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Laura Fremgen

Laura Fremgen

Taos, New Mexico

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Laura T's Passions

Fly Fishing
Hiking & Camping
Snowboarding
Running
Climbing

Laura T's Bio

I've lived and travelled all over the west, residing in Taos for now. Wildland firefighter in the summer, lifty in the winter.

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Laura Fremgen

Laura Fremgen wrote a review of on October 3, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
Fit: True to size

Thank you to Backcountry.com and The North Face for hand-selecting me to review this piece of gear for the benefit of the Backcountry.com community.

I tested this jacket out by wearing it while I hiked Wheeler Peak, the highest point in New Mexico.

I got it in a size medium, which is the size that I usually wear in TNF products and in other brands as well. The North Face website does have a little tool that helps you figure out what size you should wear in any given piece of clothing; it was recommended that I wear a small, but I guess I just prefer a slightly looser fit (Also, I have a 36 chest, so by the size chart I would be a medium). It felt good in the torso; it wasn't too tight or loose. It was tighter than usual in the arms/wrists though, which I liked since I used the thumb loops quite a bit. I had the same problem with this garment as I do with all women's TNF products, too much extra fabric around the waist.

I wouldn't exactly describe this garment as cozy, but it wasn't necessarily uncomfortable either. The fabric just felt like more of a soft shell-type of material, as opposed to cotton or a soft fleece. However, it did not have any of the water-repellency or resistance like a soft shell typically does. I wore it in a light rain and it totally soaked up the water like cotton would, though it did dry much quicker.

I wore it over a merino baselayer when I did my hike, and I found that combination to keep me at a very comfortable temperature as I hiked, even with temperatures in the 30s; it was both breathable and warm. On the descent though, I had to add two more layers to stay warm enough as the wind howled. (continued below...)

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Laura Fremgen

Laura Fremgen wrote an answer about on September 28, 2014

I'd recommend looking into tents that do not have a single-wall configuration (which is most 4-season tents). While these are really good in certain conditions, they don't sound like they would be ideal for your intended use. You will likely get condensation build-up inside the tent, which will cause you to get wet. Instead, consider a tent with a fly that can be continually re-treated with waterproof sprays to extend the life of the tent and keep you the driest. I have always been happy with MSR tents (look into the Hubba line), but Marmot, Big Agnes, and many other brands also make tents that will serve you well. If you are certain you want a 4-season though, you may also want to consider the Sierra Designs Convert 4-season tent.

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Laura Fremgen

Laura Fremgen wrote an answer about on September 22, 2014

It's designed to hold one board with bindings and one without. You should be able to fit it all in if you take the bindings off one of the boards, and stack them on the board that still has the bindings attached. Padded is definitely better and more protective of your boards, but generally a higher price tag too.

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Laura Fremgen

Laura Fremgen wrote an answer about on September 22, 2014

According to the specs, this bag could hold one board with bindings, as well as another board without bindings. So, you may need to take the bindings off one of the boards but it should be able to fit everything. You could also order the bag plenty large (like say your boards are 154s, go with the 166), and the larger bag would probably be able to fit both with bindings. At least, that has been my experience with these types of bags.

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