Sean Chism

Sean Chism

Tennessee, Southern Appalachian Mountains

Sean Chism's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Paddling
Climbing

Sean Chism's Bio

I love whitewater kayaking, backpacking, mountaineering, and just being outdoors in cool places. I prefer to spend the hot southern summers whitewater kayaking, and save backpacking for the winter months. Not to say I don't kayak in winter, or backpack in summer... I love doing both year round. I also have a passion for mountaineering, and enjoy the challenge of climbing higher and more difficult peaks that what you find in Tennessee.

Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on February 2, 2013

1 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

I bought this tent with high hopes, but the tent never even made out into the backcountry. I set it up at home, and was so disturbed with what I saw I returned it immediately. The ridge pole will bend and warp with just the slightest force. When I clipped the inner tent body to the pole it warped the ridge pole in such a way that it would bend down to the clips, and then rise up in between the adjoining clips. I understand that may be hard to understand, but imagine the ridge pole looked like a roller coaster bending up and down. When the fly was attached it would cause the ridge pole to collapse if tightened more than just snug. After about twenty minutes of adjusting the pitch I finally got the tent to look half way decent, but it would only take a slight adjustment to send the whole thing into disarray. I can't imagine this tent even being able to handle the slightest storm. Also, I'm 5'9", and when laying in the tent without a sleeping pad my head was against the mash door and my feet were about 1" from the rear wall. If I was on a sleeping pad I would imagine my feet would be in contact with the rear wall, and if there were two people in the tent both people's feet would cause the fly to bulge out. This tent was made well, but I feel the design has much to be modified. I found many poor reviews of this tent online, but purchased it anyways. In my opinion the reviews were spot on, and I should have listened to them. I have owned many tents from MSR, Mountain Hardwear, Sierra Designs, Exped, Black Diamond, and The North Face. These tents range from ultralight tents to mountaineering bomb shelters, and this tent was by far the most unstable, and poorly designed of the bunch. I know there are some reviews on this website that speak highly of this tent, I'm not sure what saw, but I'm shocked they even brought this tent to market.

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on August 8, 2011

5 5

I wasn't sure waht to think about this pack when I fisrt purchased it. It looks kind of old fasion, but after a week long mountaineering trip it performs better than most packs out there. It was super comfertable with a 50+ load. It has all of the options you will need in a mountaineering pack, a simple clean design, crampon patch, daisey chains, ice axe loops, gear loops, and a removable waist belt and lid. There is nothing extra to complicate things like extra pockets and unecessary zippers. That keeps it simple when your life depends on paying attention to what you are doing, and not trying to figure out what your pack is doing. I am 100% pleased with this packs performace, and wouldn't want to change it at all. Also on a sizing note, I normally wear a medium, but I tried a large to gain necessary volume. I found it to fit perfectly, I will say if my torso was any shorter than 18", or my waist any smaller than 32" it wouldn't have worked as well.

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on July 19, 2011

3 5

I recently purchased this pack, and I was able to compare it to the older version of the same pack that belongs to my wife. While this pack is adequate for the job, the suspension and construction doesn't seem to be as good as the olser version. The suspension is a single stay rod instead of the older versions dual stays. The reason I didn't like this was the fact that the load lifter straps have nothing to pull against, and do nothing tho releive shoulder stress. I also wasn't a big fan of the hip belt construction. After several training hikes with a 55lb pack the stableizer strap seemed to be pulling loose from the pack. While it didn't tear yet, it seemed to me that it was just a matter of time. I have returned the pack due to these issues. While I think the pack will do the job, I thought there were better packs for the same amount of money. If Mountain Hardwear had not changed the pack I would have kept it, and would have rated it at least a four star!

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on January 5, 2011

5 5

The MSR Fury is a resonably light weight, robust, and livable tent. The interior space is adequate, but a high ceiling with large floorpaln helps. The three pole geometry increases head room while creating a super strong shelter from mother natures fury. One intrance is not as good as two, but the trade off is a lighter weight (7.0lb stakes, poles, fly, body). The vestibule is quite large, easily holding two packs, boots, and a full sized dog. The ventilation is pretty good, especially when the tent's rear is placed into the wind. MSR uses the highest end materials on the market, and they don't cut corners. The attention to detail is easily noticed everywhere in the tent. Even in the gear loft where two slitted pockest hold head lamps for indoor illumination. When compared to other two person true mountaineering tents, this is one of the lightest, and when split up properly can be broken down evenly (3.5lb each). The price isn't too bad either, over all a great tent, and a good purchase.

