Scotty

Scotty

Wasatch, Cascades, Sierra... and anywhere in between

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Scott's Passions

Running
Biking
Paddling

Scott's Bio

Explorer of wilderness, color, space, sound, environment.

I have run myself into the ground from the pure joy of an unexpected sunny day in the Cascades, have woken up with a bear sitting on my head in the Sierra, and pedaled south from the Arctic Ocean in 17* temps.

Recovering shop owner, hopeless romantic, lover of consciously designed products and spaces.

Scotty

Scotty wrote a review of on June 20, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I can get pretty picky about tires- tires and wheels can completely change the way your bike rides, how confident you are in the corners, and how bad you suffer on the climbs. This tire harkens back to the Panaracer Cinder (which was a fantastic tire). Rounded profile for consistent release when you push it too far (so you have a chance of recovering). Fast rolling. Haven't had any issues with flats, and the tubeless setup went really smooth (with a floor pump and XTR wheels). Beautiful. I love these tires.

(1)

 

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Scotty

Scotty wrote a review of on August 21, 2012

5 5

Snow Peak puts a lot of thought and effort into designing it's products and this little lantern is a prime example of that attention to detail and usability. The light has 2 settings: solid and flicker. The solid is what you'd expect- with 3 brightness settings. You also get a mode however where holding down the button slowly dims the light, just like a dimmer in your house, so you can get just enough light. The flicker setting, enabled by double-clicking the on button can also be set to stepped brightness settings, and puts out a light that feels remarkably candle like. But the best part of the flicker is that it's affected by movement- giving a surprisingly real feel as the lantern swings from the roof of your tent or truck-awning. It is even realistic to the point that if it gets jostled too hard or a big gust of wind moves it it will blow the light out. The lantern can either be hung or set on it's hook so it looks like a candle. And the globe around the lantern is a silicone rubber so it folds down pretty small. In the hook is also a micro-USB plug so you can run this from a rechargeable battery. The 1 downside to this lantern for me is getting the battery cover back on when replacing the batteries... it takes a little bit of finessing and isn't something you want to have to do in the dark while wondering what is making the noise in the brush...

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Scotty

Scotty wrote a review of on June 22, 2012

2 5

I have one of these shirts that i've had for a heap of years and absolutely love- it's been my goto shirt for trail running, hiking, paddling, you name it. It's the perfect blend of synthetic and wool tech. Decided to pull the trigger and start breaking in a new one before the old one gave up the ghost and something strange has happened to the sleeves... they are possibly the longest sleeves in the history of short sleeves. The sleeves come down below my elbows- but not long enough to be called a 3/4. I'm still wearing it, but so bummed. The older shirt is perfect, the new one is goofy.

(1)

 

Scotty

Scotty wrote a review of on June 22, 2012

Killer hauler
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I spent a month (give or take) living out of this bag traveling around Croatia. The volume was perfect for swallowing a few changes of clothes, sandals, and the camera... but not so big that it felt unwieldy or excessive. The pack-straps make throwing it on and running across town from the ferry to catch a bus a breeze, and the exterior is durable enough that it still looks like new after a dozen bus trips in the cargo hold, about the same number of flights, and a handful of car trips between. I never had any trouble fitting it in the overhead compartments on any of the flights I was on... even when stuffed to it's capacity. On the rare flights I did check it- it was easy to spot coming down the conveyor too. I wish it had waterproof zips on it just to sweeten the protection it offers your stuff a bit. But even without, I wouldn't hesitate to buy this bag again.

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Scotty

Scotty wrote an answer about on March 23, 2011

Hey Migo- no drilling necessary. Those are post-mount brake mounts. Most brake calipers are post-mount and with the (slowly disappearing) standard-mount you needed an adapter.... with post-mount the caliper bolts straight to the fork leg which is cleaner, stronger and lighter.

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Scotty

Scotty wrote a review of on December 23, 2010

4 5

Both this set of controls and the Dura Ace that preceded them offer some significant design improvements that can only put a smile on your face.

First off is the new design of the internals. Shimano has moved the guts of the lever out of the body of the unit and into the lever. This allowed them to open up the entire bottom which makes keeping these clean much easier. In years past, when STI levers would fail it was not uncommon to be caused by grit and dirt buildup in the body of the lever. Now with the open design, that grit falls right out (and let's say you have a penchant for racing in the mud in the fall- you can use a dry spray lube like Boeshield T9 and hose these things out; keeping the insides clean and in excellent working condition has never been easier).

The second advantage to the new guts is that they have moved the brake cable routing and brought the Servo-Wave technology from their mountain bike brakes to the road. There is a knuckle that now pushes up on the cable in the lever through the lever stroke which [1] increases the leverage of the initial pull, and [2] allows for greater modulation at the end of the throw. Pair this with Shimano's incredibly stiff brake calipers and you suddenly have a significant increase in brake strength and control, with a smoother, lighter action.

One last feature i have to point out is the new lever reach adjustment. In the past, women (in particular- but anybody really) with smaller hands had 2 choices on the road- either suck it up and reach, or use a shim in the lever to bring it closer to the bar. The shim was less than elegant and not entirely easy to come by. With these new controls you have an adjustment bolt built in so everyone can tailor the lever throw and reach to their own preference.

