Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca

Park City, UT

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Rob's Passions

Alpine Touring
Mountain Biking

Rob's Bio

STATS:
Height: 5'10"
Weight: 165#
Waist: 32"
Inseam: 31"
Chest: 40"
Sleeve: 34"
Neck: 15.5"
Shoe: US 10, Mondo 26.5
Head: 59cm, 7 3/8
Hand: 8 3/4"

TOYS:
Rossignol S7 188cm w/ Marker Jester
Scott P4 181cm w/ Fritschi Freeride+
Scott Punisher 182cm w/ Salomon S914
Ninthward Rory SFS 183cm w/ Rossignol 150
Dynastar 4x4 Big 188cm w/ Look P12
'98 Independent Fabrications Steel Deluxe Singlespeed
'04 Specialized Demo 9

COMING SOON:
LINE Eric Pollard Pro Models
LINE Prophet 130 186cm

THINGS I ENDORSE WHOLEHEARTEDLY:
Helly Hansen LIFA 3/4 pants
Bridgedale Precision Fit socks
Kinco Model 901 gloves
Mountain Khakis
Osprey Packs
Sidi shoes
Chaco Flips
Black Diamond tents
flannel shirts
Patagonia Capilene
insulated hoodies
Nalgene bottles
THE helmets
Bern helmets
Zipfit ski boot liners
Pieps DSP transceivers
Toyota
eVENT
Cordura
Levis organic cotton
coffee
Spacecraft
Billy's burgers
Lone Star Tacqueria
Cotton Bottom Inn
Emergen-C
Teton Pass
Alta
Snowbird
Solitude
Sugar Bowl
scotch
Duct Tape
hot tubs
Lefthand Sawtooth Amber
Pabst Blue Ribbon
Box wine
Gorilla Glue
Leatherman multi-tools
SOG knives
AMb beanies
Eneloop batteries
Discrete Headwear
Sanuk shoes
Tito's Vodka
Stoic
Oakley Crowbars
Scott Series 4 aluminum poles

Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote a review of on December 1, 2010

5 5

I am a fan of low-profile brimmed helmets, so my favorite helmets till now were the Bern Watts and Bern Baker. Just got the Riot and I am stoked on it.

PROS:
Really really light. Haven't weighed it but I would rank it among the lightest on the market.
Lowest profile of any helmet I've tried other than the Bern models, and the fit is better.
Liner is soft, stays put, and the ear pads are cush.
Fits as well out of the box as the Smith Maze (best-fitting helmet out there IMO, but everyone and their girlfriend has it). No forehead pressure point.
Strap setup is dead on and easy to adjust.
Chin strap pad is secure and really soft. I usually take them off but not this one.
Top vents are mesh covered (no snow plugs to knock out after you eat it).
Fits great with Oakley Crowbars and the re-issue Pro Frame.

CONS:
In-mold design, so not quite as durable as an EPS-lined hard shell.
The 'windshield' channel up under the brim doesn't fit my goggles, but I assume that's because of the goggles not the helmet.
Rear goggle strap holder should be removable, and it's just a tad high for my taste.

OVERALL:
Super nice. The pros far outweigh any cons, and I am really nitpicking. I fully recommend the Riot if you want a light, great-fitting, low-profile lid with a real brim.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote an answer about on November 22, 2010

Yes, it comes with a stuff sack for packing. Temperature rating, on the other hand, is very relative. I have worn mine down below 0 degrees F here in dry-as-a-bone Utah and been fine walking around. Under a waterproof shell, you could conceivably be comfortable in even lower temps. But comfort depends on your own metabolism, wind, humidity, activity level, etc. so please take that into account.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote a review of on November 14, 2010

2 5

I normally wear regular Helly Hansen LIFA 3/4 pants but I wanted something thicker to wear under shell pants for cold days. In a Medium, these fit pretty loose (I am 5ft 9in, 170lbs and usually wear a Medium) and the legs are too short to create a good fit with ski socks. The fabric is as light as my LIFA pants, and despite being 'double layer' doesn't feel warm enough. I can't recommend these as heavyweight long underwear.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote a review of on November 10, 2010

Wasatch struttin', one bad mother.
5 5

The Night Train, in my opinion, is THE SKI for powder, chop, crud, corn, pretty much anything that you can make a dent in. Fatter than Crisco but never sluggish because it's always on top; super quick when things get sketchy. Light enough that you can lap cold trees, point it to the tram, and hike for more all day long. Super stable in crud, and on groomers the sidecut means you won't feel like a clown. But most important: when it dumps for three days and you get your first untracked line on these things you'll think you died and went to heaven. Lawdamercy.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote an answer about on October 11, 2010

