Pliny

Pliny

Olympic Mountains, Cascade Mountains

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Pliny's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Climbing

Pliny's Bio

I like variety. Last week I hiked around Mt. Rainier on the Wonderland Trail (Well, 60 miles of it anyway) and next week I'm headed for City of Rocks, Idaho for some rock climbing. I've been out 53 days so far this year.

Pliny

Pliny wrote an answer about on January 12, 2013

Mine has the European standard range of temps on it. 41/32/3.2 F. But temp ratings are relative because of individual differences and differences in conditions (wind, humidity, tent size, clothing worn, and may physiological as well as psychological factors. It is all very confusing, but remember this. If a bag has same weight of down fill of the same quality (loft) then any average designed mummy will give you the same warmth. 2 lbs 2 oz of 600 down is adequate in my opinion for three seasons. I have no condensation problems and mine sheds water better than I would expect (and I don't plan on it). I think you are steering in the right direction looking at this down bag and ones of comparable weight.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on March 1, 2012

2 5

If you are experienced and know what you want go for it. But if you are not please consider this advice. External frame packs have not been popular for some time. 4.8 pounds is a heavy pack. This pack has some very nice features and would probably last your lifetime, but my guess is that as you gain experience you will understand how critical weight is and will shed this one for one that weighs closer to 3 lbs. rather than close to 5. My JanSport is not identical to this, but the weight is and I will probably never use it again because I now own much lighter packs that are more than adequate for the job.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on November 7, 2008

5 5

1. they are light weight when you are carrying them to higher elevations.
2. They climb well when you get up high above the tree line.
3. They are simple in design and work well in all conditions, but I especially find then useful in winter alpine climbing. The buckling system is excellent.
4. Sometimes, rarely, they don't provide adequate flotation, but I don't have the extenders for the tails,(I'm unwilling to carry the weight and besides everyone I climb with is in the same boat) and I suppose that would solve that problem. I am 180 lbs (200 dressed with pack) And they work for me.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on September 8, 2008

5 5

I have used this device for about a year. It is better than a figure-eight device because it doesn't twist the rope. The high friction mode slows the rappel to make it safer, and when used to belay I fell it stops the fall faster. The price seems okay and it is light and easy to use. Durable. I found the workmanship somewhat wanting: Not polished. But the function is superior.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on August 28, 2008

5 5

I was given this head lamp as a gift a few years ago. It is very light weight and provides adequate illumination for walking on a trail at night. It works well on the head or even better on your wrist. Batteries seem to last for ever. It does not turn on accidentally in the backpack. I have nothing bad to day about this little treasure. I take it on day hikes, overnights and week long trips. I have found it durable and it has worked flawlessly hundreds of times. I have replaced the batteries a couple of times long before they wore out. I have never had to use my spare batteries I carry around.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on August 28, 2008

4 5

I have both the 48 inch and the 72 inch Ridge Rest by Therm-a-rest. I use the 72 inch for winter camping. It provides just enough insulation for camping on snow, no extra. The 48 inch I use for summer backpacking and it is, in my opinion, the most comfortable thing you can carry at 9 ounces. It provides minimal comfort, but I am used to it and wouldn't carry anything heavier. It will not puncture or deflate in the middle of the night. It is not expensive. It is bulky, but I just tie it on to the back of my pack and that has never been a problem. Comfort is the only drawback. If you can afford the weight and cost of an expensive self-inflating Therm-a-Rest pad go for it. Otherwise this is a very good choice. Head and shoulders above a flat blue foam pad.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on August 28, 2008

5 5

I didn't know much about ropes when I purchased this rope as a second rope. It turned out to be a very good rope in many respects. It has a good feel and seems to take use without getting abraded. When I looked up the specifications I found out it is very dynamic and strong. It comes with a three year guarantee. I ordered the 50 meter version of this model and it turned out not to be bi-color. I have used it for Trad climbing.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote an answer about on August 25, 2008

I used a rope that I believe was 11 mm and on a double rope rap it was slow to feed, but worked. A 100 pound gal with us had to feed it through to get down. I just measured the actual slots and there are two slots about 14.5 mm across the narrow axis and 30 mm on the long axis. So it a 12 mm rope would fit, it just might be stiff to work it through.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on August 25, 2008

5 5

This is a solid stove that has cooked and melted snow tirelessly for me in sub zero temps in Alaska. The weight listed is correct. It is reliable and any problems can usually be fixed in the field. Some people think it doesn't simmer well: That is because they pump it up too much. Climbers have used these stoves for years in adverse conditions with success. If it is a gasoline or multi fuel stove you want, this is a time tested, fast cooking good one. Weight is the trade off, other stoves weigh less nowadays.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on April 8, 2008

4 5

I purchased this bag based mostly on price. It replaced a synthetic bag and I have been very happy with it. Pros: It has more wiggle room than my old bag. I have used it at at 32 degrees with a base layer on and it was adequate. It seems to have a water resistant cover, water beads up on it. The hood is effective. For a bag this light you might be surprised at the lack of loft. Fluff it up and store it that way. You might be able to find a warmer bag of the same weight, but you would probably pay near double what this one retails for. Zipper works well, I replaced the stuff sack because I thought it was too small.

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Pliny

Pliny wrote a review of on December 11, 2006

3 5

I got this pack to reduce weight carried on long arduous day hikes and climbs. It did reduce the weight and that is the best feature of this pack: light weight. It has adequate pockets that I like. The photos in the advertisments are not what your pack is going to look like unless you stuff it with down feathers. It is a bit sloppy looking actually and the top lid/pocket often hangs to one side because it is only attached at two points for easy removal. The volume is adequate for winter day climbs, but the volume is a little low for overnight winter or for one week in summer. The trade off with all light packs of this brand is that the material is fragile. It tears easily and mine tore from stress above the sholder straps in a place that was hard to sew. I know people who have rubbed them against rock while climbing down steep routes and torn them. Good from a weight standpoint and it does what I want, but bad from a durability standpoint.

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