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Noah Singer

Noah Singer

Park City, UT

Noah Singer's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Skiing
Climbing
Biking
Running

Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 31, 2015

Wide, strong and light. Not cheap.
5 5

A flatbar is not as simple as it seems. You need to account for strength, feel, size and sweep. Enve nails them all here. They have an amazing reputation with their bars, unlike players like Easton. Feel is the carbon... not all is created equal. Myself and a few riding buddies used to ride a Truvativ Noir, their top of the line. It was way too stiff in some engineering way and rattled us silly. This doesn't. Finally, this has just enough sweep, the slight bend back as you get towards the grips. It's really perfect. 760mm is a great XC width these days, and can always be cut down if needed.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 31, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

It's really nice that Mavic offers such a simple swap so you can keep the second most expensive part of your bike while upgrading parts. The instructions not very clear but I was able to get the job done. Here's the only complaint, making this 4 instead of 5 start. When swapping there are four TINY springs you must move from the old freehub body to this one. If you loose even one on the garage floor you are screwed. I doubt local bike shops would have any stocked, you might get lucky in their junk drawer though. So -- execution is simple but go into your "clean room so you don't loose a spring.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've ridden Continental X-King tires for years. I finally switched to these b/c of the good reviews and they looked more XC. They are light, I run them tubeless just fine even in rock-garden infested Utah. They corner well and the wide spacing makes them incredibly versatile. Put them on and forget about them...

...forget about them until they wear out. My rear wore out after 275 hot summer miles. I ride pretty hard, but this was soon than I had hoped. The front is still going strong. I replaced the rear with the Barzo so look for a review coming on that.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Calling this a jersey is like calling Chuck Taylors basketball shoes in today's terms. It works as such, but is more casual than tech. It's 100% cotton afterall. The raglan style is slick and the color is top notch. Ride hard in the cool evenings and head straight to the bar without looking like Joe Fred thinking he's in the Tour de France.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I loath a big saddle bag. The only thing I loathe more is breaking down 40 miles from home in the mountains with no tools/tube. This bag works on my 29er MTB. It barely fits these contents- but does: 29" tube, 16g Co2, 20g Co2, tire lever (cut down) mini Co2 head.

In the past I had a problem with velcro wearing out, so I use a Voile strap around the seatrails and bag to keep it in place. I also suggest that strap incase of an emergency of other sorts; that's why it's called "backcountry duct tape".

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

Solid as a rock. rolls right over them
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I'm on my second Highball now, both 29ers. In between I had a Scott Spark 29er (read: XC speed) and a Santa Cruz 5010 (read: fun). I've come full circle and I'm back on the trusty Highball. Aside from it also being the name of my post-ride cocktail, there are many things to love about the latest iteration of this trusty machine. For full disclosure, I work for Competitive Cyclist; now here is why I say that. At one point, 7 of 10 fastest employees rode this bike. We loved it, most had it geared, a few had it setup single speed with a Philcentric BB (which is great).

Whats' new and great: the aqua color is radical. The internal routing makes the frame look really slick to match the pilot. That said, it's a total bitch to setup. for the rear brake, which was the worst I had to cut the hose and feed it from ass-end forward. Starting at the rear brake mount I tried to route it into the internal sleeve and after about 40 minutes and enough brake oil spilled to mistake it for a job owned by British Petroleum by the time I was done. Amazingly, the Shimano XT brakes (which I praise too) accepted a new sleeve on the end and actually feel 95% of what they should.

The rear derailleur cable rattles a bit in the frame. After 350 miles I still haven't fixed it, I will call Santa Cruz soon. I'm usually in the zone so much with my Spotify rocking that I don't notice it.

The frame is strong as nails. I shred hard. I've broken a few frames from said shredding. I've never broken a SCZ though and have no plans on this being the first.

Geometry is perfect. If I ever order a custom frame (for material/style/ride), I will reference this geometry chart.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

The Tesla is faster than the Ferrari
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Reference the title; A Tesla is about $80k and can do 0-60 faster than a $450k Ferrari. Now, it should also be pointed out that the Tesla built completely different. While these XT brakes are not fundamentally different than any other hydraulic disc brake out there, they work just as well or better than the more expensive type. I've ridden very nice bikes for years and I always equip them with XT brakes. Never XTR, never, NEVER SRAM/Avid. I'd prefer to save that money and put it elsewhere that will improve performance in a noticeable way. Get these brakes and you won't be disappointed. I promise.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on July 28, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

POC is a design focused company, but from what I'm learning first-hand that doesn't always always include research and development. These shorts look great in the photos and such, I dig the subtle design. The material is a nice weight, not too light or heavy. My reason for return was the length. I am more XC than DH, so let that be known. These hung way too far over the knee for me, even when seated on the bike. It would drive me bonkers to pedal with that rubbing over the front of me knee.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on June 24, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it
Fit: Runs small
Height: 6' 0"
Weight: 155 lbs
Size Purchased: 30

I tried a pair of these on at the Black Diamond retail store in SLC. I expected the 32 to be perfect since that's what I wear in most other brands. It was too big, so they had a black 30in to try on. It was perfect in the waist and leg. I wanted the purple color but they only had black in my size. So I saw the 30in purple on Backcountry and pulled the trigger. When they showed up they fit about 3 inches small all the way around. The same size I tried on there was now too small. I was very bummed and now BC doesn't have the 32 so I'm back to my Patagonia 31in inseam shorts that are consistent.

