Sean Macha

Sean Macha

Pueblo Colorado, South Korea

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Sean's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Paddling
Climbing

Sean's Bio

Have had a jack of all trades lifestyle, been everything from a lifeguard to golf course maintainer to bike shop mechanic to EMT.

My most recent work landed me in korea where I decided that my passion for the outdoors needed to develop into a lifestyle (and lifechoice) instead of a hobby.

So I'm venturing to my home of colorado to finish a degree in Outdoor Leadership so I can firmly begin to make a place for myself in the outdoor world.

All time favorite outdoor activity is hiking lakes, streams, creeks and rivers, and anything associated, whether it be kayaking or swimming. I learned to kiteboard in Korea and hope to soon hone that talent on the lakes of colorado.

I believe there is a perfect piece of gear for every activity, and love putting schwag though tests well beyond its intention.

Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on August 19, 2010

5 5

Right now, go get rid of every towel you have ever used, rip them up, burn them, bury them. Then buy some of these, it is the last and only towel you will ever need.

I was really surprised and impressed when I purchased 3 of these towels, small, medium and extra larged. It is really an understatement to say that these towels are absorbant, they are REALLY absorbant, can be run out and used again almost instantly.

The XL is the size of a full size towel and whether at the beach or kayaking has been used by 3 soaked people to fully dry off. The smaller ones are great for dishes, handtowels..etc.

The Towels are really light, pack very small, dry fast, absorb everything. I'm not going to lie, I even have one in my bathroom in the home now, after using this towel, I've never felt dryer.

(1)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on August 19, 2010

5 5

I love this seat in my pack. There are so many things I have ended up using it for, extra spare pillow, seat on rocky terrain, shelf to set things on to keep them off ground, insulating seat on snow.

Best uses are probably protecting your butt from really rocky terrain or really cold terrain (sitting on snow).

Self inflating so no fuss there. Sometimes I actually pack it inflated to use it as a blocker in my pack to aid in sorting. I always take it with me.

(2)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on August 16, 2010

5 5

This pad truly is amazing. I converted to it from a 1.5 self inflating REI pad, that while warm, was the traditional 18inx7in size that those types of pads are. Getting a NeoAir was the best choice I've ever made in regards to sleeping on the mountains.

Size, small...really small, it's not joking about the 1 liter bottle size, before rolling I actually suck whatever air I can back out, then close the valve to make sure I can get it as small as it's intended to go. While it doesn't come with a stuff sack, you probably won't need one, it's small enough to fit into any free crevase in your bag.

Weight, less that a lb, you won't feel it. This is a pretty big weight loss on the bag if you are moving from a self inflating like I did, as those are usually around the 2lb mark.

Durability, I've had it in the tent, I've had it in the sand in korea, the rock banks of the arkansas river in colorado, the bare peaks of the san isabel range, no holes to speak of so far, 2 years and around 40 camps, pad looks great.

Warmth, most will agree the pad is warm to freezing 32F, but there is some controversy in reviews on the 0-30F range. So I can only put my experience.
I personally have been comfortable on this pad in -5F, that was with the pad full inflated, in a -20 down bag, inside a Nemo Moki (expedition) tent. I was perfectly toasty. The coldest I've had the pad on the bare ground the temp was around 30F and I was in a 20F bag and I was warm. Keep in mind if you are the kind of personal to slightly underinflate the bag so it comforms more to your body then you are losing insulation as you are decreasing the distance between yourself and the ground. Best tip, if it's cold, have it fully inflated, and have a bag rated 15-30 degree below the air temp. Everything after that is trial and your own personal taste.

I don't mind blowing it up, it only takes me about 20 second of hyperventilation or 1-2 minutes of casual breathing.

Best pad I've ever had, and I doubt I'll move on to anything else anytime soon.

(3)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote an answer about on August 16, 2010

I agree with everything Livingston said, just a few things to add. I'm not an expert in R value, just experience, and it seems in the sub 20 to below freezing range there is a lot of opinion on the neoair. Some people (myself included) sleep fine around freezing on the neoair, while others recommend a pad underneath. I think a big play on this is the sleeping bag the person has, as well as the inflation level of the pad.

Keep in mind, while some like to underinflate the neoair for some more comformity and comfort, this decreases the distance between you and the ground thus decreasing insulation level, if it's cold, the neoair needs to be fully inflated. And it's always important to have a sleeping bag rated correctly.

I've never gotten in to R values, generally, in the colorado rockies (san isabel range) the general backpacking rule was over 2 inch thick for a pad below freezing and yer good. The neoair, fully inflated, with a -20 down bag, inside my Nemo Moki tent, has kept me toasty in -5F.

Hope this helps.

(3)

 

Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on August 15, 2010

5 5

The Sea to Summit titanium utensils are just great, I mean REALLY really great. They are super light, extremely durable, easy to pack. I can't think of anything I would ever have to complain about. I am hooked for life on these. One small way to turn a camp meal into luxury. Spork tips stab well enough to eat hobo meals (steamed veggies from the fire).

I thought nothing could get better that the normal sea to summit ti spork, and then BAM, a FOLDING ONE, even lighter, even smaller, still feeds my face.

(1)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on August 15, 2010

5 5

The Sea to Summit titanium utensils are just great, I mean REALLY really great. They are super light, extremely durable, easy to pack. I can't think of anything I would ever have to complain about. I am hooked for life on these. One small way to turn a camp meal into luxury.

This long spoon is an excellent stirring utensil, also great for rotating aluminum filled with veggies on the fire.

