Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti

Bozeman Montana and the surrounding areas!

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Lyric's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Snowboarding
Climbing

Lyric's Bio

I'm a recent graduate from the Mechanical Engineering undergrad program at Montana State University, returned to school again this fall for a Masters Degree.

I grew up in Minnesota where we went camping and canoeing. I've been a skier, but I have been snowboarding for the last 8 years or so, and since I've been in Montana, I've gotten in to climbing.

Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on September 15, 2010

That is a question that is highly debatable. It is mostly agreed that wiregates are easier to clip, and don't exhibit gate slap. FYI, gate slap happens when you hit the back of the rope 'biner on your hand or a wall and the mass of the solid gate makes the gate itself open up, wires have less mass and it is nearly impossible to reproduce this under normal falling conditions.

However, solid and bent gates are stronger overall, and I don't really think much harder to clip under most circumstances. I have a mix of both wire and solid gate biners on my rack.

Wire gate biners are also supposed to be better for ice climbers because you can get them open easier if they freeze. I'm not an ice climber and therefore cannot independently confirm that, but it makes sense to me as an engineer.

Hope that helped, Climb On.

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on September 15, 2010

Do you mean the breaking stress? Strain is defined at change in length divided by the original length. Stress is Force divided by area. However, most climbing gear is simply rated by force required to fail it, with a safety factor. Meaning they do away with the known value of area for the end users.

On the lower left of this PDF, you will see a small little diagram that says 15kN. That seems to be the best I can find for you.

http://www.petzl.com/files/all/technical-notice/Sport/C.%20HARNAIS%20ESC%20C00500-D.pdf

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on September 11, 2010

First off, I am assuming you mean you want to top your mast, and not just hang over for balast. So, you should pick up two of these, one right handed, and one left handed. You will also need a harness, two slings, or one sling and a foot loop. You will also need carabiners to attach those things to the Ascender.

Some people would leave it at that, and trust that the Ascender is enough to keep you in place at the top, and in all likely hood, it will. I think that most people would want some kind of other back up system at the top. What does the top of your mast look like, is there anything else to tie off to? What size boat is it?
Foot Loop: http://www.backcountry.com/petzl-footape-adjustable-foot-loop

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on August 31, 2010

Haul Loop: 12kN-rated.
However, still exercise caution when using it for anything where a life is at stake. The haul loop is meant for hauling, even when it is rated at 12kN.

Outside of hauling purposes, I would be sketch about doing anything much more than rappelling with this loop, and I would still run a sling around my body to the loops in the front as a back up. I would NOT belay or fall from the haul loop.

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on July 18, 2010

Nate,
You pose a difficult question since you are considering two awesome packs. I am an Atmos 65 Owner, and I can understand why you would worry. However, I think I have learned how to pack better, and bring less non-essential things since I have owned the Atmos 65. That said, I think if you have any doubts that you want more room, upgrade. Also, compression sacks are great for clothes and tents no matter what pack you choose.

Cheers

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on July 16, 2010

Tena,

I have two sets of Oakley shades. On the Montefrio's the stems (bows) are fixed in place with a typical hinge assembly. However, the Half Jacket's bow's are indeed able to pop off of the frame, as you say keeping them safe. This has absolutely kept my Half Jackets safe on multiple occasions. I have opened the bag that they are in to find five pieces (Frame, lenses, and bows). However, I would never claim "unbreakable". The lenses are quite destructible, and you can most definitely break the bows if you really wanted to.

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on July 14, 2010

"Joint collaboration with Wild Country to standardise colour recognition (DMM make the light weight, coloured Rocks for Wild Country)." As cited from http://www.dmmclimbing.com/productsDetails.asp?pid=5&pid2=11

So, that said,

Here are the size charts for the Wild Country Rocks: http://www.wildcountry.co.uk/Products/PassivePro/Rocks/

Climb On.

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on July 4, 2010

Tami, the thing about most compression bags is that you can buy them big and, not to sound obvious, compress them down. So that means that you can buy big and be good. For these granite bags, I suppose the 22L bag would be plenty big enough for your sleeping bag. Be sure to check out the other compression sacks to make sure you find one that sounds like exactly what you want.

Cheers

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on July 1, 2010

According to Coleman:

"To Charge Battery:

When the battery is fully discharged, it will take 10 to 12 hours (on average), but may take up to 16 to 18 hours, to fully recharge it. To obtain maximum performance, charge for 18 hours for the first three cycles. Always charge the battery immediately after use whenever possible. Charge indoors using a household source."

So it sounds to me like you must charge it the first three or so times with the 120-volt adapter on a household plug, and for quite a long time. So, I don't know if you are doing those things, but they also note that "a small light located on the body, next to the adapter cord hole, will glow when the charger is connected correctly. If the light is not on, the blender is not being charged." So you should check for that.

Sometimes devices like this with built in batteries, the factory will put in little plastic tabs that separate the contact and the battery for shipping and initial storing. Look for something like that perhaps. Let us know what the solution was if you find it.

Good luck tracing the problem down.

For reference, you can find a copy of the owners manual here:
http://search.coleman.com/cgi-bin/MsmGo.exe?grab_id=0&page_id=6750&query=blender

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on July 1, 2010

I own 4 other Garmin devices and I can tell you, they make the absolute best GPS gear on the planet. I checked out a few other review sites and this is a fairly highly regarded. I also read that you should definitely update the firmware and maps from Garmin.

Bottom line, this unit is waterproof and will get you where you need to go. Sounds like a win to me. No need to spend more money in my opinion.

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on July 1, 2010

~65L or so is a good size, I would absolutely get a couple compression bags for the trip too. Most importantly, don't over pack. Gear junkies want to bring something for every possible occasion. Try to keep it simple, you don't need a new shirt for every day, and you certainly don't need that many pants.

That said, for my money, I would spend a few more bucks and go with the Osprey Kestrel that is on sale this week: http://www.backcountry.com/outdoorgear/Osprey-Packs-Kestrel-68-Backpack-4000-4200cu-in/OSP0185M.html

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Lyric Rosatti

Lyric Rosatti wrote an answer about on June 27, 2010

Thanks for the great follow up guys. Another solution here is instant coffee. It may not be the world best cup of coffee, but I find that french presses in general don't make the best cup either.

If nothing else here, I think you can safely say that coffee is an open-ended discussion here, and that there are many options available to you. I would take the time to research all the options for what fits your current gear best.

Cheers

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