Richard Possin

Richard Possin

Japan, NZ, AK and occasionally Australia

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Richard's Passions

Snowboarding
Skiing

Richard's Bio

Me lovey powder

Richard Possin

Richard Possin posted an image about on September 14, 2014

How to store your crampons on this pack

I struggled to find the best way to store my crampons in (or on) this pack when touring. There's an adjustable clip strap that comes up over the main compartment pack closure (but under the lid) that I previously thought was useless until I took my ice axe and crampons. This is what I came up with.

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Richard Possin

Richard Possin wrote a review of on July 29, 2014

Dig, Study.... LIVE
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

This is my first snow saw and I'm very happy with it. If you're serious about digging pits, you're going to need one at some stage. This one is relatively light and compact and seems tough and strong. It's got a ruler for measuring column widths and mini-grids for snow crystal sizes. Handy too, for the odd bit of wood surgery.

The handle can probably be ski-strapped to a ski pole for some long range cornice cutting, although I haven't tried this.

The bonus bottle opener is a nice touch for those post-touring trailhead beverages!

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Richard Possin

Richard Possin wrote an answer about on July 20, 2014

Reid, not quite long enough to carry a snowboard vertically, at least with a decent amount of gear in the pack. I use this pack split boarding so whenever I have to boot it, I split the board and a-frame. I had a nasty experience doing this the other day when someone mis-took me for a skier!!! Seriously though, If you're talking about a solid board, there's 3 choices:
1 - horizontal under the pack closure straps (which probably aren't designed for this load and could fatigue rather quickly); or
2 - horizontal between your back under the shoulder straps and the pack; or
3 - Macgyver a vertical solution with 2 ski straps (you'd probably want 24 inch straps).

I'll take some photos and post an update for you soon.

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Richard Possin

Richard Possin wrote a review of on July 7, 2014

Hot Tea on a Mountain!
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I really like this mini-thermos, it's great for ski touring when you don't want to bulk out your pack with a big regular size thermos flask. It won't keep your Tea quite as warm for as long as a normal glass-lined thermos will, but is certainly good enough for day tripping. Worth checking you've tightened the lid properly before you put it back in your pack as I've nearly put it with the lid slightly open (faulty operator not equipment!).

I haven't tried it in warm weather with cold liquids, it's got different lids depending on whether you want warm or cold.

For weight weenies, there's a titanium version ($$$) that shaves some weight off.

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Richard Possin

Richard Possin wrote a review of on May 17, 2014

Perfect for layering when Alpine Touring
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

This is my "go to" layering piece for when I'm touring, mostly I use it as a mid-layer in warmer touring climates like Australia and NZ. Having a synthetic fill rather than down works much better in these warmer environments as it's not a problem if it gets a little wet.

I find the best use is when I'm skinning and you hit an exposed ridge line and it gets a little colder or you're suddenly in the shade for a while. I generally have it under some compression straps on the outside of my pack and it's easy to quickly take the pack off, chuck it on and move on quickly without opening and searching your pack for a shell.

It's super light and compresses into it's own inside pocket about the size of a really fat beer can.

Would you believe this photo is in Australia?

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Richard Possin

Richard Possin wrote a review of on April 20, 2014

Lifesaver, but pack itself ordinary
3 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I've used this 'lightweight' 5L pack at a heli operation in Alaska and also a 50L ABS pack when touring.

I'm quite conflicted about the ABS airbags because they're such a fantastic backcountry safety device, but really let down by poor pack design and straps.

The airbag part of the pack is great, no doubt it's a potential lifesaver in avalanche terrain and that's fantastic. Having two airbags is a nice redundancy. The logistics of airline travel with the gas cylinders are a nightmare though.

My first beef is with the removable activation handle. IT'S WHITE FFS *&%#$!!!! Yes, that's right - it's the same colour as the snow. WTF? Did they run out of coloured plastic? Not such a problem if you're touring, but if you're heli skiing (you have to remove it from the pack to prevent accidental activation in the heli) and you drop it in powder as you're removing it, it's REALLY hard to see.

The straps, particularly the waist strap, on both packs I've used are substandard and loosen by themselves and I had to continually tighten them. I'd hate to see what happens in an avalanche.

The good news is you can buy the ABS base unit and get a zip-on pack from another manufacturer, which is what I'd recommend.

Some people complain about the extra weight. I can't say it's a problem for me - you can't have an omelette without breaking eggs.

Personally, I'm going to wait to see what the newer options e.g. black diamond jet force are like before I commit to buying an airbag pack.

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Richard Possin

Richard Possin wrote a review of on March 28, 2014

Good binding if you have EST
3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I'm happy with this binding, but there's a few things that could be improved. It's strong and stiff, which is the way I like my bindings. The straps are good quality and look like they will last a while. The footbeds are easy to remove although I leave them in.

I don't have a problem with needing a tool to make adjustments as I always carry one anyway. The only annoying thing with adjusting is that the bit you need for the ICS screws needs to be quite long as the 'rails' the screws sit in are quite high, that's definitely a design flaw.

I used to have cartels and I was expecting these to be lighter than those, but they're not.

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