Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer

The backcountry of Virginia's ridges, peaks and knobs. (That sounds dirty...)

Patrick's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Running
Climbing

Patrick's Bio

I was born in the summer of my 22nd year. That was August 1992. Already an avid fisherman and hiker/backpacker, I set my sights on Mt. Washington. Those three days in the Presidential Range Sparked a passion that is still with me today in my 40's.

The 20 years that passed saw a career change, wedding, and subsequent divorce years later. The weight of real life kept me from the mountains for ten years. In the past few years, I have re-discovered the passion and reclaimed the time to head up the hills again.

I've spent my time bagging peaks in my adopted home of Central VA. I'm training and plugging away in hopes of achieving my ten year goal. By 2014, Rainier, Whitney in winter, some CO 14'ers and WY's glaciated 13'ers. By 2017, Aconcagua, Denali and Cho Oyu. And finally, by 2020, Everest.

I'm a former smoker and asthmatic, and I want to show kids and adults alike that asthma isn't any kind of death sentence, or even a limiting factor when you properly control it and keep yourself healthy.

Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer wrote an answer about on July 5, 2013

They will take fully automatic crampons. I've used Grivel G22 cramp-o-matic with them, but the boots arem't stiff enough for serious vertical ice.

Combine these boots with Grivel Air-Tech crampons and you have a decent combo for general mountaineering. However, these boots are only suited for warmer conditions and won't be heavy enough for bigger peaks like Rainier.

They are great heavy backpacking boots and decent for light-duty mountaineering. They'll handle everything here on the East Coast with the exception of the Presidentials in winter.

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Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer wrote an answer about on May 15, 2013

No, this is an uninsulated shell jacket. It is designed as a waterproof and windproof outer layer, to be worn over an insulated layer, such as a fleece. Of course, for warmer conditions, it is fine alone.
You will likely find what you are looking for in the insulated jackets category or 3-in-1/triclimate category here on Backcountry.

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Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer wrote an answer about on May 15, 2013

Yes, and for that reason, many gyms won't let you use it. This harness is designed for tying into directly, and not intended for multiple falls and prolonged loading. It's more suited to ski mountaineering and other light uses where you're not likely to take a full factor fall.
If you're looking for an inexpensive harness with a belay loop, look at the BD Momentum AL. I've had mine a little over a year and I love it. Very comfortable and safe.

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Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer wrote an answer about on May 15, 2013

Basically, you don't want a pack very much larger than the cargo you intend to carry. The reason for that is even with compression straps, your load can shift around and throw your pack off balance. At the least it's annoying, and at the worst, an off-center load can injure your back, make you roll your ankle or torque your knee.

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Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer wrote an answer about on May 13, 2013

I second Phil's notion.
Wind goes right through standard fleeces. It sounds like you'd be better served by a softshell acket. Most softshells are uninsulated, but some manufacturers make insulated ones.
I have a softshell that has a fleece lining, and worn alone, it's warm down to the mid 40's F. I won't mention the brand, since it's the house brand of another outdoor outfitter. You should be able to find something similar here at Backcountry.

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Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer wrote an answer about on May 13, 2013

It is an inflatable pad, no inner insulation, save for air. Being airtight, it is also waterproof and the nylon will not wick or hold water very well. It should dry quickly.
It doesn't pack down very small so it's not suited for backpacking, but it should serve well for your intended use.

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Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer wrote an answer about on May 11, 2013

There's a product called Shoe-Goo that is availible in just about any shoe store/department. I've been using it for over 20 years, and a repair made with it will typically outlast the article being repaired. It is improtant to make sure what youe are repairing is COMPLETELY clean and dry for it to work properly. Otherwise, the repair will fail in a month or so.

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Pat Palmer

Pat Palmer wrote an answer about on May 8, 2013

I don't have experience with this tent, but I do own some of their packs and sleeping bags, and have used their other tents.
Alps is fine for warmer season camping. Thier products are very light and easy to pack, but quality suffers a little for it.
I trust Alps for general 3-season backpacking and camping here in the Blue Ridge, but for Winter or on high windy peaks I go with Black Diamond, Outdoor Research, and MSR.

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