Matt Deen

Matt Deen

San Diego, California

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Matt's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Paddling
Snowshoeing

Matt's Bio

Avid hiker, backpacker, camper and gear connoisseur who loves to get out of the office and be outside.

Check out my blog at www.weekendroad.com

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote a review of on October 9, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I have a Wilderness Systems Tarpon 16 fishing kayak. I got this carrier because I thought it would make it easier to load by myself. The Roll Model works pretty well. It only gets 4 stars because the roller is not as useful as it could be with just a few design tweaks. Like almost all vehicles, the back window of my '08 Jeep Grand Cherokee is angled. When I bring the bow of my yak up to load it on the carrier, it hits the top of my Jeep and not the roller. If the roller extended, it would catch the bow of the yak at the outset and would avoid using the top of the car to lever the yak up onto the roller. Once the yak reaches the roller, it works great. The other components of the system work perfectly. It was great that Thule included all the straps and tie downs that you need. Those work great as well. My kayak is super secure and doesn't budge.

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote an answer about on July 21, 2013

For what it's worth, I just got back from...

For what it's worth, I just got back from a 4 day trip in the mountains near Haines, AK. The snow was super wet. Our guides counseled against softshell pants and instead highly recommended hard shell pants. While hiking/climbing, I kept the side zips wide open. Zipped them up when we quit moving. Worked really well. I couldn't have done that with the MH Quasars.

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote an answer about on July 16, 2013

An update to the conversation above...I never used the paddling gloves on the kayaking portion of my recent Haines, AK trip (it was way too warm). Instead, I used them on the mountaineering portion of the trip with great results. I recommend them for mountaineering in warm weather when the snow is super wet..

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote a review of on November 9, 2012

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've owned this bag for about 2 years now and it's holding up pretty well. I take my Canon T2i everywhere I go outdoors from backpacking in Denali to fishing in the Sierras. This bag has served me well with my basic storage needs for my camera, kit lens, spare battery, spare storage cards, remote, polarized lens, lens brush and cloth. I found the rain cover useful on many occasions, which stows at the bottom of the bag in its own little pocket. The zipper is water resistant and works well considering the rectangular design of the lid. All in all it was a good purchase for my basis needs and has protected my camera from my semi-rad adventures.

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote a review of on October 20, 2012

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I've been a loyal Capilene baselayer kind of guy for years. When I considered merino, I read about the benefit being reduced funk/stink and the disadvantage being the cost and the itchiness. I finally took the plunge last year when Patagonia.com had a big web special. The Medium is a great fit for my 5'10" 170 lbs frame. Yes, the sleeve are a bit longer, but I like it that way for good range of motion overhead and to cover the backs of my hands when cold. This is a great piece made by a great company. I still have my Capilene systems, but I rarely use them now that I have gone to merino. It is a better insulating material, dries quicker and doesn't smell like a sour raccoon at the end of a long weekend.

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote an answer about on August 26, 2012

I don't think you would be very comfortable with 3 "people" in this tent. It is roomy and you can make do in a pinch, but if your dog is going to sleep in the tent with you, I would go with the 3P. If the dog is willing to sleep outside in one of the two vestibules, it could work (although the vestibules are on the smaller side.

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote an answer about on August 24, 2012

Thanks Steve- I also found a review on NRS' website from a kayaker who lives in South East Alaska who said these gloves were good for kayaking there. I decided to purchase.

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote an answer about on August 22, 2012

It will fit in larger overhead bins such as planes used for international flights. Of course, the bins in smaller jets and commuter jets aren't big enough. However, the real issue is whether you can get this thing past security to carry on. I've had mixed results depending on the airline and the airport. I always give it a shot and then check it if I get denied.

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Matt Deen

Matt Deen wrote a review of on August 15, 2012

3 5

I've been searching for the past month or so for a pair of hard shell pants for backpacking and general mountaineering. I checked out the Patagonia Triolet, Mammut Convey, Outdoor Research Paladin and the MH Quasar. I ultimately decided on the Outdoor Research Paladin. I felt like they have the best combination of features, durability and weight.

I liked how lightweight the Quasar were, but I thought the inner gaiter was worthless. No pockets didn't seem practical. The 15D material did not inspire confidence with respect to durability. Most importantly to me, the fact that you can't vent the pants using the full side zips (without them falling down), seemed like a bad design to save 1 or 2 ounces of weight. Perhaps, the DryQ material is so breathable that you don't even need to vent, but I didn't have a chance to test.

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