(3)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on August 15, 2010

5 5

The Sea to Summit titanium utensils are just great, I mean REALLY really great. They are super light, extremely durable, easy to pack. I can't think of anything I would ever have to complain about. I am hooked for life on these. One small way to turn a camp meal into luxury. Spork tips stab well enough to eat hobo meals (steamed veggies from the fire).

Just keep in mind the titanium long spoon is better that this spork if you want a good stirring utensil.

(3)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on August 15, 2010

4 5

All reviews are pretty much dead on when saying that these shoes are great for slab. Except that they don't tell you the truth. These shoes are THEBESTFREAKINSHOESONTHEPLANETFORSLAB!!!! The 5.10 Rubber is amazing, and these shoes genuinely have made me feel like I could walk on a wall. You'll be able to confidently stand on stuff so small you can barely see it's there. And when time comes for cracks with serious edging or crazy smears, the shoes will be there for you.

Small pockets aren't so good with this shoe, I would say 2 fingers or less is a hassle simply because the toe box is so square. This has a huge advantage on 3in or wider crack though as the shoe shape allows some serious grip on the inside and outside rubber. Some cracks I don't even have to edge against anymore, I can just kick my foot in and walk up it.

If you like slab, cracks on slab, or overhang. Buy these.

Another note, the top rubber does tend to flake quickly, but it hasn't affected the performance of the shoe in any noticeable way. Where it flakes is more of an aesthetic part of the shoe instead of a functional area.

(0)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on August 15, 2010

5 5

I have used the Arrakis 40 and 65 extensively. Other Arcteryx packs used is a Bora, I was somewhat hesitant at first at changing to the unconventional pack design, but I am so glad I did.

For a full idea of pack size, the 40 is perfect for day trips, and single day snowboard or cross country ski trips, while the 65 is more of an expedition pack, that I have thus far crammed 1 week of supplies and sustinance into.

This pack does not have a side zipper like the larger models, this makes it a TRUE drybag, so for full submersion activites, ie, deep water soloing, kayaking/rafting..etc this is the backpack of choice. The side zip on larger models will not leak during downpours, (tested in the monsoons of southeast asia), it will slow drip in full submersion.

Material is tough, and I mean, REALLY tough. I take very good care of my gear but have never had any inhibitions or worries when tossing this bag around. My Arrakis 65 has been tossed of small cliffs, dragged in the water, left in the snow overnight, for 2 years now, and still looks brand new. Also the material is very easy to clean.

Pack Design, originally my main worry, now I can't imagine having ever used a different pack, while most hiking packs have a stacked design with the pack space becoming narrow at the bottom, the arrakis is slightly wider at the bottom and allows the pack to be organized in such a manner that you can pull items from the bottom without unpacking the bag. This is very convenient.

The pack does not have compression straps, nor could it really, the material wouldn't compress much. The pack design inhibits the flopping around a normal pack would have if underpacked and not compressed. And the "3D" molding design of the pack makes the pack pretty much sit and look the same regardless of what's in it.

The rotating hip waistband is everything arcteryx claims it to be, wonderful. It moves with your body like a latin dancer. From a past of everything in packs from jansport to northface to marmot, it's the comfort that keeps me wearing arcteryx on long hikes.

Straps are sufficient, I only say this because I personally added some more and sometimes tend to strap too much to the outside of my pack. But for the normal person, the 40 accomodates a snowboard or ski's wonderfully along with a mountaineering axe or other small accessories. Or if you climb it's easy to strap a rope to the outside.

Hop on the Arcteryx site for the detailed size charts, everyone I know (including myself) that has followed the chart has been happy with the outcome.

Great pack, you'll love owning one, in any size.

(9)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote an answer about on June 23, 2009

It weighs 21.1 ounces. If you need a tool for cutting logs for a fire I would recommend the Gerber Gator Saw 2, I've used both (friend has the axe I have the saw) and the saw cuts much faster with less effort, and weighs only 7 ounces.

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on June 17, 2009

4 5

Bought this pack for stowing my climbing gear for bouldering on some islands. Required some swims between the rocks. I only bought the 30L as we at most would sleep the night on the sand and needed little. The bag never leaked, I've used it for this purpose probably 2 dozen times or more now, always being dragged behind me while I swim. Or used as a buoy for a break on a long swim.

My only thought is that the material appears like it may wear thin and eventually develop holes on the corners of the folds. Grant it there aren't any holes and this isn't a proven fact. The material there is just the only place that seems to be wearing faster.

EDIT--It's been over a year since I've had this bag, my worries of the material wearing at the folds haven't been justified. With 40-50 swims the bag still keeps everything bone dry and has taken some minor abuse of being dragged/dropped on rocks without any damage.

(5)

 

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Sean Macha

Sean Macha wrote a review of on June 17, 2009

5 5

I bought these shoes because I can been using my northface trail shoes hiking on the coast. The jagged rocks and coral was shredding my trail shoes quickly and the grip was very bad. Finally decided I would buy a pair of shoes more purposed for the task. Was I ever happy.

The grip on wet surfaces is excellent, everything from jagged coral, smooth stone, slippery seaweed and sharp barnacle covered rocks. I've even done a hike up a creek bed and was also pleased. Grant it your feet do get soaked so only for warm conditions. I wear these barefoot as I believe they are intended but when water gets a little too cold for the toes I match them with a pair of NRS neoprene socks.

Excellent shoe from TNF.

(1)

 

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