Free Shipping on Orders Over $50 - Some Exclusions Apply*
  • 1-800-409-4502

  • Live Chat with a Gearhead

  • 100% Guaranteed Returns

Oregonguy

Oregonguy

David's Passions

Camping
Paddling

David's Bio

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on May 29, 2010

5 5

Land Sharks mount to both Yakima and rectangular Thule-style bars, but you need Yakima's adapters for factory cross-bars, another $40 to $50, depending on the source. The Land Sharks are somewhat flexible, so they do conform a bit to hull shapes, but not much. Mine are over six years old, mounted on a Thule rack and have had heavy use. No cracks, fading or hardware issues. Something to be aware of is that on most mid-size and some full-size rigs, you can only fit one kayak on the roof using carriers like this. Your rig's width at the ground is one thing. After the cabin area angles in, the factory rack width is even narrower. For two kayaks with these carriers, you'll need the full-meal deal: Complete Yakima or Thule rack system with bars. Check their fit guides.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on December 30, 2008

5 5

I have worked and played in the outdoor industry for nearly 30 years and have had the opportunity to try nearly everything companies have to offer. Keeping the head and torso warm has always been a priority, and in my younger years, I pretty much ignored the bottom half. Keep the rain and snow off and I was ok. At age 59, however, reality set in. I needed a well constructed and warm pant to keep the Southern hemisphere intact. Enter the Compressor pant from Mtn. Hardwear. I purchased this pant solely on reviews from other back country skiers and climbers, took a chance and now offer this review.
First thing I did was turn the pant inside out to look at the stitching. I couldn't find any stitching. I don't know what it's called--lap stitching or fold-it-over-and-hide-it stitching, but the point is, there are no exposed threads except perhaps on the inner elastic waistband.
The insulation, labeled Thermic Micro, insulates, compresses and feels like down. Get it wet, however, and unlike down, it still insulates. The butt and knees are reinforced nylon, and although I wouldn't slide down the side of Mt. St. Helens in them, it's a durable fabric. The legs have full zips with a hook and loop closure at the ankle, there's a full zip fly and more hook and loop closures at the waist. A nice touch is the fleece lined pockets. Fit is good. My 30" inseam demands that I use suspenders to keep the cuffs off the snow with the medium size. I've used this pant backcountry skiing and lift served skiing with the addition of gaiters to keep sharp ski edges off the pant cuffs. In cross-country ski touring in 12 degree weather, creating a lot of heat, I had to stop and vent them, even though it was just my bare legs underneath--no long johns on. What a problem to have in cold weather--being too warm. All for bit over a pound in weight. So, that's the long of it. The short of it is that these are the best cold weather pants I've ever worn, and I've worn all the brands, believe me. The label says Made in China and you can take that for what it's worth. They are very well constructed and well thought out. My final opinion: The best cold-weather pants for the money on the market.

(1)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on December 29, 2008

5 5

I installed Thule tracks on my naked roof Subaru and then installed the Tracker II feet on the TK1 kits. Check with Thule to find out what kit you need for your rack. They are sold separately and that adds about thirty bucks to the cost. The Tracker II feet are a real no-brainer to install. Simply drop them onto the TK bases and you're done. To move the feet back and forth in the tracks, you need to remove the feet and use a supplied hex tool to slide the TK bases in the tracks. Get it? The real beauty of this system is the one button installation/removal. Once the foot adapters are installed in the tracks simply push the lock button (unlocked, of course) and lift the entire rack off your car. Unlocked, I can install or remove my rack with whatever accessories are attached, in less than 20 seconds. One caveat--the feet have a bit of wiggle in them if there's no load, but are rock solid when load is applied. All in all, a very nice design and worth the money. If you change cars, you can use it on most other rigs with a track system, but will probably have to buy a different TK base. Always check Thule's fit guide and you'll be fine.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a question about on December 28, 2008

I know you're getting a lot of "size" questions, but here's one more. 5'7", 165lbs., short legs, long torso. The jacket is not for fashion but for alpine and some back country skiing. Layering with synthetic vest or fleece, but I will occasionally wear my Sub-Zero down jacket underneath. So, will the small be too small?Thanks--you folks make an excellent product.

(0)

 

0 Answers

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on February 6, 2008

2 5

I read Lady_Blackwater's review and agree. And by the way, I work at a retailer that sells this product. This is a good product, well made, by a company that's been in the water sports business for some time. Long ago, I enrolled in a Technical Writing course at my local community college and I know how to write. It is my opinion, for whatever it is worth, that Harmony, and a score of other companies out there, could do themselves and their customers a favor by hiring ANYONE with a command of the English language and bit of common sense to write instructions, with line drawings or pictures, to everything needing installation that they sell. If they do not or cannot accomplish this, then I believe it is wise for the consumer to spend their money elsewhere. Read this, Harmony......I do sell your stuff.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 29, 2008

