Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys

East Coast

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Matthew's Passions

Alpine Touring
Trail Running
Hiking
Alpine Skiing
Kayaking
Bouldering

Matthew's Bio

To some people skiing is a hobby. To others a sport. To quite a few, it's a passion. But to me, it's life. Hucking cliffs, floating in deep pow, and tackling steep lines truly is heaven on earth.

I am definitely an outdoors enthusiast, and I love taking advantage of all that nature has to offer us. The water, the mountains, the fresh air, the peace and quiet, what else can you ask for? It's almost medicinal.

Even though I'd consider myself an outdoor enthusiast, skiing is what I think about the most and where I devote the most time. My first turns were at Stowe when I was 3 years old, and since then I've spent every winter on skis. I started skiing a lot in college and the big mountain bug really caught me senior year after watching TGR's Tangerine Dream. I bought a pair of Line Motherships, my first pair of "fat skis" and the rest is history.

Last year I got into backcountry skiing, and that's my latest passion and hobby. Earning your turns is an awesome experience and opens up new doors in terms of what and where you can ski. Not that skiing ever gets boring, but this adds a whole new level of excitement.

Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on November 19, 2011

The binding itself will fit. There's no adult length or width ski that will cause problems with or will prevent you from mounting these bindings on them. Where you will run into issues is the brakes. Even the wider brake option is too narrow. To fix this you could do one of two things. You could bend the brakes to fit. Or you could remove the brakes and ride the ski without them. Many people choose not to use the brakes on wide skis as they are pretty much useless except for holding the skis together when carrying them. Also without the brakes you do save some weight.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on November 15, 2011

As far as burliness and stiffness, the Mobe ranks up there with the best of them. But be careful with sizing. Scarpa sizing runs differently. A 26.5 and 27 have the same size shell and bsl. Whereas most companies a 26 and 26.5 have the same size shell and bsl. So if you order the 26.5 you might run into the same problems you did with the endorphins. Definitely try them on and go see a bootfitter to see if they are right size for you so you don't run into the same sizing problems later.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on November 8, 2011

I don't know the exact numbers but it is only a few millimeters. It is a very small number and a very low stack height. If i were to venture a guess from eyeballing it on memory I would say about 3mm. It really is very low.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on November 8, 2011

David's right about using AT boots. If you are going to use an AT boot with this setup, make sure it has an ISO DIN sole, since you will be using your alpine bindings. At this point, marker bindings are NOT compatible with the MFD Alltime. Only Salomon/Atomic bindings, Look/Rossignol bindings, and Head/Tyrolia/4frnt bindings. Maybe in the future, MFD will make a hole pattern for marker bindings, but with marker making the Duke/Baron, I don't think that will happen.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 23, 2011

Not at all. People swap liners all the time. Aftermarket liners have so many positive attributes to them that bootmakers are starting to use them in their boots as the "stock liner" most commonly seen with Intuition liners being used with Full Tilt, Dalbello, and Scarpa boots. People take Intuition liners and swap them into their Radiums, and their Black Diamond boots quite frequently, they are higher performing, better molding, and warmer than the stock liners. It is a great idea that many already implement...Go for it!

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Review flagged as pretty dumb by someone who doesn't own them. Click here to view.

Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 23, 2011

With more metal, the dukes are going to be slightly more durable over time. I know plenty of people who have similar time on snow to you and have had the barons for a couple seasons now. They are a very durable binding, especially now that Marker has worked out the kinks. You really can't go wrong with either. If something does go wrong though, Marker has a great warranty program.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 23, 2011

If you're looking for a one ski quiver, I would recommend the Hardside over the Sideshow. It is almost identical in every regard but has a slightly wider footprint making it better in variable snow and in powder. The Sideshow is a great ski and super versatile. But if you only want to have one ski, I would go slightly wider to make sure that you have better floatation in the pow, and better stability in variable conditions.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 23, 2011

The F10 has had some serious durability issues that reared their ugly head last season. There have been a whole slew of bindings that have had broken toe pieces. Marker has a great warranty program, but that doesn't help you when you are on the mountain or on vacation. I know someone who's toe piece broke, he sent it back, received a new pair and it broke again a short while later. The second time he sent it back, he spoke to marker and asked about durability, long story short, after that conversation the replacement pair he received was a pair of barons. The baron is slightly heavier but has much better performance and durability. For what you're looking to do with the binding, you would be much better off getting the baron.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 23, 2011

