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Luke Russell

Luke Russell

Madison, WI

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote a question about on May 21, 2011

How does this pullover differ from the torrentshell jacket?

Ok, sorry to ask so many questions at once, but I have this many... I noticed that the cuffs appear to be elastic rather than velcro on the pullover, and the pocket(s)?? are internal rather than external.
1) Are there 2 internal pockets in this pullover, or just one?
2) How does this pullover stow away? is it into one of the internal pockets?
3) Does it really have the elastic cuffs as depicted or is that from a previous year?
4) Are there hood cinch-ers like on the torrentshell jacket or not?
5) Is the sizing similar or is this one a little slimmer than the torrentshell jacket (it seems slimmer from the pictures).

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am very tall and thin, and fit a medium-sized R1 fleece pullover very well (6'4", 170lb) I hate baggy clothing, so am disinclined to go for a large, but have unfortunately long arms. Also leaving on a trip in 2 weeks, so a quick response (if possible) would b gr8.

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote a review of on February 28, 2011

Cho Oyu - best jacket I can possibly imagine
5 5

The Cho Oyu was mammut's version of this jacket a few seasons ago, and I can't say enough wonderful things about it. c_change really works, and I don't think I'll ever try another GTX jacket after having bought my c_change. I use this skiing in the rockies and in downpours during the summer in the midwest, and I love it for both. It blocks the cold wind in Breck mid-january, and breathes on a hot day in the summer, I seriously think this jacket can be worn in nearly every condition that you'd ever need a jacket for. Not only that, but this thing has held up to the toughest scrapes - the material is very durable. I hit a couple of trees on some dd steeps at park city last year and there were no tears or scratches in the material. This jacket tops them all and then some, and if I ever come across a better jacket, I'll have to edit this post.

As far as fit, I'm 6'4, 175, and wear a large. It fits very well. The jacket was designed for ice climbing, not skiing, so it has less excess fabric under the arms than some other, baggier-fit skiing jackets. I really like that feature, and think I'll look for ice climbing jackets for all my future jackets - the fit just seems more appropriate. I also have room for a few layers underneath, but if I wear a hoody with this jacket, the hood can get bundled by the large size of the jacket's neckpiece.

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote a review of on February 10, 2011

5 5

these gloves are snug and warm.. I bought them to address my serious problem with cold hands. I also come from MN, and have to say that 20F is a piece of cake for these puppies - I have to make sure I slide them on before I head out, but the only issue I've ever had with them is in temps closer to -10F, when your nose hairs form icicles and break off. My thumbs get pretty cold in the gloves in those temps, and I have to swing my arms around to get some blood down to my fingers and keep the thumbs in with my palms. 20F, though, and my hands are sweating in there. ** you have to do the cinchy thing though, so no wind gets down in there! I use these for commuting and for rigorous mountain days out on the slopes. They're tough and toasty.

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote a review of on February 10, 2011

5 5

I'm 6'4, and I don't curl up in bed, I like to stretch out, and still have a little room at the foot and head of the bed so I'm not touching the storm windows. This tent allows that kind of sprawling action. Not super light, but not super expensive, either, and super high quality. Good buy, good length.

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote a review of on February 10, 2011

4 5

I'm gonna have to disagree with the warm in the wind comment, it's wind resistant, but if you live in a windy place, and live there during the winter, this should not be your outer layer. Maybe in the fall though, and if it's not too windy, it's outrageously warm.. outrageously. So outrageously that I was sweating after the first 5 minutes wearing it indoors. It also looks really cool. As cool as it is, though, I think a half-zip hooded or hoodless pullover would be more practical for the targeted "recommended uses". I also wouldn't call it a mountaineering top - the pockets are right where your backpack straps would go, lol. Overall sick looking top, a little impractical, very warm and fleecy.

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote a review of on February 10, 2011

4 5

These vises are a great traveling wax bench if you need to do wax work at home or on the road, but they're a little clunky, and pretty thin at center. They work really well for me, and hold my skis solidly during those hard scrapings - the rubber grips are a lot tougher (and grippier) than they look (huge pro right there). My skis are only 66mm at center, though, and if you have some seriously wide powder skis, this may not be your dream vise. I have the model pictured in the guru snapshot, they rock, but I'm pretty sure he's right about the 85mm waist (not 110)

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote an answer about on February 10, 2011

No, these will not work for nordics. You will need a ski profile to properly support your skis for the rigorous scraping and brushing required for multiple coats - Swix and Toko both make profiles and even separate waxing benches for nordic. The trouble with some of the profiles, though, is that you need a swix wax bench to fit the inserts into. This year, though, both Toko and Swix came out with a set of vice profiles that work pretty well - not as good as a full ski profile, but none the less, a cheaper and more portable option. Unfortunately, neither is shown on the company's respective websites, but trust me - they exist. Swix's product is # T0785 ($120)

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote an answer about on February 10, 2011

If that's not the answer you're looking for, there are 2 common types of wax application - drip waxing and chalking. A third (hot boxing) requires extra equipment, but can be useful if you have the time for it.

Drip waxing you hold the iron above your ski base and melt wax onto the iron and let it drip down onto your bases, then iron in the drips, not letting the wax stay molten for more than 5 seconds after passing your iron over it.

Chalking I described in the above post.

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Luke Russell

Luke Russell wrote an answer about on February 9, 2011

No way, that's some expensive equipment, man! Depending upon what kind of skis (downhill or nordic) that you're using, you will want to apply a few coats of a soft wax (more if you're waxing nordic), that you scrape off thoroughly before each new application. If it's the first wax the skis have ever seen, you want to make certain that the bases aren't cold - if they're warm, they'll accept wax better, but too hot and you might burn them. Follow up your warm wax coats with whatever temperature range you're interested in - these don't have to be thick coats anymore, you can just chalk the wax on (heat the iron and rub the wax on the iron to melt it a little, then wipe your wax bar across the base - it looks like chalk if you do it right) and iron it in, then scrape it off. A lot of people say that when they first wax their nordics, they like to throw down at least 6 coats.

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