TJP

TJP

Green Bay, WI

Timothy's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Snowshoeing
Climbing

Timothy's Bio

I enjoy kayaking, camping, hiking, climbing, snowshoeing, running, and adding new sports/adventures to the list all the time!

TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on January 7, 2011

Jer,
According to ORSsnowshoesdirect, only the binding on the Evo Ascent is garaunteed to accept a ski boot. They recommend hiking or snow boots for the Evo and Evo Tour. This isn't to say you couldn't MAKE it fit, but I don't have the experience to say for sure.

I hope this helps!

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on January 7, 2011

Aaron,

From my experience, you will probably want to go with the 30's unless you are carrying a pack or dealing with really deep and soft snow. My friend an I both own 30's, I'm 172 and he's pushing 210. He sinks noticeably deeper on his in fresh snow, but I don't think he would be comfortable walking on 36's unless he really needed the float. Again, packs and deep snow. If you are a tall guy, maybe I would lean toward the 36s. I wish I could help out a little more, I know it sucks being on the borderline. It happens to me all the time in clothing sizes.

I hope this helps a little!

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on December 14, 2010

Adam,
From the FAQ section of www.OSPREYPACKS.com:
"Which of your packs are carry-on compatible?
In our Travel series, the Meridian 22, Vector 22, and Porter 46 all meet maximum legal carry-on requirements.
Among our daypacks, most of the bags below 40 liters will meet carry-on requirements. Follow the 22” x 14” x 9” or 45 linear inch total for standard carry-on dimensions, or call your airline for specific guidelines."

Of course you could always catch a TSA agent on a bad day or they just might be stopping everyone with a sexy looking backpack that day... My point is that the stays *Shouldn't* be an issue, but you never know these days.

I checked the TSA website for rules on carryon LUGGAGE and this is all I found:
"TSA will screen any "Carry-on" baggage that will fit through the x-ray machine; however, it is up to each individual air carrier as to whether the baggage fits the size restrictions for your flight."
"Transportation Security Officers have discretion to prohibit a passenger from carrying an item through the security checkpoint and onboard an aircraft if they believe the item poses a security threat."

Good luck!

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on December 14, 2010

Barb,
Any snowshoe should allow you to do this if the powder is deep enough. The issue I find is when the crampons snag on brush/rocks/etc as you sled down, but leaning into the rear of the shoe as you descend will keep the toe crampon up higher where it won't snag. Unless he specifically wants a shorter more packable shoe such as this, I might recommend looking into a 30" shoe (such as the Atlas 11 or 12 series, or Tubb's Mountaineers) as the length will also assist in his "skiing."
I hope this helps a little with your decision!

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TJP

TJP wrote a question about on November 29, 2010

How is the fit on this thing? Stoic pictures never really do the product justice, and this image makes this "sweater" look more like a jacket. Does it fit nice and tight for layering? (like the Patagonia or Eddie Bauer sweaters) or is it loose and poofy? The sizing suggests it runs small... Thanks for feedback!

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 24, 2010

Kyung,
I would suggest taking your sleeve and chest measurements and comparing them to the sizing chart (link is right next to the options pull down menu). I would guess that you will be a medium because these sizes are pretty small. At 5'9" 170# I'm usually a medium (occasionally a small) but according to these measurements I should be wearing a large.
I hope this helps.

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 23, 2010

Sue,
When comparing this to the listing on Wilderness System's page, the only difference I am seeing is the updated Phase3 seating. But that could just be chalked up to old stock photos. The best thing you could do would be to click the "Chat Now" link in the upper right hand corner and talk to a live service rep during regular business hours. They can have one of the stockman in the warehouse check the year of manufacture on the boat's statement of origin to confirm when it was made. This will give the exact date the boat was made, though I'm not sure when exactly they started making the boats with new seating according to their website the new boats were available for sale as of October 15, 2010.
I hope this helps.