Tyler is incorrect. The Heli Pro DOES HAVE a dedicated snow tool pocket with room for your shovel and sleeves for your shovel handle and probe. It is the lower exterior pocket in the picture. While I would not recommend this pack for extended touring, it is a great choice for gate-accessed backcountry laps, in-bounds hiking, cat skiing, or any day on the resort that presents a high avalanche risk.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote an answer about on October 11, 2010

Sorry, but contrary to Tyler's answer this bag DEFINITELY DOES have ski and snowboard carry built in. Ski carry is diagonal, with a retractable wire loop at the lower right corner of the pack and a clip strap at the top left. While it's not the best carry system out there, it works fine for short hikes and fits fat skis without any issues. For touring I would recommend a bigger pack with internal support and 'A-frame' carry capability. As for your size question, I would recommend the 16L.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote a review of on September 8, 2010

The Terminator
5 5

The Thule T2 is without a doubt the BEST rack out there for mountain biking. It can't be bargained with. It can't be reasoned with. It doesn't feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever. Securing it is a piece of cake, loading up two bikes takes under a minute, and best of all you never have to bench-press a bike up over your head, or worry that you won't clear that 9-foot-tall parking garage. Need to check on the bikes? Look out your rear window; there they are. I run HUGE 2.6 diameter tires on my DH bike, and they fit no problem. If you want to buy the locks, go for it, but you don't need them if you have a long locking cable and loops on your hitch mount. Get this rack!

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote a review of on August 9, 2010

4 5

So far, so good. I've had the 876's for a few weeks with Sole footbeds added in for arch support. I can't really speak to them without the inserts, but they felt like they'd still be ok if you didn't have a high arch like I do.

PROS: They're light and fit true to size for running shoes (I go 1/2 size up from all my street shoes). The Debris-Free construction is awesome; instead of a tongue there's just a stretchy gusset across the instep to keep out dirt and pebbles. I haven't had any fit or friction issues with it. The Rock Stop plate also works as advertised, and the tread, while minimal, is great in anything but straight mud. The reverse tread in the heel works well on downhill sections. There's more cushion in the toe than in most trail runners I've tried, which is nice. The locking laces take a bit of getting used to, but once you know you don't have to over-tighten them, they are great.

CONS: The Lightning Dry lining is slippery at first, takes a few runs to break in but you'll have some heel slip at first. Moving from the North Face Fire Road, the 876's are slightly less stable in the heel, possibly because they have more cushioning; it's not a big deal for me but it might upset a heel-striker. They're also a bit hot due to fewer vents in the toe area.

Overall I am very pleased. I have a narrow heel and wider forefoot so it's hard to find the right fit. These remind me of my old Asics Trail Attack 3's but they are lighter, cushier and cooler in hot weather. They also look pretty sweet. I suggest you buy some.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote a review of on July 26, 2010

5 5

It's low-profile, comfortable, and warm without being hot. Ok, the Brock foam isn't rated for severe impacts, but I have rung my bell pretty hard in this helmet and I'm still here. I can definitely say I'd have been in bad shape without it. Also that means you can toss it around without worrying you'll decrease the protection. The EPS version simply doesn't fit as well.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote an answer about on July 26, 2010

Chris, here's the easy answer: take out the liner. With the Brock version just get a thin helmet liner to cover your ears, and Crowbars will fit right up under the brim as a result. Note: this is with the strap going OUTSIDE the helmet. In the EPS version, take the liner out and wear a beanie underneath with the goggle strap inside the helmet. Trust me.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote a review of on June 30, 2010

5 5

Trust this: you can't tell how nice the Plattans are until you have them in your hands. They have a high-quality, sturdy feel from top to bottom, like that 'thunk' when you close the door of a German luxury sedan, but made into a headphone. The drivers, headband and cord are all matte finished, and the logos are ultra-discreet. Even the wire clips that hold the cans are finished to match the color scheme (I have the black ones and the wires are gunmetal chrome, which you can't really tell from the photo). Great-looking headphones, period.
Sound is pretty tight. Not mind-blowing audiophile quality, but I haven't heard anything better at this price, or that looks this good or packs down this small. Good efficiency; plenty loud with my laptop volume at 60% and iTunes around 50%. Decent bass, and the highs are rounded off, never shrill.
Fit is tight and secure, and the pleather earpads are plush and smooth. My only complaint would be that the cans don't swivel horizontally, but as it stands they're comfortable enough for all-day use.

Overall, these are awesome. If you want good sound, but you don't want to spend a mint and/or walk around looking like an escaped studio producer, you'll have a tough time beating the Plattan.

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Rob de Luca

Rob de Luca wrote an answer about on June 15, 2010

If you're skiing tight trees, the 182 might be a lot of ski for someone your size. Alex Vu says play it safe with a bigger ski; I say play it safe and get the ski that's right for you now, so you're not struggling, hating life, and waiting to grow into them. The 172 will be perfect for now, and remember: you can always sell skis when you're finished with them.

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