A size 22 boot works out to having a bsl of around 265. The size small Freeride Pro accomodates a 260 - 315 bsl, so it should work for you. I would check your boot and look for what the bsl. It stands for boot sole length. I would check on the sole of your boot or on the side of the heel block right before the arch in the center of the boot. You should see something stamped on the boot that says something like 265mm. It will probably be somewhere between 260mm - 270mm. As long as it is 260 or greater, you should be fine.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 23, 2011

Same ski, different graphics. Rossi shifted themes, and each ski is no longer a member of the 7 Deadly Sin Series, where each ski was emblematic of one of the seven deadly sins (S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, & S7). So to go along with the new name, there is a new graphic too. Same ski construction wise and dimensionally too. I don't know the specs of the rocker, but I doubt they would increase or decrease the rocker from last year.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 20, 2011

Don't waste your money. Those two skis are essentially the same ski with very similar dimensions and geometry. You would basically be buying two of the same ski. The Bibby is super versatile, and one of my favorite skis I've ever been on. It really can handle everything. If your skiing is a little more freestyle oriented, I would get the Bibby. The Jaguar Shark I have not skied yet, but it is a slightly stiffer, more directional, less freestyle oriented version of the Bibby. If you are more of always skiing forward, don't spin much, hard charging skier, then get the Jaguar Shark. Of course you could get both, but it would be a lot of overlap, as they are very similar skis. Choose one that bests suit your style of skiing, and then get something a little narrower in case there's a drought, or get something superfat with a funshape for the uber deep days. If you like Moment, go with the Belafonte if you want a narrower ski or the Donner Party if you want a fatter ski. Either way, I think getting BOTH the Jaguar Shark and the Bibby Pro is overlap.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 19, 2011

Basically the taller you are, the longer the ski should be. You also adjust size based on ability. It used to be that short skis were in, but with technology the way it is, and modern sidecuts, you can ski longer skis without sacrificing anything. At your height and weight if you are an advanced intermediate skier or better you should go for the largest size, the 183. If you are an intermediate, you should go for the 178. If you are a beginner go for the 173.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 19, 2011

This boot is pretty comfortable. Even thought this boot has a tight last, at 98mm it doesn't feel excessively tight. The flex is designed to be responsive but not overly stiff. For someone who's going to be ripping the groomers or just charging in general, and needs a ski to transfer energy and not feel dead, this is a great boot. I would classify it as an advanced intermediate to expert boot. If you're looking for a comfortable boot without sacrificing performance, this is a pretty good choice. Also, take a look at some of the offerings from full tilt and dalbello.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 19, 2011

Even though you're not trying to win by hundredths of a second, the base material still matters. Sintered bases are a little bit softer, but faster. Extruded bases are cheaper, more durable, but are slower. Does faster and slower matter in pow, yes. The same properties that make a base faster or slower also translate to less drag and better glide, both of which you want and will appreciate in the long run, especially with pow that is higher in water content (i.e. denser). At the end of the day, skis are skis, meant to be used and have fun on, but why not do it as fast and easily as possible.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 18, 2011

It depends on how big you are, and what type of ski you're used to skiing. For me, the 188 S7 did feel a bit short, but the megawatts felt fine in 188. Could they benefit from having a bigger size, probably, but the 188 is a great ski for what it's designed to do, and it does it pretty well. For me, the 188 seemed to work really well.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 18, 2011

I would go with the BentChetlers. They are less floppy and more versatile than the Opus. The Opus is softer and more soft snow specific. It isn't as versatile. If you like Line skis and are looking for something to do it all, try the Sir Francis Bacon. If you like Atomic, the BentChetler is a sick ski. The camber underfoot and the 19m turn radius lets you carve up the hardpack, and the rocker and wide dimensions allow awesome floatation in the pow. Another great ski to check out is the Moment Bibby Pro.

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Matthew Tabrys

Matthew Tabrys wrote an answer about on October 17, 2011

It depends on your ability, and what you're primarily riding. I know a lot of the pros ride slightly smaller skis for slopestyle and jibbing, and slightly longer skis for halfpipe. It really depends. My park skis are definitely my shortest skis in my quiver but are about forehead high on me. It boils down to preference, comfort level, and ability.

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