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 23, 2010

Corkie,
You land on a grey area. If you plan on frequently carrying a pack or dealing with deep powder, then I would say go with the 27" shoe. Otherwise, based on your size and weight, I think you will do well with 23". You fall right in the middle of the weight range for the 23 and you don't want to be tripping over them. That being said, the width difference between the two sizes is only 1/4", so if you're still on the fence, my vote is to always go for more flotation. But that is because I rarely hike packed trails.
I hope this helps a little.

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 21, 2010

Tra,
No, apparently there is a subtle difference in deck design of the classic to the Evo that won't let them fit. Unfortunately Backcountry no longer carries the tails for your older snowshoe. However, they can still be found at ORSsnowshoes. Links:
http://www.orssnowshoesdirect.com/msr_4_inch_flotation_tails.htm
http://www.orssnowshoesdirect.com/msr_8_inch_flotation_tails.htm
I hope this helps.

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0 Comments

TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 20, 2010

Slugs,
As you noted, the key difference is the binding. They also come in different colors and the ascents are 10g heavier. Besides that they have the same traction and construction. These shoes should serve your purposes well, but if you want my $.02 I say go with the more secure binding. If you intend to get serious use of out these things, then you definitely want you foot locked in as solidly as possible.
I hope this helps.

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 19, 2010

Larry,
I'm afraid Backcountry doesn't carry any of the accessories specific to this boat. However you can find them all on Harmony's website (Harmony is a sister company of Wilderness systems).
http://www.harmonygear.com/product/343301/stern_bag_cover_commander_120/_/Commander_120_Stern_Bag_Cover
http://www.harmonygear.com/product/0/bow_bag_cover_commander_120/_/Commander_Bow_Bag_Cover
http://www.harmonygear.com/product/0/anchor_trolley_slidetrax/_/SlideTrax_Anchor_Trolley
http://www.harmonygear.com/product/0/SLIDETRX_WIDE_DASH/_/SlideTrax_Wide_Dashboard
http://www.harmonygear.com/product/0/SLIDETRAX_SIDEBOARD/_/SlideTrax_Sideboard

I hope this helps.

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 19, 2010

CW,
Pitydafoo's review below answers your question; exert:

"One plate nests inside (or outside, depending on pot/plate size) pots just fine. However, this is possible with only one single plate. Plates of the same size have straight walls that are not tapered at the bottom, making it impossible to stack multiple plates inside each other. Maybe MSR will get it right with the next version..."

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 18, 2010

Shannon,
Really any footwear will work, but I would recommend getting something insulated and waterproof. There are many winter boots that are geared towards snowshoeing that include features like heal strap retainers and gaiter rings. A few of these off the top of my head would be the Columbia Bugaboot, North Face Chillkats, or the Merrell Isotherm, but there are many many more.
I hope this helps.

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 18, 2010

Julia,
I'm afraid I don't have outdoor experience with this binding (I've played with it in stores) so I can't really argue for or against it, but I might suggest looking at the Mountaineer series shoe. It is 30 bucks more, but I think it's the best damn binding available on the market. Simple and snug; no buckles to potentially fail. The $30 also gets you a bushel full of extra traction. I am curious though; if someone else would like to weigh in on their experience with THIS shoe I would love to hear it.

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TJP

TJP wrote an answer about on November 18, 2010

Dally,
As a fellow Northwoods hiker, I can tell you there is no such thing as overkill. This shoe is the only shoe that I would consider to be more aggressive than my Tubb's Couloir (replaced this year by simply the mountaineer). Aggressive traction means a word of difference if you plan on leaving the trails behind. I like going out into the woods, finding the steepest hill around, then marching straight up it. If climbing over fallen trees and down rocky escarpments sounds like fun to you, then get this shoe! If this sounds like perhaps it's more work than fun, and you would rather stick to the trails that those damned (*wink* I'm kidding!) CC skiers keep all packed down, then perhaps you could go with something a little lighter on bite.
I hope this helps!

Edit : Heel raisers are a nice option, but I haven't found a hill tall enough to warrant their use in Wisco yet. Maybe if you make it to the porkies in upper Michigan it might come in handy. But then again, I think overkill can be fun :D

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