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on January 5, 2011

1 5

Let me say first that I have other Steripen products. I like them, I use them, and I trust them. Now let me tell you what I think of this piece. Fisrt off my review is based off of personal experience, and my eye witness account of three other Steripen Journeys. All four units chew batteries up at the average rate of one pair per liter. At home the unit worked as it should, but the first time I took it into the field it wouldn't even treat one half liter with two new pairs of batteries. It was cool with lows in the thirties, I slept with the unit in my bag, and treated no different than my Adventure model that I have used in much colder temps without a problem for years. To top it all off when I got home I tried both pairs of batteries in the unit again, and the Steripen Journey again said the batteries were bad. Then I put both pairs into my Steripen Adventure, and both pairs worked flawlessly. I have used the Steripen Adventure without a single failure for several years now, and I would recomend it to anyone out there. the Steripen Journey on the other hand, well I wouldn't recomend it to my worst enemy.

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on January 5, 2011

5 5

I know that this pack got its start as a ski mountaineering/touring pack, but I find it great for backpacking also. Many of the ski specific features that set it apart from normal packs can easily be used for general backpacking gear. The probe pocket is a great place to store tent poles, or an ultralite camp stool. The huge kangaroo pocket on the front of the pack is great to stash wet gear like rain clothing, tent flys, tarps, and because it is totaly seperated from the main compartment it won't get the rest of your stuff wet. The side zipper access to the main pack is real nice to grab items on the go, and the roll top closure is fast to adjustable to handle any size load. The pack isn't submergable, but other than that it is totaly waterproof. My has withstood five hours of heavy continuous rain without leaking. The suspension is the most adjustable pack out there, not only adjusting for torso length, but shoulder width as well. This baby will handle even the most heaviest of loads, and shares the same suspension as some of Arc'teryx expedition packs. It will move with you almost as if it is part of you thanks to the swiviling hip belt. It a little heavy, it isn't the pack I use all the time, but when all hell is about to break loose I go for this baby. Its stated volume is very conservative, I think they only count the main compartment, but the kangaroo pocket is at least one third of the main compartments size. I mainly use this pack in winter or for longer trip due to its size. I tend to be a light weight backpacker, and I can fit four season gear and food for a week in this pack. Hands down this is the best pack I have ever owned, including some of the best offerings from Osprey, Gregory, and even other Arcteryx packs like the Naos and Altra.

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on November 2, 2010

5 5

I really like this pack, for one great reason, it is super comfortable. It carries the load close to your body so it moves with you, and the shoulder and hip straps are some of the best fitting I have seen. It has a clean design, good access with the panel zipper, lots of gear loops to haul climbing/ski/camping gear, and it is really light weight. I use mine mainly for ultralight overnight backpacks. The only thing I'm not a huge fan of is the back pannel isn't well ventilated, so your back will sweat some, but that is the trade off to have your load fit tight to your body. Typical Gregory quality, and craftsmanship. Overall a five star!

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on August 25, 2010

Preferd Flotation Devise
5 5

The is the PFD I prefer to wear. It is comfertable, very buoyant, and has great features. It has hand warmer pockets to keep the hands warm when scouting rapids in winter, two zip pockets to keep snacks and whatever, mutiple adjustors to dial the fit in, and it is even hydration compatible! It isn't that expesive either. I recomend it.

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on July 17, 2010

4 5

These pants are really great. You know what your getting with Gore-Tex Paclite, a breathable material that will hold up better than the cheaper ultralight breathable materials. That being said, the things I like about these pants are the waterproof zippers on the legs (no more storm flaps for the zippers to get cought in), and the elastic waist is comfertable to wear all day. The 3/4 length zippers I go back in forth on. I prefer them to full length if you want to vent your legs because full length zips tend to get loose around the waist when the zippers are down, but when it comes to putting them on over boots or crampons the full zip is the way to go. I guess nothing is perferct. Like all other OR Gear I have these pants are of the highest quality. Oh yeah, they have suspender loops also!

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on July 16, 2010

5 5

I'll keep it short and to the point. This OR Bottle Parka will keep your water from freezing, and that is all I ask for it to do. I have a #3 and a 1.5 liter Nalgene fits inside perfectly. The Zipper will freeze if you get it wet, and this will make it very difficult to open... Especially with gloves on, but with some effort it will open. Typical OR quality, you won't be dissapointed.

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Sean Chism

Sean Chism wrote a review of on July 16, 2010

5 5

This jacket is just what I have come to expect from Outdoor Research... A kick butt piece of technical clothing that has the right mix of functionality and clever features to make this a great hard shell for year round use. This jacket has all of the things you look for in a hard shell. The hood is helmet compatable with multiple adjustments, there are 3 exterior pockets, an inteernal pocket, adjustabel waist and cuffs, but the cool part is the pit zips. The pit zips can be unzipped all the way down to the waist to allow you to really vent your core. They also can be zipped up from the waist to the pit, this allows the jacket to be worn like a poncho, and that is killer for hot summer afternoons... Especially here in humid Tennessee. There are plenty of other Gore-Tex Paclite jackets out there with comparable specs, but I haven't found one yet that can match the ventilations options of the OR Foray. That reason combined with my personal love for OR Gear makes this Jacket a top continder in my book.

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