5 5

The best compromise in a ski/board pant that I've seen, and I've worked in outdoor retail for many years. These pants beat the big names by a mile. The North Face, Burton, Columbia--they all cost the same or more, but for a 10k waterproof/10g breathable pant, I believe this pant is a much better value. Durability is good--I'm a skier, not a boarder, and the cuffs are tuff enough to ward off cuts from ski edges. Waterproofing is excellent--sitting on a wet Oregon chairlift for 15 minutes is the true test of a pant. Chugging hard up a ten degree slope for an hour in Randonee gear creates a bunch of heat, and the fabric's breathability along with the cool vents on the inside of the thighs get the heat out. Nice touch. The mesh lining is not too light or too heavy. I turned the pant inside out and the seams are nicely sewn. There is some quality construction here. No problems with any zippers so far. The "style" is cool, even for an old guy. My warning about the fit--go smaller than you normally would. I have a 34" waist, 30" inseam, took a chance and bought Small-they fit perfect. Pockets are nicely angled, fabric is tough, water-proof/breathable claims are true. Bottom lines is, these pants are excellent. I never heard of Sessions before cruising your site, but I will keep an eye their other offerings.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 29, 2008

5 5

All you gotta due is suck on it, just like you do with a Camelbak bladder mouthpiece and the rest is bliss. No more tipping, no more dripping, no more sloppy sipping. Remember when you were a new-born? Same gig. This is a great bedside bottle as well as a hiking, biking and tent bottle. Clean the the drinking tube with water and lemon juice after a camping trip to keep it fresh. As for leakage, well, if anything full of water tips over, including us old folks, there's gonna be some leakage. Just stay upright and you'll be good.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 29, 2008

3 5

The biggest drawback of the soft CamelBak reservoirs is draining them dry. With Platypus reservoirs, you simply blow them up a bit by mouth and let them drain and dry. CamelBak's soft material won't allow that. Now, this bit of twelve-dollar plastic does work as advertised, but rather than spend money on what probably cost eleven cents to manufacture in China, I use a twelve-ounce empty Coors can, although most other brands works just as well. Simply slip the empty can through the filler hole, hang the entire unit upside down to drain and dry and you're done. If you're the fastidious type, you may want to rearrange the can once or twice to drain any water that was trapped between Coors and CamelBak. On sale, Coors costs about $3.99 for a sixer. That's six dry-outs or, if you're like me, one dry-out and a nice buzz. Figure out what your priorities are.

(2)

 

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 29, 2008

5 5

This system is so simple that with just a bit of common sense, anyone can figure out how to install them. The "towers", as they are called, clamp onto the side rails of most factory racks, gripping the Yak bar and the side rail simultaneously as you tighten them--but not all. Some early Subaru Foresters require their own towers and there may be a few other cars out there that this product doesn't fit. Nissan Xterra's need something altogether different. So check out Yak's website or call them. Unfortunately, some dealers out there don't know how to read the Yak Fit Guide, so beware. This is a quality product, similar to Thule's 400XT, but each brand must match up to it's own round or square bars. Spendy, but it goes with you when you sell your cherished K-Car.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 29, 2008

4 5

This ski/board carrier is nice looking as well as practical. My older version fits only Thule bars, but the latest version has a universal bar clamp that works with Thule, Yak, and most factory cross-bars, Nissan Xterra excluded. Easy installation, but don't lose the included Torx tool. It's similar to a hex, or Allen wrench, but fits only Torx head screws and it has a "security" feature, which is a tiny hole in the middle that mates to a pin on the Torx head screw. It makes it hard for a thief to steal your Thule ski/board carrier, but also makes it hard for you to remove it if you don't have the tool. In fact, it's darn near impossible. Locks are included, a nice touch. Lifetime guarantee--keep your receipt.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 29, 2008

5 5

This simple canister fuel stove proves that simple is usually better. It boils water quickly, is fairly quiet and weighs under four ounces and packs small enough to fit in your parka pocket. Maybe that's how it got its name. It requires no maintenance. Remove it from it's plastic box, screw it on your canister, put a match to it and you're cooking. The only minor drawback is stability. A small "footprint" for a large pot of water requires some thoughtful placement, but common sense takes care of that problem. Simmering is not it's strong suit, but I don't simmer my freeze-dry chili with beans. I cook them. Bottom line--this is an excellent, nearly weightless, budget canister stove that is bomb-proof. For a weight-savvy backpacker, it works well.

(1)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 18, 2008

4 5

There are two ways to get rid of wind noise from car racks--Get some good speakers and turn up the volume or install a fairing, Yak or Thule on your rack bars. The fairing is also a nice place to put stickers for whatever else you think is cool. The fairing from Yak works as good as the better looking one from Thule. Hey, all they do is direct fast flowing air over the rack bars. Without the bars, fast flowing air howls, screams and whines. (That's where the good speakers come in handy.) It's all simple aerodynamics. Direct the air flow over the round or square thing that is not aerodynamic and things will settle down. Ask the U. S. Air Force. Ask all those aliens that have those flying saucer things. They know.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 15, 2008

5 5

This kayak rack item is a well crafted, nice looking and relatively inexpensive answer to carrying your boats. You can put four kayaks on a small car securely with some effort. It's a bit harder to turn your kayak up on its side and strap in down to the Stacker than it is to slide it up on a cradle carrier, but if you need to carry more than two kayaks and cost is an issue, then this carrier fills the bill. It fits 95% of factory crossbars and works with Yak bars as well. The J style carriers from Thule and Yak work fine, but check out the cost. The Stackers fold down when not in use--helps a bit with gas mileage and looks better. My advice is to strap each kayak to the Stacker and then another strap around both kayaks and the Stacker. More straps means bomb-proof security at 70mph, not to mention the turbulence from big rigs on the interstate. This is a good looking kayak carrier that delivers. Easy on, easy off.

