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NATHANIEL K.

NATHANIEL K.

NATHANIEL K.'s Passions

Hiking & Camping

NATHANIEL K.

NATHANIEL K.wrote a review of on January 2, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I had an old speed 30 and thought it was good,except for the goofy ice link attachment. When BD came out with the new speed packs I bought the new speed 30 which uses a more popular type of attachment for tools, and has improvements in other ways too. I was so happy with it, that I went for the Speed 22 also, since I needed a lighter alpine pack that would climb better as a leader or follower. I've used it a few times now and can say it performs as advertised.

The straps are well sized and placed, and I don't think having lower side compression straps is necessary...the pack is slim enough that if you pack it well the load won't shift or need to be compressed there anyway, and it's a pair less straps to be getting tangled in your gear, etc. All the other features are just what you need, and no more (removable crampon patch straps, hydration sleeve, removable lid and waist strap). The rope catch is a must on this also, since you won't fit a Rope in this pack. It secures tightly and cleanly over the top with the rope catch and side compression straps. My only complaint on all the speed packs is that the material is perhaps too lightweight to last a lifetime or be dragging around the crag (still feels more durable than 80% of light packs out there) - this pack is definitely not a crag pack, but for alpine days or ice climbing, it's so awesome.

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NATHANIEL K.

NATHANIEL K.wrote a review of on January 9, 2011

5 5

I was in the market for a large expedition pack for glacier mountaineering. I have a 17-17.5" torso, so I chose to go with the Small pack. However, my 32" waist and larger chest/shoulders require a medium belt/shoulder pads. I contacted Gregory and sent them my small straps, and (after a few hiccups), got some medium shoulder straps and hip belts.Unlike some other packs I tried - that claim to be adjustable for wider ranges of torsos - this one actually felt comfortable carrying loads when sized for me. For example, I tried a Lowa Alpine Cerro Torre and found it really fatigued my shoulders and sagged/swayed under loads heavier than ~60pounds.Before I bought this pack I read reviews and strongly considered the Deuter ACT 90+10 (or NOLS version) and MH BMG. The Deuters got some bad reviews for not being too durable and the MH got some bad reviews for comfort - don't know if this is true, but that's the impressions I got. However, I couldn't find any "bad" reviews for the Denali Pro - the only consistent downside was weight. However, as I soon confirmed on my own, this added weight is due to this packs ability to distribute and stabilize even very heavy loads. Think of it this way: If you're hauling 75lbs of gear, what's an extra couple of pounds of base-pack weight (negligible), especially if it makes that 75lbs feel like 25lbs?My first impressions of the pack when I received it: Wow, this thing is professional grade. The materials are all heavy duty, the stitching is ample and re-enforced where needed, the zippers, buckles, webbing, internal heavy mesh, etc are all "heavy duty". I suspect this thing will last a lifetime.Custom fitting the pack is fairly easy. Once you get the right hipbelts and shoulder straps, these attach quickly and easily. The shoulder straps can be attached in an upper or 1" lower position to further tune the pack to your torso (I chose the upper for my torso).My first trek was a day trip, only 9 miles with 45lbs with no issues. Subsequent treks, with more load (up to 75 lbs), and the pack still feels like it could carry more, and my body doesn't nearly get as fatigued or sore as with other packs. The pack feels very stable. I haven't used it on any extended mountaineering trips yet, but will come back to update after logging some more trips.

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