Last Chance! Get It Before Labor Day Weekend—Order With Free 2-Day* by 5PM MT TODAY
Sam Reese

Sam Reese

Berkeley, Tahoe, East Side

    New Feature

    Browse Your Followers or See Who You're Following

  • #19383of 20023

Samuel R's Passions

Alpine Touring
Trad Climbing
Backpacking

Samuel R's Bio

Former ski instructor, ditched park and pipe steeze for backcountry (after an unfortunate incident in a superpipe leaving me with a titanium-reinforced collarbone). Recent convert to Trad climbing. Unrepentant gear-head after working a year at a independent outdoor shop.

photo from a tour in the Wasatch, march 08

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote a review of on January 12, 2010

4 5

>Sleek design won’t snag on the area boundary rope you somehow didn’t notice

I really find it annoying when things like this are put into advertising. Are you encouraging reckless behavior or criminal trespass? With more and more ski areas opening gates and allowing limited use of backcountry, we should encourage responsible use of these areas, not let people think that a cool backpack is going to keep them safe in unpatrolled areas.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote an answer about on November 29, 2009

Yeah, that's right. The downside is that you should pay a little more attention to applying them, because if they get snowed up on the glue, you're kinda hosed.

I skied a season with beat-up ugly purple Ascention (pre-BD) skins with no tails and bad glue that a friend found at a trailhead. They worked just fine except one time I put them on in a hurry, and they got snow under one and slid off.

(2)

 

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote an answer about on November 29, 2009

Ugh.

They are designed to just slide into them, but if there has been any dings to that thin metal sleeve, the new one will be a real pain to get in.

For best luck, razor off the old strap, go in with a flat-head screwdriver and make sure that the metal sleeve doesn't have any grabby spots or dents. if it does, try to open them up some (CAREFULLY!) or file them down, then put a little liquid silicon over the new strap, slide it through, pray, and pull it on the other side (CAREFULLY!) with some pliers.

Or you might get lucky and it'll just slide in. Who knows!

(2)

 

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote a review of on November 17, 2009

5 5

Quick review: These bindings rule. Once you get to trust them (which takes a while, they are SMALL), it's hard going back to anything else.

Long review:
Because you have metal-on-metal connection from boot-to-ski, these can drive more directly than anything you've ever had. Those old race bindings that went to 16? nothing on solid connection. That said, they can feel skiddish and chattery on hard stuff at first because there is almost no binding to absorb all that crap. Learn to trust them, and absorb more with your feet.

People talk about them coming out earlier than a traditional binding. I really think this is a function of not trusting them to release and dialing down or up because of that. Dynafits release very predictably in almost all situations. There are two pre-release conditions that I've come across: Flexing the ski hard (in moguls), and your boot pops out because the rear prongs aren't long enough. Also, coming out forward when bombing a hard packed run and hit chatter. They do absorb less viabration, so when things get hellatiously rough, you have to back off some, or take a beater of a fall. That said, bombing chattery hardpack isn't that much of a thrill...

Also, the leashes are chincy, and people ask you dumb questions at resorts.

I really nit-pick in this review because I was dubious. I'd been skiing nearly 10 years, 3 really serious years, and had BIG Bomber bindings. Crap that went to 14 or 16, and thought I needed that to stay on. I didn't trust dynafits, and thought they would be a lot of work. They work, and they aren't too much work, they are just a little different.

If you want click-and-go, these aren't them. If you want resort beaters, these aren't them. If you want a backcountry setup that will steal your heart and displace the rest of your quiver over time, well, step right up.

(3)

 

0 Comments

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote a review of on October 20, 2009

3 5

In line with the other comment, the bladder is trash. It's supposedly a North Face branded Nalgene bladder, but Nalgene bladders don't leak like this. I've had two thresher bladders leak (one at pivot at bottom, one at screwtop) and my girlfriend's TNF Mako bag leaked too.

Ok, now that we're off that, the Thresher pack is a great extremely small and rather light pack. It's got pretty good and supportive straps and backpadding, but it holds about 1.5 liters of water, wallet, keys, a sandwich and a cliff bar. You can perhaps shove a thermal in the bungee pouch, but it is small. Great if you are going for a bike ride or jog, bad if you want this to be a minimalist summit push bag (my original intention).

Overall, it's surprisingly good and breathable for an on-the-back pack, and quite light and streamlined... but as has been said, the bladder it comes with is landfill food.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote an answer about on October 6, 2009

So these come already cut for specific widths and lengths... And because they are by BD, they mate best with BD skis.

I highly suggest just getting a pair of regular skins and cutting them yourself, it is a little intimidating at first, but there are very good tutorials online.