(2)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 9, 2008

5 5

Take the 20% off offer because this item is rarely on sale at the walk-in stores. You can see how it works at most outdoor stores that have a National Geo Map Machine. (REI, Joe's Outdoor, Dick's, Sportsman's Warehouse--why spend money at those money-grubbing employee abusing retailers?) Keep in mind that the home version does much more than the in-store Map Machine. With the home version you can highlight your trails, etc. and use a 3-D Fly over effect that in reality is more entertaining than useful but it's fun to play with. Your maps at home will print smaller than the Map Machine version unless you have a printer and paper capable of printing the Map Machine version. Warning: if you have an ink-hog printer, you will use up your ink cartridges quickly after you become addicted to printing out all the maps you want. You will first download the install disc and then use separate discs for different regions of your state. My Idaho state version has five separate discs, so I have to load another separate disc when I venture outside a given area. No big deal. You could download the whole works if you have a terabyte to play with, but it still would not be practical. Go play with the Map Machine at an outdoor store and you'll love it. Just remember that the home version does more.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 9, 2008

4 5

This little stake-out tent is perfect for a solo hiker, a bit crowded for two. My 5'7" frame and expedition pack fit perfectly. Full coverage rainfly, decent vestibule, great ventilation and absurdly easy set-up make it a winner. The Zoid design is a copy of the tried and true Kelty Zen, with rainfly variations, which was a copy of the early tried and true Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight and that was no doubt a copy of something else. A good, basic design that works well in nearly all conditions. It does need a buffer when pitched where high winds are expected. Still, a very good value.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 8, 2008

4 5

If you're into doing your own waxing, be it XC or alpine, you'll may consider "corking" your wax into your ski/board. "Corking" is an old school way of heating up the wax you've crayoned on your base. If you don't know what I mean by crayoning, then delete this and stay in town with your skateboard. If you don't have an iron, corking does work and it gives you a nice workout besides. In the old days, a real cork created from a cork tree was used to rub crayoned wax into ski bases. The simple friction of rubbing a natural cork along a base covered with wax melted the wax into the base. Certainly not as effective as a hot wax iron but effective nonetheless. These days, a foam cork has replaced the natural cork because it creates more friction (heat) than real cork. I don't know what's worse, saving cork trees (look it up) from extinction or using foam, a petroleum product we get from you know where. Either way, if you don't have an iron (woops, electricity involved), then this Swix synthetic cork works quite well.

(3)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 8, 2008

5 5

If you have any brand waterproof/breathable gear and it needs a "boost", this stuff is it. Actually, I think it's the only product on the market for restoration of W/B fabrics. I've used it on fabrics laminated or coated, and it restores water proofing to like-new status. Best application is at least two LIGHT coatings an hour or two apart. It's a simple cost-effective application for expensive over-priced W/B fabrics. Hey, there really is no such thing as waterproof-breathable. They just have a guvment standard to meet to qualify. When your guvment standard wears out, try this stuff. Saves you some bucks in the long run.

(3)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 8, 2008

5 5

I bought this shoe, (the men's version), after using a friend's pair at camp on a pack trip. I laughed at him for bringing these goofy looking sandals along, but after trying them on, I bought a pair the first day back home. Croc calls the material resin and I suppose that's the scientific word, but foam is what I see and feel on my feet. These sandals are very comfy, very lightweight, fairly durable and look just goofy enough to let everyone know you're not with the mainstream of society.
Bare skin or light sox, they feel great. The foam molds quickly to your foot shape, like a Birkenstock, only much quicker.
Wearing them around on concrete or asphalt will wear them down quickly, though.
On sandy beaches, you'll find lots of sand getting in through the crocodile teeth, but those vents are necessary--otherwise your feet will sweat.
A very nice product at a reasonable price and they come in all kinds of really weird colors.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Oregonguy

Oregonguy wrote a review of on January 4, 2008

4 5

I read the other review and respectfully disagree, but not because the reviewer is wrong. The purpose of this gummi is to remove light rust, light burrs and to polish steel edges. It is meant to be a follow-up, if need be, to a coarse, medium or fine diamond stone, tools that are intended to remove the big burrs and smooth very rough imperfections on the steel.
I use this gummi for polishing and detuning with very good results and have been using this or one like it for a decade.
Perhaps the fault lies with the marketing types who have given this item the name "edge grinding rubber". Leave off the word "grinding" and you have an apt description of the tool.
Shame on you Toko. Tell it like it is.

(0)

 

0 Comments

load more