Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle

WA: Alpental, Stevens Pass; BC: Red Mtn, Monashee Powder; ID: Schweitzer, Silver Mtn; VT: Sugarbush (former home mtn)

Mark from Seattle's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Snowshoeing
Skiing

Mark from Seattle's Bio

I am an avid tele skier and a gear geek. I am a product manager, so features / functions / specs come naturally. I love talking about this stuff.

6', 200#, very athletic, avid Crossfit athlete. I have been a serious road and mtn cyclist since '85.

Ski Quiver:

- K2 Work Stinx w/ BD 01 binding (touring setup)
- Line Prophet 100 w/ Hammerhead adapter plate
- Armada JJ w/ Hammerhead adapter plate
- Line Prophet 130 w/ Hammerhead adapter plate

NOTE: The Hammerhead adapter plates are great if you need to swap bindings among multiple skis. It requires a 5mm T-handle Hex wrench and 5 minutes.

Scarpa T1 (replaced Garmont Ener-G's)

Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a review of on March 7, 2012

5 5

I purchased the Influence 115s to replace a pair of Armada JJs that I really did not like. I am a tele skier and found the JJs to be too poppy (I like a lively ski, but the JJs are poppy in a disconcerting way), and the rather extreme tail rocker does not provide enough back-foot support.

I already owned two other Line skis: the Prophet 100 and the 130. The Influence 115 has replaced the 100s as my go-to ski. The 115 has incredible edge hold when the Pac NW snow gets packed out, and incredible float when the snow is deep. They blast thru crud like none other, and are surprisingly quick edge-to-edge in bumps. And unlike other fat skis, they do not chatter at high speed: AT ALL!

I disagree with the comments that these skis need to be driven hard: today I practiced skiing on one foot, and I was able to control them with no problem (on tele gear, mind you). They are heavy, but they ski much smaller than their size.

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Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a review of on October 23, 2011

3 5

First off I am a tele skier, so my feedback is a bit specific, but I have skied it in both alpine and tele turns, and I am a certified instructor. It is a very "poppy" ski, which can be fun, or it can be terrifying, depending on the snow conditions. I would not recommend this as a one-ski quiver: it is squirrelly on groomed, and downright unpleasant on hardpack. You can never relax on these skis, because the uber-tight sidecut makes them very prone to edge-catching, especially on long, fast cat-tracks.

They are definitely NOT good for skinning: the dual-rocker reduces the effective surface area of the ski, so it can be hard to get traction. They are also not good for stomping landings: they sink in more than a conventional ski.

As far as tele skiing is concerned, the reduced surface area creates similar issues when you need to put extra weight on your back foot: it just seems to "fade" away. Very unforgiving.

For powder skiing, I strongly prefer my Line Prophet 130's: they are just as quick in trees and they have more flotation.

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Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a review of on January 29, 2011

4 5

22Designs used to sell mounting plates for skis with inserts (K2) and as a spare ski kit so you could easily swap your bindings among your quiver. They kind of dropped the ball with the Axls: although the mounting pattern is the same, the Hammerhead screws won't work.

If you want to use your Axls with the mounting plates, you will need a very specialized screw, which I found after quite a bit of digging:

Industrial Depot
678-904-5000; you have to call to place the order as the part is not on their website.
Item#: 999604
M6-1.0 x 8mm Low Head Socket Cap Screw A2 S/S (stainless)

$1.06/screw x 16 screws = $16.96. Shipping and handling was an exorbitant $18.

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Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a review of on January 29, 2011

4 5

22Designs used to sell mounting plates for skis with inserts (K2) and as a spare ski kit so you could easily swap your bindings among your quiver. They kind of dropped the ball with the Axls: although the mounting pattern is the same, the Hammerhead screws won't work.

If you want to use your Axls with the mounting plates, you will need a very specialized screw, which I found after quite a bit of digging:

Industrial Depot
678-904-5000; you have to call to place the order as the part is not on their website.
Item#: 999604
M6-1.0 x 8mm Low Head Socket Cap Screw A2 S/S (stainless)

$1.06/screw x 16 screws = $16.96. Shipping and handling was an exorbitant $18.

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Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a review of on January 25, 2010

2 5

My current boots are '09 Ener-G's, which replaced '05 Ener-G's. The '05's were great for a couple of years: I love the progressive flex. However, the third yr, when I pressured the front of the boot, the instep would bow outward, and I would lose contact with the boot. So, I purchased the '09's, which supposedly had a better plastic. The 09's gave out after about 20 days: the shell just bows outward when I pressure the tongue.

So, I was pretty excited to try the Voodoo's, because I figured the new overlap cuff design might solve that problem. Like I said, there's a lot to like about the Ener-G's. Last night I tried on the Voodoos, and the same flex problem occurred as soon as I put them on. Actually, I had my Ener-G's on one foot and the Voodoo on the other. The bootfitter agreed: both the Ener-G and the Voodoo have the same problem, where pressuring the front of the boot causes the shell to bow outward across the instep.

