Phil Maher

Phil Maher

Sonoma, Yosemite, Sierras, Cascades

Phil's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Climbing

Phil's Bio

My philosophy: All gear should be edible.

Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on February 5, 2014

Hey,

You can pull off a 5L or go up to the 8L and have plenty of room in either. Your Summerlight long stuffs at 6x12" (WM specs are XXS in the stuff sack they provide), so a little shy with the 5L in the width, but more than enough in the length. If you really need to compress your bag, that's how it is, but over time, it's tough on the down and shortens the lifespan, not to mention that it requires extra time to get the bag lofted back up before bed. My WM bags are probably the one thing I never ever compress unless I absolutely have to, and 6x12" is already a very doable packed volume to begin with. Hope this helps.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 8, 2014

Hey,

I'm not personally familiar with this system, but lithium ion batteries perform notoriously poorly in the cold. Keep your battery pack inside your coat or sleeping bag if you want to use it below freezing. Also, even though this is supposed to have a 5-8 year life span on the battery, every time you use it is going to give your just slightly less of a charge. Hope this helps you out a little.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 6, 2014

Hey Biran,

Define "cold"? Maybe freezing-ish for this piece...maybe, depending on whether you personally run hot or cold. Any colder and you'll be better off zipping in a heavier fleece liner and using the TKA liner it comes with as a base layer in a 3-part system or going to something heavier like the TNF Boundary Tri-climate. Hope this helps.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 6, 2014

Hey Kaley,

You're talking temps and latitudes that rate as Arctic and top-of-the-world type stuff. You're living it, so I don't think I can tell you much that you don't already know in that regard. You want much more than 550 fill and any kind of average jacket. Your best bet for where fashion meets function is going to be Canada Goose. If style isn't so much an issue, start looking at Mountain Hardwear, TNF, and maybe Marmot in 850 fill weight parkas designed for high altitude mountaineering...Oh jeez that's cold!!

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 6, 2014

Hey Reese,

I'm totally with David on this, but, even though it always sucks to have to pay more (extra) for the right footprint for a tent, besides the fast-pitch option, it's nice to have the all the right parts when you need or want them. If you wait, you also have a good chance of the right footprint becoming something you can't find anywhere, including TNF, because it'll be out of production (we get that a lot from people). I like Tyvek, but I like a complete tent set up even better. Hope this helps you out.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 4, 2014

Specifically,"light rain" is defined as about 0.10" per hour, so hopefully that gives you a better perspective on what to expect. But yeah, at 30D, it's roughly the same as an 8x10' square rain fly. With the denier rating of the rip-stop Cordura and the Hypalon reinforcements, it's not that it will tear and collapse in anything harder (assuming you're guyed out and draining off right), it's that the water will overwhelm the performance capabilities of the silicone impregnated into the nylon. If the specs for packed size/ weight are less than what you've got, and you know the limitations vs your ultimate needs, it should be as good or better than what you have now. Sil-nylon does pretty amazing stuff for what it is as a material, and Rab generally doesn't mess around with lame fabrics or construction. Hope this helps.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 4, 2014

Hey,

That's a wealth of information, but I'm showing the stuff size for the Sorcerer at 18x8.5", so let's use that to start. That would put you in a 16L Rock Solid. The rule is to get as close to the original stuff size for the bag as possible, then, especially with synthetic fills, consider more compression as a gift. Too small to begin with, and stuffing your bag becomes a constant drag.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 3, 2014

Hi,

I'm not clear on if you damaged the lace or if it came that way for some reason. If it came that way, send them back or try to get a new set of laces. If you somehow damaged the lace, and it's still long enough to tie properly, cut off about half the frayed end and take a flame (lighter) or very hot knife to the rest. That should seal it off and stop any more fraying.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 3, 2014

Hey,
Yep, they will. But, having the proper front and rear welts, your Trangos will also easily accept this Cyborg in the step-in Pro version.

http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en/climbing%2Fcrampons/cyborg-crampon-BD400033_cfg.html?dwvar_BD400033__cfg_color=Stainless#start=2

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on January 2, 2014

Hey,

In terms of thickness and performance, being the same weight fleece, it's going to be roughly the same. It's a little loose if you size it right, but it's not going to be anywhere near the overall bagginess of the Denali, which is especially huge in the arms. As stand-alone pieces, both are cold when the wind kicks up...like of no use at all. Nylon panels on the Denali add a little abrasion protection, but not so much in the insulation dept. Both pieces work best as a mid-layer under your shell...great insulation in that case, but the fit of the Synchilla under a shell makes it superior in my opinion. Hope this helps.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on December 30, 2013

Hey Elizabeth,

It's 63mm (and I just measured mine to double check). As a reference, it's the same diameter as, and will thread right on to, a large-mouth Nalgene bottle.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on December 29, 2013

Hey Ian,

I'll partially agree with Bill and MD; it's boxers, a t-shirt, and sometimes a light pair of socks for me as well. Generally works pretty good, and during summer, I do occasionally pull out a Cat's Meow of my own. Although, the sleeping naked for more warmth is a myth . The EN 13537 sleeping bag comfort ratings are based on the sleeper wearing a thin base layer (ie: long underwear) and a hat, regardless of what that fill material is. Also remember that without a layer, your sweat and oils will be absorbed directly by the lining, and eventually, the fill material. In the case of down, that's actually kind of destructive in the long run. Hope this helps.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on October 14, 2013

This type of Gore material will block the wind effectively, even though it's not specifically Gore Windstopper. Even with the wind blocked though, you should plan to have some heat loss just by transfer, so layer up for insulation against the cold.

For the price, you should look at the full specs directly from OR (and yes, being windproof is one of them)....and here they are:

http://www.outdoorresearch.com/en/womens/jackets/womens-vanguard-jacket.html

Hope this helps.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on October 14, 2013

Jackets don't really have temperature ratings because whether you're warm or cold is too specific to who's wearing them. But, without more layers, you'll start feeling the chill at about freezing, maybe a little higher. So, to be on the safe side, plan for 40 degrees , hope for lower, dress accordingly for your comfort level. Hope this helps.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on October 14, 2013

Hey,

You can possibly pull off a medium in a few brands, but large is generally the size you'll want in most. Rule of thumb is to take the original stuff size of your bag +/-(in this case, 9x20") and use that as the baseline for your compression sack sizing. You might get an inch or two more diameter, but you're not going to lose any ability to squish it down to the max lengthwise. You get too small to start, and stuffing the bag gets to be a real hassle, especially if you opt for something waterproof with a roll-top.

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Phil Maher

Phil Maher wrote an answer about on October 14, 2013

Hey Laurel,

You have to know the limitations. You trash them, it's not going to be covered under warranty.

Here's how Mont Bell sees it:

MontBell?s warranty covers all defects in materials and workmanship to the original owner for the lifetime of the product. If a product ever fails due to a manufacturing defect, MontBell will repair the product, or replace it, at our discretion. This warranty does not cover damage(s) caused by accident, improper care, negligence, alterations, or normal wear and tear. Damage(s) not covered under warranty will be repaired at a reasonable rate and a fee will be charged for shipping. All shipping to the MontBell Warranty Department must be pre-paid....

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