suport where you need it. Definitely a big mountain boot for sure, even though when you flex it initially it feels soft. Well done on DC's part for sure. The boot kills it.

HOWEVER (and this is where the reality kicks in) it does not fit like other DC boots.........like at all. I have a narrow foot, high running calves and thin shins and ankles, and a flat instep (bridge of foot). This is pretty much on par or the exact geometry that DC boots cater too, but the status is different. The Status does not cater to this shape at all. IF YOU ARE wide footed, have a big instep and calves that run lower in your leg or thick shins......this is your boot.

I rode these for a day and my foot was washing inside the boot like crazy. I am bummed, even though I enjoyed the flex and performance, the fit is not right for me. When going back country and hiking, it would not serve me well with the room I had, blister central.

IN CONCLUSION - Awesome performance of a boot, just make sure it fits your body geometry. If it does, I highly reccommend it.

(0)

 

0 Comments