The only positive comment is that the new buckles are an improvement over the Ener-g.

So, no Voodoos for me...

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Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a review of on January 4, 2010

5 5

Skier: Expert tele skier, 6' 210#, very athletic build.
Rig: 186 cm with Hammerheads set on #5 and installed 4 cm ahead of chord center, Garmont Ener-G's.

I skied them at Schweitzer, ID over New Years. Thurs was the perfect day to try them out: a mixture of deep crud, untracked snow and some hardpacked groomers. They carve surprisingly well on the groomers, even at super-hi speeds. Unstoppable in crud and deep snow, and VERY quick turning in tight trees. They required zero technique adjustment on my part: very intuitive. They go where you point them, with no need to worry about the texture of the snow. You can throw a turn wherever and whenever you need.

Other skis in my quiver include Line Prophet 100 and 130 and K2 Work Stinx. The JJ will be my ski of choice except when conditions are really firm.

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Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a review of on November 11, 2009

4 5

There were lots of comments earlier here about 'core center' vs. 'chord center'. Chalk that up to poor listening skills. (And slap the ski product manager who printed 'core center' on his skis...that's just lame.) The proper term is 'chord center', which is the balance point of a ski if you were to balance it end-to-end on a knife edge - without bindingsChord center is mainly a tele setup term. In the 'ole days, it was where the pins of a tele boot were mounted. Nowadays, chord center is just a point of reference: NObody mounts tele bindings at chord center anymore.For alpine skiers, you can easily equate tele boot pin location to your mid-boot measurement. Tele pins are located on the duckbill at the front of the boo: measure from your middle-boot line to approx 1/2 cm ahead of the front of the boot toe box.For skis that are ~ 90mm midfoot, you should mount tele bindings at least 3 cm ahead of chord center. The resulting more centered stance makes turning much quicker. I describe the difference as feeling 'on top of your skis' as opposed to 'steering' your skis, and it still leaves plenty of float up front.My main skis are 183cm, 100mm mid-foot Line Prophets, mounted 4 cm ahead of chord center. They work very well in Pacific NW deep, heavy snow, to tight, VT icy bump runs. If you ski in the park, you should consider mounting them 6+ cm ahead of chord center.You can gain a lot more versatility by purchasing binding plates such as the Hammerhead and Rottefella NTN mounting plates. These are thin (~2-3 mm thick) metal plates that get screwed to your ski. They offer at least 2 different fore/aft mounting positions: use the forward position for in-bounds/sidecountry skiing, and switch to the rear position for deep snow. The beauty of the mounting plates is that you can quickly swap the binding position: the plate remains mounted to the ski, but provides multiple fore/aft binding holes.You owe it to yourself to experiment with mounting position.I also have a pair of Line Prophet 130s for deep snow conditions that are mounted 2.5 cm ahead of chord center.I swear I am not a shill for Line Skis, but I have to say they are fantastic skis...

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Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a question about on October 6, 2009

T1 or T-Race? I am an expert level tele skier, 6' 210#, and ski in the Pacific NW mainly on Line Prophet 100s, but I also ski the Prophet 130s when the going gets really deep. I am mainly a resort and side-country skier, but I go cat skiing every year, and this yr my buddies finally have their act together and we will be doing some touring.

I have been on Garmont Ener-G's for the last 2 pairs of boots. Last yr's model gave out mid-season - they bulge out at the instep when I put pressure on the tongue. I have had the liners re-formed, but it has not helped.

I am leaning toward the T1's because they seem to be more versatile. Any comments?

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Mark from Seattle

Mark from Seattle wrote a review of on September 28, 2009

5 5

I am a 6' 210 very advanced tele skier in WA. This ski rocks! (I have it in the 186 length) Don't let the 100mm underfoot scare you. The 17m radius rails hardpack; if it's icy I usually go with my 84mm Work Stinx, but I have skied the 100s on some of the iciest VT conditions ever. And, oddly enough, I hooked up w/ a local VT tele'er who was on the then-identical Karhus, and he was raving about his skis for all-around VT skiing.I have them mounted w/ Hammerhead bindings set 3cm ahead of chord center, and I don't have any problems with tip dive. These are great all-around skis. I am a very good bump skier, and these skis rock the bumps. I don't do much switch riding because it's kinda scary on tele's, and I am not a big park person.They devour WA crud. I loved them so much I bought the 130s for cat-skiing and big dump days. I agree with the comments that the top sheet could be tougher. I have taken a few chunks out of the top edge but nothing that impairs or endangers the ski.So, if I can rail these skis using tele gear, you alpine folks should have no problems at all.

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