Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA

    New Feature

    Browse Your Followers or See Who You're Following

  • #12045of 19798

Lynn's Passions

Snowboarding
Paddling

Lynn's Bio

0 Comments

0 Answers

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote a review of on May 11, 2012

5 5

I've never worn compression tights until this purchase. To be honest, it took an act of god (perhaps the running god?) to get into them. There are instructions on the package stating how to put them on, but quite frankly, the scene in the house was like something out of a Saturday Night Live skit. Anyway, I am 5'2", 125 lbs, cycled for years, enjoyed microbrews for years (with no cycling), and consequently have fairly thick legs. Based on the opinions here, I bought a medium and am happy that I did. They were a tad binding around the back of the knees, but I have to admit, they felt good while running and my knees felt better when done. They were a little long for me, but hobbitses aren't known for their fairy-like legs. I'll defintely be purchasing another pair.

(3)

 

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote a review of on May 10, 2012

3 5

But the sizing is off. The armpits are very tight - they bind and pinch. I normally wear a US 6 or 8 so ordered up a size. While the torso itself was an "athletic fit", the armpits were way too tight. Bummer there aren't any other larger sizes. I loved the weight and my husband has a Montane jacekt he swears by.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote a review of on January 22, 2011

5 5

I absolutely love these socks. I used to be a Smartwool fan, but Icebreaker has moved in as the new favorite. They are more durable and do OK with a very light dry cycle (though I normally hang them). I don't recommend putting wool anything in the dryer.

Time to order more. I've been alternating between these and the Carhart wool socks. These breath a bit better.

(1)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote an answer about on August 13, 2009

Update: I ended up using the tent on a 10-day kayaking expedition in Alaska.

We got "galed" in for 7 of those days with 35-40 knot winds The tent held up well, and it stayed dry other than condensation.

I would like to see better ventilation in future models, perhaps a "sliding door" on the back side to allow for more airflow. A friend on the trip had an Exped Vela 1 tent which allowed him to get more air into the tent, but did not give the same amount of vestibule space or the ability to heat hot water in the vestibule.

Overall, I love the tent. Light. Easy to set up and tear down. More than enough room for me (I'm 5'3" and 124 lbs, so there was plenty of room above my head to stash things). Factory sealed seams.

(0)

 

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote a question about on June 1, 2009

I recently purchased the Hubba HP tent. It set up faster than any tent I've had, but when I took it to Scotland for the TGO Challenge (west to east coast hike), forecasts were for 90mph wind gusts the first night (I stayed in a B&B and wimped out). The second night, when I couldn't procrastinate any more, I borrowed a Hilleberg AKTO tent which held up fabulously. I don't think the MSR Hubba BP could have taken 70mph gusts, driving rain, and sleet. It rained 9 of the 13 days. Anyone know if an MSR Hubba could take those 70mph gusts? I didn't chance it... I went with the most popular choice of those crazy Scots............

(0)

 

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote a review of on April 6, 2009

5 5

I've been wearing Smartwool socks for 5 years now and absolutely love them. They are incredibly soft, but one bit of advice: Do not ever put them in the dryer. You can probably get away with a no-heat cycle, but if you're husband helps with the wash occasionally, as mine does, and likes the power dry setting, Smartwool socks will lose their silky, no-blister properties. Let them hang dry and you'll be surprised at how much longer they last (and stay nice). Same applies for most clothes (and it's probably better for your electric bill and the environment).

One person mentioned quality. I have had over 25 pairs of SW socks in the last 5 years. One pair I bought had a mfg. defect in the toe and it fell apart the first wearing. Those had been purchased at a local shop on Orcas Island and the store owner replaced them immediately. Occasionally, stuff happens, but, overall, I'd say these are a 5* product.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote a review of on April 6, 2009

4 5

Be careful when you unpack this bed from the shipping box. If you slice through the tape with a utility knife, you'll probably knick the bed like I did (not smart since the box said not to open with a knife). Good news is the nylon part of the bed patches quite nicely with a tent or nylon jacket repair kit.

As for be bed, I ordered the large size and it is huge (the handle is great). One of my dogs likes it. The other one isn't so sure as air does get trapped in the bed to some extent and "exhales" as the dog steps on it to lie down. A whimpy dog might find it unsettling.

The one improvement I'd make is to have a 3" layer of firmer foam as the base layer covered with 3" of the outdoor polyfill baffling.

Cost-wise, you can't make these beds for the 20% off price at Back Country. The fiberfill alone (which is the type that is used in outdoor furniture that can be hosed/washed and does not hold odors) would cost about $70 retail.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote a review of on June 18, 2008

5 5

I own a 205cm straight-shaft Shuna and my husband has a 210 bent-shaft Ikelos. Until this past week when I spent 4-7 hours each day on the water in Alaska, I had primarily used my Shuna and didn't much care for the Ikelos bent shaft. I liked the power it gave me, but had problems with my braces and strokes due to the design (bent). However, after my week in Alaska, I'm totally sold on the Ikelos. I was in a single, plastic, rotomold Necky Eskia kayak (16 ft) trying to keep up with three fiberglass, Skookumchuk kayaks. The Ikelos gave me the maximum power I needed to (almost) keep up with the rest of the group. The bent shaft saved my forearms from certain doom. Last year I did a similar trip with a huge 230cm aquabound plastic/metal paddle. Never again. The Shuna is a great entry level paddle, but I'll take the Ikelos over it any day. I also tried a friend's 220cm bent shaft Werner Athenos. The Athenoswas easier on my shoulders (I'm 5'2" and 122 lbs), but it didn't kick butt like the Ikelos. The only thing that would have been nicer is a smaller shaft diameter (I wear a size XS or S paddling glove).

(0)

 

0 Comments

Lynn from Redmond, WA

Lynn from Redmond, WA wrote a review of on September 13, 2006

5 5

I absolutely love these shirts. Recently they went on an around-the-world trip mountain biking in Normandy, France, jungle hiking in Malaysia, and on safari in South Africa. I packed two Mountain Hardwear Technical T's, one brooks wicking shirt, and one North face shirt. All protected me from the sun (and bugs to the extent that they provided good coverage), but the Mountain Hardwear blew away the other two in terms of wicking ability and the fact that they could be rinsed in a sink at night (with Dr. Brommers) and be dry the next morning. The Mountain Hardwear tops also pack smaller than any other shirt I have. My only caveat with the Mountain Hardwear tech T's is that they snag easily. My husband has single-handedly added "interest" to both shirts by tossing his biking gloves (with VELCRO®-Brand fasteners) closures into the laundry with my stuff. I wish the tops were a bit more durable (in terms of pull), but would not sacrifice the fast-drying properties to attain that.

(1)

 

0 Comments