RandoSteve does one here: http://www.tetonat.com/2009/01/cutting-climbing-skin-video-tutorial/

(1)

 

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote an answer about on October 6, 2009

These require "Tech" or dynafit compatible boots, which are the ones with little metal dimples on either side of the toe, and a little metal fork in the heel.

For instance, see the Dyafit zZeus or Titan boots.

(0)

 

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote a review of on October 2, 2009

4 5

Please read your manual. I used to work in a gear shop, and every last one of these we sold was to someone who didn't need it, or needed it because they mistreated their old filter.

Step 1: Don't need a new filter: I've had a MiniWorks for 11 years, if you let it dry out after trips (prevent mold), don't let it freeze with water in it, and make an attempt to get clear water into it, it'll last a decade or more.

Once you think you need to get a new one of these, check the MSR manual (online too!), and scrub off the surface according to their directions. Presto, I probably just saved you $40. Scrub it off, and when you do that, just bite the bullet and get new O-rings for it (normally less than $5 at your local MSR rep).

Also, make sure that you've got the prefilter on the little floatie. That'll again extend the life considerably.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote a review of on September 30, 2009

5 5

Let's get the negative out of the way. They are wider and less acceptable to side loading than CCH's Aliens. (Hence why I've got 3 aliens on my rack too). That said, I use these about 5 times more often than the aliens.

Why? Well, I climb mostly in the Sierra, and our cracks aren't that squirly. Almost always, I can throw in a TCU, and I rarely ever miss the sizeing, they jut seem to work. The color coding is intuitive and bright, the triggers work great.

I love everything about these, and don't think a rack is complete without 00-3.

Do note, as well, that 00 has somewhat a low strength rating, like all small trad pro.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote an answer about on September 29, 2009

It is an improvement over the old frame system, which had a mildly nasty habit of wearing holes through the face fabric or messing up the back-padding over time. It's kinda a silly thing to advertise it as bivy foam, as it is pathetically thin. I guess in an emergency, sure, I'd use it.

If you do take it out, I'd put vinyl tape around the aluminum stays, else you'll end up with a bag with some rub-holes in the bottom, like my old Jackal 45.

(0)

 

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote an answer about on September 29, 2009

Warm weather extremes? A friend of mine has a old Moss 3person version of this tent that she uses on the Black Rock dry lakebed in Nevada. We've seen temps above 105, and the inside of it gets steamy and stuffy, but livable. Doesn't really have much for ventilation.

She sticks with it, because it will shrug off a 55mph dust storm that flattened most the rest of the tents.

(1)

 

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote an answer about on September 29, 2009

The Naos is bigger, by a small margin, but it has way more organizational options, with the lid, and all. The Arrakis has a small zip pocket on the top outside, and that's about it.

Unless you live underwater, or plan on going canyoneering, these packs are pretty solidly overkill. The face fabric is so heavy. If you want the bird, check out the Bora series, or Khamsins. Osprey and Granite Gear also make comparably sized packs that carry well, with much less BC bling.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote a review of on September 16, 2009

5 5

This is my second glowing review of this jacket in so many years. It's like having a little house you can go inside when the weather is bad, and look out through your little protected window. It's so good that at times in hellacious weather, you can get this confused sensation about things not feeling real, until a gust of wind puts you on your butt.

For starters, let's talk about the bad: The inside fabric can feel really clammy right against your skin, if you plan on wearing a jacket bareback, go for a packlite or conduit DT laminate. Also, there aren't what one would expect for hand pockets, because that's where your pack's waist belt goes. The fabric is also very stiff when new, and doesn't break in much, so get used to a crinkly sound with the hood up, and a tin-roof over your head when it hails.

The pros? Everything. This thing is body armor against weather. The hood and elbow articulation are probably the biggest stand-out features of this jacket. The hood fits like a baseball cap, and doesn't drip water down your neck when you pull it back.

(6)

 

Sam Reese

Sam Reese wrote an answer about on September 14, 2009

Twin tips and fattie skis aren't just for the park and pipe anymore. (see history of LINE skis and taking the fun back from snowboarders in '92-present).

Twin tip skis can give you a really fun skiing experience, even if you never go a--first. The geometry of a twin tip and most modern powder skis gives you a lot of not just maneuverability, but recoverability, meaning you can extend further forward or aft of the sweet spot and recover quicker, a trait that is very useful in powder and moguls. These skis also often have a damper tail section, making them quicker to scrub speed, and less squirrely to ride from the back seat (or in the deep). Consider those attributes bizarre by-products of making skis easier to land jumps poorly.

As to Coomba v. Mantra v. Katana? Those are all very different skis: demo. Buy by feel, not by numbers.

(1)

 

load more