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Peter Kaminski

Peter Kaminski

North Carolina for now, I guess

Peter Kaminski's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Snowboarding
Paddling
Snowshoeing
Climbing

Peter Kaminski's Bio

I work for an outfitter. I used to work for TNF.

Peter Kaminski

Peter Kaminski wrote a review of on June 5, 2013

2 5

I brought this jacket home a few weeks ago and have been only disappointed by everything but the color. The first problem was with the sizing. I am about 6'1 and 185 lbs. I tend to fit a medium well from most brands through the torso, though often have to size up to a large for the additional length. Somehow, sizing up to a large made no difference with the sleeves. I've never had a large from any other brand too short in the sleeves, but even lifting my arms up as little as to a steering wheel draws the sleeves back to where they're 2-3 inches too short. I couldn't imagine trying to climb in it for that reason, or for the fact that this Evap really isn't what it's made out to be. Simply put, it is no substitute for a third layer and feels even grosser than Paclite's notoriously sticky half later. Precip from Marmot at least has a slightly raised half layer to keep it off of your skin, and costs less. The lack of pit zips obviously doesn't help with that, though at least it does contribute to the one positive I find with this jacket: it is very lightweight and packable. It's great for that throw-in-the-pack and you probably won't wear it 30% chance of rain day hike. The unlaminated hood brim similarly is great in that it's packable but uncomfortable and impractical for extended use. The water resistant zipper also is more packable than a polyurethane zipper, and true to the fact that this jacket really wouldn't be great for extended use.
All that aside, the colors are hot.

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Peter Kaminski

Peter Kaminski wrote a review of on June 12, 2011

5 5

I've now had these shorts for only 5 days, so I can't speak to the long-term durability, but have had a very positive experience with them. I had a good experience both bouldering and gym climbing in them. In the gym, I appreciated the freedom of movement and the ability to keep a few bucks in the harness-compatible zip thigh pockets. While bouldering on (extremely) abrasive and sharp poured concrete boulders at a park in Cary, NC I appreciated having my knees covered.
The negative part: even though they're a lighter weight cotton/nylon blend, they're warmer than most shorts because they're longer. This isn't something I can really hold against the design, because I bought them to protect my knees while climbing rather than to stay cool. That being said, the trade off of being a little sweaty versus having my knees chewed up while climbing is worth it.

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Peter Kaminski

Peter Kaminski wrote a review of on May 15, 2011

Love it
5 5

This is my first rope, but I've had experience with a friend's Nomad 9.8 and a Metolius 9.8 as well. It seems to perform very similarly to the Nomad, but has much, much more sheath. It is just as supple with almost as much stretch to it. On a lead climb I haven't been able to notice the weight difference between the Xion and Nomad, but there isn't any multi-pitch near me, so I haven't tried that yet. The weight difference might be more noticeable then.
This rope truly shines in TR situations for me. I naturally prefer not to have it rub on anything, but if it does... well that's why there's so much sheath!

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Peter Kaminski

Peter Kaminski wrote a review of on May 7, 2011

5 5

For the money, it's probably worth it to jump up to the Ropemaster. I only went with the Dirt Bag because it was the only one left in stock through Metolius. At the same time, the only real difference I've noticed is tarp size. I don't really need the compression systems or dual shoulder straps that are featured on the higher end rope bag since I tend to throw it in a backpack, anyway. My 10.1mmx60m rope compresses down almost as well just by pushing and then packing a little weight above it in my pack as it would in a compression rope bag. I hate storing anything compressed down all the way for extended periods, and appreciate that the Dirt Bag keeps my rope looser in my closet, since I only bring it out every other week or so.
As far as complaints about the tarp are concerned, I agree that it definitely is a little small. I mostly wanted a bag as a way to store my rope and protect it for transport, not for once I'm at the crag, anyway. At least I've finally found a use for my tent footprint...
Other reviewers have complained about the zipper, drawstring, and drawstring toggle. I like the big zippered opening to get the rope in easily, and don't even use the drawstring, but am only using a 60m rope. There's a snap at the top of the zipper seems very effective to me for keeping the zipper closed.
This is my first rope bag. For the next one, I'll get a Ropemaster. I definitely will still have a place for my DIrt Bag in my closet though, as I appreciate it for storage.
All told, I recommend this as a first rope bag for a 60m or shorter rope, although I haven't experienced how it performs with 70m ropes.
Also - Dirt Bag is an awesome name.

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Peter Kaminski

Peter Kaminski wrote a review of on March 19, 2011

5 5

Backcountry says this is a neutral shoe, but it isn't exactly. TNF included a section of higher density foam right under the arch to help provide stability for pronators. Although it's not as effective as the (outdated and heavy) stability platform that has dual density foams through the heel, in a TRAIL situation this is the ideal choice for a pronator. The only difference between this and the Gear of the Year Single-Track is the dual density foam and the removal of the 'Snake Plate' forefoot protection.

I loved my Single-Tracks, but like most people I pronate. I didn't really notice that I was hurting wearing a neutral shoe until I upgraded to Singe-Track THs'. My experience has been that the lack of the snake plate hasn't really made that big of a difference. The guidance, however, is enough for running on trails. I feel more energized and natural after a run these days. Do not count on it being enough guidance for running on sidewalks, roads, etc...

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Peter Kaminski

Peter Kaminski wrote a review of on February 23, 2010

4 5

very nice pack, but the gregory lumbar padding just doesn't work for me. after a few trips i had rubbed my back raw too many times and had to switch to a different pack. apparently that is the case with most Gregory packs. I particularly like the mesh paneling, but this pack is full of excellent features and yet still stripped down to the necessities. Unfortunately, the fit under that foam was enough to offset all of the positive features for me and make the pack miserable to use. I could imagine the foam being quite comfortable to someone, but be wary when purchasing online if you haven't tried it out yet.

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