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Sean P.'s Bio

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ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 18, 2012

I can't tell you the exact weight but I can recommend this ski for touring. It has Rossignol's WRS (weight-reduction system) which basically consists of using lighter source materials in the structure of the ski. It's not a heavy ski, not a beast of a ski by any means, but definitely stable while having a fun and lively flex pattern. Remember, if the ski is constructed too light it won't ski very well (unless it's made of carbon fiber) because you lose stability and dampness when you go ultralight. This ski is a perfect balance of lightweight-minded construction while still having enough meat to it to ski properly. I highly recommend it for touring, general west-coast resort use, and backcountry booters. Hope that helps!

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 16, 2012

Go for the 180cm. It may seem a bit long at first but you will get used to them, and your technique will probably improve from it! You'll get more float and stability out of the longer length as well.

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 9, 2012

The 178 Gotama is probably plenty long for you - if you're 5'9", a 178 will be just about head height. The 186 might give you maneuverability issues in the trees. At your size, I'd only go 186 if you're planning to do lots of straightlines and minimal turning.

As far as your other options go, the Kung Fujas and Shoguns are excellent all-mountain skis for the west coast. I'd avoid the Czars, though, as they are more freestyle specific and less practical for the all-mountain use you described above.

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 9, 2012

I use a 20L to carry a highly compressed sleeping bag, pad, thermal base layers, and a few other misc items, with plenty of room to spare, so I think the 20L could handle your two sleeping bags and some clothes. You could go for the 35L to be on the safe side - if you don't fill it up, the extra material rolls up into the top so it shouldn't take up too much extra room.

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote a review of on July 8, 2012

5 5

I have used the Sweetwater purifier extensively while backpacking throughout Utah. It works great in the swift rivers and high alpine lakes of the Uintas and also the trickling creeks and remote waterfalls of Coyote Gulch and Dark Canyon. On average I can efficiently pump about 3 liters in 10 minutes after a fresh cleaning. You need to clean it about once every 9 liters or so. Its easy to clean, easy to store, easy to pack up, and easy to carry. Five stars and I highly recommend this thirsty backpacker's best friend!

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 8, 2012

I don't have one on-hand to measure for you, but I'm fairly certain Line is one of the "truer" brands when it comes to reporting length. The "shorter" brands are Rossignol and as of last season K2. If you really want to know the straight tape pull length of the 172 you can chat in to a Gearhead and they could probably research it and email you back!

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 7, 2012

These skis have pretty dramatic tip and tail rocker so they are going to ski shorter than they measure. I'd say go right for the 193cm, unless you plan to go with the AT binding and do a lot of touring, in which case you probably want to cut down on weight and improve maneuverability and would thus go with the 185cm.

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 7, 2012

Its true that skis with rocker/early rise tend to ski a little shorter than they measure, since they have less active edge. If you're an aggressive skier you probably would have been fine on the 170cm, but I don't think you're doing too bad on the 162cm. In my opinion, this is one of the best women's-specific skis out there for aggressive female skiers.

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 7, 2012

I'd go for a Salomon STH16 with a wide brake or a Marker Jester with a wide brake. Not positive but I believe the Jesters mount wider between the screws, thus giving you that wider-specific setup you're looking for.

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote an answer about on July 7, 2012

Yes. Pretty much all Smith goggles have interchangeable lenses, including this model. This goggle comes with one lens, and you have a couple of options. Your best two choices are the Sensor Mirror and the Ignitor Mirror. Sensor is better for low light, but still works in partly sunny conditions. Ignitor is better for sunnier days, but is still universal enough to work when it's overcast. Hope that helps!

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote a review of on July 7, 2012

5 5

I just got out of the Uintas from a four day backpacking trek with this shirt. I used it as my primary day-time top. It is a dream come true for the type of shirt I like to wear while backpacking or even just day hiking: two velcro chest pockets for storing map, compass, snacks, camera. Snap buttons for easy on/off and opening the chest up when it gets really hot. Sleeves can roll up easily when its warm and have a little snappy loop to keep them rolled up. Collar can be popped for extra bug/sun protection. Material is extremely soft, light, quick-drying, and legit bug-proof. Didn't get a single bug bite through this material the entire trip, even when I was hanging out next to a high alpine lake infested with mosquitos and biting flies. This shirt layers nicely too, with a base layer underneath and a synthetic puffy and/or rain coat on top when temps drop/rain happens. This shirt is now my go to for every hiking trip. I plan to wear it until it falls apart (and it seems durable, so it shouldn't happen for a long time) and then replace it with the same model. Five stars, highly recommended!

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote a review of on July 7, 2012

5 5

I got these recently and just finished a four day packpacking trip in the Uintas. I used these as my day-time bottom layer on top of compression shorts. When it was hot I rolled them up capri style, but for the most part it was cooler/raining so I kept them rolled down. Material was extremely light, soft, quick-drying, and bug-proof which made wearing them awesome. Range of motion was slightly limited when wearing them capri-style but it was acceptable, and worth not having to bring shorts and feeling like I wanted to switch between pants and shorts. At night I threw my thermal legging base layer under these and they worked great. I highly recommend these for any high alpine type hikes where you will see cooler temps. I wouldn't wear them in the desert as there's nothing better than shorts when its that hot out during the day. Smaller detail features like the super durable button, built in webbing belt, and many pocket options are icing on the cake. FYI, I'm 6'2" 210 lbs waist size 36 and I bought a size Large which fit just perfect with a bit of tightening on the built in belt.

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ThankYou

ThankYou wrote a review of on July 7, 2012

5 5

I have used the Sweetwater purifier extensively while backpacking throughout Utah. It works great in the swift rivers and high alpine lakes of the Uintas and also the trickling creeks and remote waterfalls of Coyote Gulch and Dark Canyon. On average I can efficiently pump about 3 liters in 10 minutes after a fresh cleaning. You need to clean it about once every 9 liters or so. Its easy to clean, easy to store, easy to pack up, and easy to carry. Five stars and I highly recommend this thirsty backpacker's best friend!

(0)

 

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