Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance

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Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance wrote a review of on May 9, 2013

Millet Miage in Climbing Magazine
5 5

Climbing Magazine, May 2013
What makes a pant superior isn’t just about what it does do, but also about what it doesn’t do. It shouldn’t hinder upward progress; be too tight or too baggy; make you sweat or itch; look unstylish; have too many or too few pocket; or interact poorly with your harness and other gear. From the Alps of Switzerland to Boulder Canyon and Rocky Mountain National Park of Colorado, the Miage didn’t do any of those things, acting as a perfect all-around pant. Rugged, two-way-stretch Scholler One fabric looked new after six months of abrasion, and it shed graupel and light drizzles up high in Switzerland. “These bottoms rock for the articulated knees, which are ‘pre-bent’ for an active fit – they didn’t ride up or get caught when I high-stepped,” our traveling tester said. “Plus, the six-inch vents on each thigh open up so you don’t get swampy on sweaty approaches.”

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Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance wrote a review of on April 26, 2012

Climbing Magazine's review on Millet Yalla/Myo
5 5

The following review was in Climbing Magazine's May 2012 issue: I manhandle brand-new rock shoes before wearing them: Caress, squeeze, and even smell ‘em. When I first groped the high performance lace-up called the Millet Yalla (or the Myo, for those who prefer velcro), I balked at their downturned yet very stiff toe-two characteristics rarely seen in the same toe box. I was skeptical. But once I started climbing, I was amazed at how well the stiff-but-grabby combo worked. On vertical faces, I stood on tiny edges with confidence; on steeper-than-45 degree terrain, I could grab and hook features almost as well as if I were wearing a slipper. The rigid forefoot broke in after just a few pitches, softening just enough to offer both support and sensitivity. And for me and my wide, hairy feet, they fit perfectly: tight yet comfortable. The synthetic upper – lined only in the toebox – feels like soft leather, yet holds its shape over time. The Yalla/Myo is one of the few bouldering and sport climbing shoes that truly masters a wide variety of climbing styles

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Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance wrote a review of on April 26, 2012

Lafuma GR 20 in Backpacker’s April 2012 Gear Guide
5 5

Backpacker’s review on the Lafuma GR20, in April’s 2012 Gear Guide - Bargain alert: “The performance far exceeded my expectations,” said one tester after using it in Great Sand Dunes National Park. “The (proprietary) synthetic bag lofts well, kept me warm with lows in the 20s, and still packs down to two-liter bottle size.”

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Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance wrote a review of on April 26, 2012

Lafuma GR 20 in Backpacker’s April 2012 Gear Guide
5 5

Backpacker’s review on the Lafuma GR20, in April’s 2012 Gear Guide - Bargain alert: “The performance far exceeded my expectations,” said one tester after using it in Great Sand Dunes National Park. “The (proprietary) synthetic bag lofts well, kept me warm with lows in the 20s, and still packs down to two-liter bottle size.”

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Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance wrote a review of on April 26, 2012

Millet Miage Selected for Backpacker's Gear Guide
5 5

From Backpacker Magazine’s April 2012 Gear Guide: Got a bulky pile of gear for a week on the trail? With plenty of capacity for longer trips – thanks to a capacious floating lid, gusseted side pockets, and expandable storm collar – this stable, comfortable top-loader can carry it all. The plushly padded back panel and cushioned lumbar pad subdue loads up to 50 pounds, and the suspension adjusts to fit 17-21 inch torsos.

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Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance wrote a review of on April 26, 2012

Millet Miage Selected for Backpacker's Gear Guide
5 5

From Backpacker Magazine’s April 2012 Gear Guide: Got a bulky pile of gear for a week on the trail? With plenty of capacity for longer trips – thanks to a capacious floating lid, gusseted side pockets, and expandable storm collar – this stable, comfortable top-loader can carry it all. The plushly padded back panel and cushioned lumbar pad subdue loads up to 50 pounds, and the suspension adjusts to fit 17-21 inch torsos.

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Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance wrote a review of on February 9, 2012

Climbing Magazine's review on Hook Pant
5 5

Check out Climbing Magazine's review on the Millet Hook Pant: "You will likely be mistaken for a European when you're onsighting in these pants - patch-heavy crag pants are standard issue from Spain to Slovenia. Although you might not achieve the sending power of Maja Vidmar or Adam Ondra, the techy features will have you raving. The Hook is made from quick-dry softshell nylon spandex and has excellent abrasion resistance throughout, including in the articulated knees. Contrasting extra-breathable, two-way-stretch, quick-dry nylon elastane panels are strategically placed in the crotch, outer legs, across the rear, and behind the knees for full freedom of movement. The cinchable elastic waistband is covered with a soft, next-to-skin microfiber. And angled side pocket on the left thigh is sized for small items like wallet and keys. Testers praised the built-in chalk bag loop, but a fake fly was the object of ridicule.

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Maro LaBlance

Maro LaBlance wrote a review of on February 9, 2012

Urban Climbing Review on Millet Friction
5 5

Check out Urban Climbing's review on the Millet Friction in the Feb/March 2012 issue: Another great all-arounder was the MILLET FRICTION, which proved its worth from Rumney, New Hampshire, to the Red River Gorge, Kentucky, and back to Durango, Colorado. The Frictions provided excellent protection from scree and uneven terrain, thanks to a tight lace system and stiff sole. They also had outstanding torsional stiffness and inner-shoe cushion for off-trail use. Caveat: our tester felt these shoes had little arch support, so high-arched people should be wary. Also, the leather tended to stretch out, so keep that in mind for sizing. Excelling on scree and slab, the Vibram sole had almost perfect friction on everything from granite to sandstone. They also stood above the crowd for their durability, as our tester had no issues after almost four months of heavy use. Our tester said, “I’d choose these shoes over most because of their beefy buy low-profile design and good looks.”

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