These had great intentions, so if you can find a pair that fit you'll love the stretch and style.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on May 20, 2015

One pair of pants with the pockets of 2
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size
Height: 6' 0"
Weight: 155 lbs
Size Purchased: 32x31

I have initial impressions, let's start by making that clear. I've worn my Osloh Crank pants for a few days and commuted in them, like I do to work everyday. My background is deep in racing road and MTB so my second skin is a chamois or baggy short. I currently own Rapha Jeans, Levi’s Commuter and a nice pair of pants from NAU that do the job well. I was eager to try another purpose built item.

It is clear that fashion is the focus here, and a very particular take on it. The packaging is actually very cool, and I can tell expensive. The color hint there and on the inside of the pants is Purple, that’s a statement.

I’m 6’0” 155lbs and the 32x31 is the size for me. The waist is a bit big but I used the snap to bring it in.

Out of the box I couldn’t believe how many pockets there were. I counted 10 pockets. By comparison the traditional denim jean as 5 (including that “Zippo” pocket). Why would I need 10 pockets when I am commuting, I am certainly wearing a small pack to store my stuff in? To me, these get a bit in the way of the flex but are somewhat made up for with the ample amount of stretch these pants provide. I mean, they really stretch and that is very welcoming. I am interested to see how that holds up over time and miles.

The overly reinforced crotch is the focal point. It actually does work on the bike, you can feel a bit of padding. You would never want to ride command because the amount of seams in there would eat you like a cheese grader. Also, you can feel the “chamois" a bit when walking around. If you are used to a bike chamois like myself this is not a big deal, but if you aren’t I can almost guarantee it will feel more like a pair of Huggies.

The reinforced lower right leg is an obvious must because of the drivetrain rub from your bike. The snap down there is nice too.

There is no reflective material, this itself looses a start. You don’t need to look like captain safety but subtle hints and using newer materials that are toned-down during daylight hours should be a requirement for commuter pants.

Overall, if you live in the big city and appreciate the Osloh style & want to make a statement, these seem to be a good fit. On the other hand, if you want minimalism in your pant this is definitely not the one for you, try the Levi’s Commuter instead.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on May 7, 2015

Solid and simple
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

You don't need a carbon bar. ProTour riders often pick the aluminum variety because if your bike simply tips over and you crack a carbon bar under your bar tape you won't know until it sheers in two crossing that cattle-guard at 36mph. There is no rotational weight here so a savings in grams in hardly noticed. Opt for the aluminum variety, save a ton of money and risk, and ultimately look more PRO. This one has a traditional shape which means you'll be a bit lower when in the drops. The subtle flats on top are very nice, especially on rough roads. The added surface area reduces fatigue in your hands, then arms, then shoulders...and so on, putting more watts to your legs and core where it matters.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on April 23, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I ride a set of Enve M60's with DT 240 hubs. People often ask me if they should get these hubs or Chris King on their next bike. My response -- Basically, you get Chris King if you want to prance around and say you have a quality hub, then at night you don?t mind working on it. You get DT Swiss if you actually want a quality hub and at night you?d rather ride then just drink a few beers after.

I've had both and put a lot of miles on each. King is good, but has a break-in period, that is longer than a few rides and requires constant adjustment to keep them running like a tight ship. As far as DT, I've never touched them.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerposted an image about on March 11, 2015

Also consider the Roamer Leash

This is a great idea and I can appreciate it being the owner of two super-human labs. However, for over a year I've accomplished the same thing with the Ruffwear Roamer leash. I like it because I've used a retired carabiner to walk both my dogs at once on this single leash. It has a handle loop at the bottom which I hook to and, boom, both are at the end and there is only one leash. See it here-- http://www.backcountry.com/ruffwear-roamer-leash

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a review of on March 11, 2015

More PRO than CON
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Here's the thing, I love this leash for a few reasons, my wife thinks less of it for another. Here's the full picture, you can make your decision. 1) I like it because the elastic keeps the leash from tangling around Lola's feet as she walks slowly (which rarely happens). 2) I like it because I've used a retired carabiner to walk both my dogs at once on this single leash. It has a handle loop at the bottom which I hook to and, boom, both are at the end and there is only one leash. 3) The clip on my human side of the leash is great for hooking them to a light pole when I run inside the store to grab basil, pinenuts and a six-pack for tonights pasta dinner. 4) Now, my wife likes all those things too, but she takes points away because the elastic actually does make it hard to hold the dogs back from jumping on somebody in tight places. They basically have extra room to pull if they want it. Oh, 5), it's super rugged. Damn Lola ran off for three hours in the woods once and came home with a muddy leash but the buckle is fine and abrasion is minimal.

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Noah Singer

Noah Singerwrote a question about on January 22, 2015

Although I am typically not a fan of Schwalbe because of the horrific luck I've had with cuts, the tread pattern of this tire looks ideal for long gravel grinder races like the Leadville Trail 100. That race I have done, and if there tire were around in 2011 I would have considered it. The other part is that it's a 29er, which is the only wheel that should be ridden at those types of races. Does anyone have first hand experience?

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