Robert Stai

Robert Stai

Robert's Passions

Hiking & Camping
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Climbing
Robert Stai

Robert Stai wrote an answer about on March 25, 2012

Actually most analog compasses don't function worldwide. There are 5 different "Compass Zones" along the longitude lines of the Earth. Due to the "dip" of the needle in relation to equatorial proximity, a North America compass will not function in South America or vice-versa. The exception is "Global" Compasses such as the two offered by Suunto which rely on a special axis rather than a weighted needle, hence the higher cost justification for a "Global Compass".

So the question remains: Due to the digital nature of a watch based compass, ie. no weighted needle or balanced axis, will they work in any zone?

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Robert Stai

Robert Stai wrote a question about on March 24, 2012

Would I be correct in assuming that with digital (ie. watch based) compasses, they will work globally? I would guess that w/o a physical needle, there's nothing to get hung up if you travel to a different compass zone?

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Robert Stai

Robert Stai wrote a review of on May 11, 2010

Beats the pants off GSI
5 5

I've used GSI, Brunton, and my iron skillet, and all-around nothing compares. I purchased this after my GSI set charred itself to death on my last trip.

The Pros:
-Heats quickly, evenly, and efficiently
-The larger pot is not non-stick coated: therefore nothing to worry about scratching off
-The large pot is wide enough to reach in and flip trailcakes etc.
-Cleans like a dream, even after burning a few things (my fault, not the pot), a simple scrub restored it to like-new
-The mugs actually fit your hand (not like the bowl shaped things GSI tries to pass off as mugs in their comparable dualist set)
-The plate/bowl holds a lot of food

The Cons:
-Doesn't come with a stuff sack
-The raised center on the bottom of both pots not only makes it difficult to stir food evenly but also prevents you from using it on super-compact stoves, including my trusty pocket rocket, much to my chagrin. I ended up having to buy a new stove just because of that. Talked to customer service at Cascade Designs (MSR's parent) and they said that they're currently redesigning the pots to fix this. I look forward to that!

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Robert Stai

Robert Stai wrote a review of on May 10, 2010

Good midweight stove
4 5

Not the lightest stove in the world, but quite packable and one of the few that'll easily support large (2-3 quart) pots (Pictured with my 2.5 quart MSR Quick 2 pot). Just used it for a week trek through the Boundary Waters in 30-40 degree weather; for a canister stove it performed very well in the cold, only frosted up once at a balmy temp of 30 degrees (and I had also forgotten to store the fuel in our sleeping bag that night). Fuel-wise we used about 12 ounces of fuel for one week, at two, two-person hot meals and one pot of coffee a day. That's real meals too, not freeze dried, and at an average daily temp of 38. Simmers very well. Would give it 5 stars except for the fact that it doesn't include the wind screen or hard case Brunton promises, does include a stuff sack though!

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Robert Stai

Robert Stai wrote a question about on April 15, 2010

Is this only compatible with the reactor stove? I'm looking for a high-cap pot that will work with my Pocket Rocket, and I'm curious as to whether the heat dispersion system on the reactor pot would help negate the typical "hot-spotting" of the Rocket on larger(wider based) pots.

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