Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer

Laurel Highlands, Tussey Ridge, PA Mid-State Trail, Brooks Range AK, Chugach Mtns AK, Front Range CO

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Nicholas Geyer's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Climbing

Nicholas Geyer's Bio

I'm 24 yrs old and an aspiring hiker and survivalist. I'll be climbing Denali in Spring of 2012 as well as a host of other tough Colorado residing mountains.

Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote a review of on April 2, 2012

5 5

As I was searching for a quick summer backpack stove I was set to buy the cheaper PocketRocket from MSR, until I came upon the Microrocket. This is in many ways the upgraded version of the trusty and reliable PocketRocket. Just think of this: less bulk, wider base, more stable frame than the Pocketrocket. It operates exactly how the Pocketrocket is operated: simple and quick. I was highly impressed with its fuel usage (nearly identical to its older brother) and fuel compatibility (uses any isopro fuel canister). If you are looking for a sturdy, light, and retooled version of the Pocketrocket look no further than this stove.

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote a review of on February 27, 2012

5 5

This is the first pair of snowshoes I ever used and boy did it treat me! Looking at the basic design, these are your plastic frame snowshoe. They take a beating in the snow, but their flexibility and give make traveling over rocky areas a breeze. You do not have to worry about rips or tares with these. The binding was a little questionable. It's one solid step in binding, with a heel strap and an arch strap. I thought it would be flimsy, but I was wrong and held firm. Another concern would be balling around the binding, but this didn't truly happen either. The crampons were solid carbon steel which made the entire shoe a little heavy, but grip on a couple of frozen lakes was superb. There was no heel support with this model like you may see on a similar MSR brand for this price, but I was actually passing people up hill with the grip I had on these. All in all, very well built.

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote an answer about on October 31, 2011

I would say that this would be a good bag for a pretty darn cold night, maybe not true arctic like conditions. Keep in mind that your warmth is dependent upon several factors which include: The bag, the shelter, clothing and your body. The shell is pretty decent, it should be able to stop winds in their tracks, but keep in mind that the temperature rating given is not always up to par. A good -30 bag may be useful to -10 depending on weather conditions. Mountain Hardware is known for its' durability and dependability in cold weather, so I would say this should live up to its name for you.

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote a review of on August 22, 2011

5 5

Like the other reviewers, the Momentum AL by BD is a fantastic and affordable harness for your rock/ice climbing needs. I've found that its pretty darn durable and very light (didn't notice it while climbing some of the Flat Irons in Boulder). I've had little problems putting it on or off and it can become rather compact for a trek, if you so choose. Honestly, I've trusted the value I get from Black Diamond for years now and bottom line: this harness didn't disappoint me.

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote a review of on August 22, 2011

5 5

Over the years, I've learned Black Diamond tends to put lots most affordable and comfortable gear at low prices (relatively). That being said, when I started using my Half Dome I was a bit wary of how it would field considering it is possibly one of the more inexpensive of the climbing helmets. Boy was I wrong! This helmet is light enough that I do not feel it on my head and it fits perfectly (I've got a rather big head). Looking at its safety, I've used this from rock climbing in the Front Range of Colorado, to mountaineering the mighty 14ers, to ice climbing and still this gear takes and takes abuse. I would like to note that the interior is a bicycle like safety foam, which I'm alright with, but for some more avid enthusiast looking for a more "climbing inspired" helmet the Petzl Elios might work a bit better. The ventilation is a little closed for my liking, but it gets the job done. All in all, for the price, comfortableness, and safety the Half Dome is a great investment for the beginner or intermediate climber.

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote a review of on April 7, 2011

5 5

After having these for a year and doing some serious trekking along the way, I believe these are some of the best sunglasses for an active outdoor enthusiast. The design is very sleek and relaxed into your face. For me, it was fitting and comfortable from the moment I put them on. The rhyno tuff frame can take a beating and if the frame does happen to break the warranty is fantastic and LIFETIME. In comparison to other rival companies, Native, in my humble opinion, has one of the best track records and customer service provision you will find. Great investment, will buy more in the future

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote an answer about on March 11, 2011

I used a similar Gregory pack, but a mens version, before. I guess it depends on how long the "long" trek will be. In my opinion, the size of this pack is great for medium range treks, from 3-4 days. If you are careful in what you pack, you could stretch it to a day or two more. If not, I would recommend a larger pack.

The gregory brand is a solid label. I've never had a problem with their packs and they tend to have POCKETS!! The ripstop fabric should withstand the beating the A.T. tends to give some people in the more rigorous sections.

HAVE FUN ON YOUR TRIP!

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote a review of on March 31, 2010

4 5

I've learned anything from Gerber is quality. This knife is a fixed full tang (meaning the steel to make the blade extends to the hilt) giving it a much stronger and durable design. The blade does not dull easily and can cut through ample sized wood. The price does not break the bank and your paying for a lifetime warranty. Great buy.

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote a review of on March 31, 2010

5 5

My first major pack was of the Kelty Red Cloud variety (5600 cu in). This pack offers benefits of any expedition-type pack with the comfort level that I have come to know of Kelty. First, its simple. You get pockets (5), four of which are outside. Plenty of space in the interior compartment and a space for your sleeping bag. Secondly, the weight distribution is excellent. The pack, once fitted, sits comfortably on your hips and the distribution flows straight through the legs. Straps and buckling system make even the novice work the distribution of weight with ease. The fabric is polyester, but can take a beating like the best ripstop nylon and even if it does rip you have a lifetime warranty from Kelty. I currently use a Kelty Durango (5900 cu in.), but anyone looking for a great buy and a durable pack look no further than Red Cloud from Kelty

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote an answer about on March 31, 2010

This bag has a length that extends from 6' to 6'6" depending on your size. That being said sleeping pads are all about your personal preference and comfort level. I prefer blow up pads from Therm-a-Rest. They compress and are rather easy to carry and inflate. Remember sleeping pads are made to approximately the same length and dimensions as standard sleeping bags.

Here are a couple of suggestions:
http://www.backcountry.com/outdoorgear/Therm-a-Rest-Trail-Sleeping-Pad/CAS0295M.html <--- Cheap, inflatable, and comfortable to me.
http://www.backcountry.com/outdoorgear/Big-Agnes-Air-Core-Sleeping-Pad/BAG0011M.html <--- By Big Agnes. A little more expensive, but you are more cushioned (in my opinion).

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote an answer about on March 30, 2010

From my experience, the typical mountain bike helmet ranges from 10-12 ounces. This particular headlamp is 6 ounces which is roughly half the weight of the helmet. If you add the two together, you get about a 16-18 oz on your head, which may or may not be heavy depending on your level of comfortableness. The triple strap design is effective to keeping the lamp on your head and steady. My personal headlamp is a single loop around the head and that tends to fall off, but the triple strap does act somewhat like a hat in stability. This product should be decent in keeping stable during rocky descents.

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Nicholas Geyer

Nicholas Geyer wrote an answer about on March 30, 2010

In metric the dimension the pack has a holding capacity of 25 to 27 L (reg and tall accordingly) This particular pack has a pocket on the outside (known as a kangaroo) and 2 mesh pockets for holding your various water bottles and what not. The interior contains the main compartment which can hold a 13 inch laptop (netbook) standard to give you an idea of how large this is.

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