The one change here that i'm luke warm on is the new cable routing which takes the housing back along the handlebar (as Campy has done for years). This is great for aesthetics, for cable longevity and for mounting bags, lights etc up front (for touring or rando for example). But there is one group who lost on this: cyclocross. While the controls themselves are easier maintained and cleaned which benefits CX, with the new cable routing you can't make quick shift or brake cable changes for example if your housing gets stuffed with mud from the pre-ride before a race. Also weekly cable changes during CX season (which isn't uncommon in the PNW), means you now likely have to change your bar tape weekly as well... which adds $20+ and another 10 minutes to the job.

All around there are some serious improvements to the already great Shimano road line. It's obvious Shimano isn't in the marketing game- they are in the engineering game. That means their products are consciously designed, well built, and reliable. It also means the 'cool new products' from other companies who put their dollars into marketing instead of engineering look great in an ad, but will not provide you with the years of hassle free service that Shimano will.

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Scotty

Scotty wrote a review of on December 23, 2010

4 5

Vittoria is one of very few tire manufacturers that exclusively builds bike tires; and the focus shows. They use the same technique to build these as their pro-level tubular tires (hence the 'Open' in the name) and this tire has one of the highest thread counts readily available (if not the) in a road clincher. Note- There are other tires on the market that publish a higher number- however if you dig into their literature you will find many of them are stacking multiple layers at a lower count and publishing that number (which is the equivalent of throwing a second 150 count sheet on your bed and saying you have 300 count sheets- it's bs).

This tire has a thinner and more durable casing thanks to the high TPI which translates to a very smooth ride and a tire that handles higher pressures (although the efficiency of tires running higher than 120psi on asphalt has been called into question). In my experience there is no increased chance of flatting due to the thinner casing (and in fact the only people i've dealt with that have had flat issues weren't properly inflating their tires before every ride and i suspect they were running these far below Vittoria's suggested minimum pressure of 120psi). I typically run mine in the 110-115 range through the grittiest and dirtiest times of winter with few problems from road debris.

As others have mentioned these tires excel in wet conditions as well as dry and the cornering is downright confidence inspiring.

If you want a durable, all conditions, performing tire it's hard to go wrong with an Open Corsa... Vittoria sits at the top of the class along with the likes of Vredestein, Dugast, and Challenge in their respective specialties.

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Scotty

Scotty wrote an answer about on September 15, 2010

This can quickly be changed (i've changed...

This can quickly be changed (i've changed mine when in Australia or Canada so it's consistent with maps, locals, etc).

Quick and dirty:
[1] From the time 'screen' hold down the Select and Mode Buttons (both top buttons)- 'set uni' should alternately flash.
[2] Hold the Select Button (top left) for a couple seconds- ft or m will flash.
[3] Use the bottom left and right buttons to toggle between ft and m.
[4] Press the Select Button again to set the measurement and cycle through the different functions available units of measurement, using the bottom buttons to choose metric or standard units for the different functions.
The menu looks like this: [alt: ft/m] <-> [alt: asc/dsc] <-> [baro: baro pressure] <-> [thermo: ]Xtemp]
[5] Press the Mode Button (upper right) to exit back to the time screen after your units of measurement are dialed.

dig it.

(mine is over 10 years old now, looks like hell but still working... a replacement is in my near future!)

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Scotty

Scotty wrote a review of on July 8, 2010

5 5

My Vector was purchased in 1999 after a night spent sleeping with feet in pack on the shoulder of the Wasatch Mountains in the late fall. We realized early the next morning, after bush whacking through the dense brush of a side canyon for hours through the night and ending at the top of a significant cliff band (and of course with 1 functioning headlamp between the 2 of us) that we really just needed an altimeter to corroborate our map reading skills. We had estimated we were about 500 feet lower in the valley and the altimeter would have made all the difference.

It is now 2010 and that Vector still sits on my wrist. It still looks reasonably all right considering it's 11 years old (the face for how large it is is amazingly scratch resistant), and still works like a champ. It has gotten me out of pinches across the western US, Australia, and western Canada and is always a nice backup to have if the day ends, the batteries on the headlamp die, and the GPS mysteriously decides it's done. Great for trail running, mountain biking, skiing and paddling (and supposedly my yellow model stops time too- though I haven't figured that function out yet). Possibly one of the best $200 I have spent.

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Scotty

Scotty wrote a review of on July 8, 2010

5 5

Shoes will always come down to a personal fit, and those of us who have 'foot particulars' know this all too well. I wanted to try Salomons for years but the shape was just not right for my skinny heels... but then alas(!) the shape of this shoe changed many many years ago finally allowing me to wear them and there has been no going back (this has been my go-to shoe for the past 8 or so years now). I have loose ankles and just cannot believe how supportive this shoe is on uneven terrain and rocky loose descents allowing me to only bring out the boots for particularly arduous cross-country treks or scrambling. The quick lace system they have works incredibly well (even with my fairly low-volume foot), and the Contra-Grip outsoles are solid on wet or dry terrain. This is a worthy upgrade from the XA Comps as well. The extra support they put into the heel cup makes all the difference in the world. If this shoe fits, you will not be disappointed.

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