Kretzky

Kretzky

Anywhere there's mountains to hike up, climb up, or ski down

Kretzky's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Skiing
Climbing

Kretzky's Bio

I get anxious when I spend too much time indoors.

A backpacker in the summer, a ski patroller in the winter, but unfortunately in the office during the week year round. At least it allows me to buy a closet full of gear. It's about time I let you know what I think about that stuff.

Kretzky

Kretzky wrote a review of on April 2, 2013

4 5

I own an older version of this jacket, pre-gore tex, made of Patagonia's H2NO. I recently picked up a new version of this jacket. I loved the previous version, and it held up incredibly well skiing trees, taking out branchess, etc. I only bought the new one because I wanted a nice waterproof black jacket.

The new one is equally great, they switched to Gore-tex and it has proven plenty waterproof. They also eliminated a chest pocket, I'm still undecided about that. I like pockets, but it does clean up the look of the jacket a bit. The new fabric has also held up well to a winter of abuse. I ski a lot of tree's so lesser fabrics start to show wear pretty quickly from hitting branches. This one still looks great.

As for warmth, I usually layer a fleece under it. For really cold days (single digits or below zero) I throw a Down Sweater under it instead of a fleece.

Sizing - I'm 6' 180lbs and the Medium fits well. I would definitely say it's an athletic cut though. My only complaint is how the powder skirt hangs up sometime when I first put the jacket on. But the way it integrates with Patagonia pant's is a huge plus, so I'm willing to deal with it.

It's not quite perfect, but I'd still reccomend it. Especially if you have a pair of patagonia pants you can pair with it for skiing in deep stuff.

(0)

 

Kretzky

Kretzky wrote a review of on April 2, 2013

5 5

I'm not sure about the negative reviews, or what some of these folks where running on. I own two pairs of these shoes. I've run over 100 road miles on them, and have done 60+ miles worth of Tough Mudders in them. I always run with socks. My feet haven't been irritated, and the shoes haven't fallen apart. I can't find any flaws with this shoe, I picked them over the road version because they're lighter and "more minimalist." I haven't had any issues with this shoe. My 5K time dropped somewhat significantly my first time out on them. Having a few less ounces on your feet makes a big difference! Overall (assuming you're a barefoot style runner) I'd highly reccomend this shoe, it's been flawless for me.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Kretzky

Kretzky wrote a review of on April 2, 2013

5 5

What's not to like about this stabilizer? It weighs next to nothing, it packs inside the PCS (so it doesn't take up any room in your pack), and now I don't have to worry as much about my Jetboil tipping over. It works great with the frying pan for making omelets in the morning too! $15 is worth the peace of mind that my clumsy camp partners aren't going to knock over my jetboil, or scald their leg with boiling water. Money well spent.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Kretzky

Kretzky wrote a review of on March 10, 2011

5 5

I picked a pair of these up before ski season this year. Now that I have 3+ months in them, here's my thoughts;
I've worn them under a pair of Patagonia Powder bowl ski pants for skiing temps from 5 to 50 degF. I have not been hot or cold. Granted, when it was 50 deg and I was skiing hard I did vent my pants a bit. I was initially concerned that these might be a little too warm, but that hasn't been the case. They breathe incredibly well, and when I did get heated up, they wicked the sweat rather effectively.
The legless design is awesome, as you don't have any overlapping under your boots. The only issue being that with a 32" inseam I had to make sure that my socks were pretty long. I had one pair of ski socks that barely overlapped with these and about midday I could feel a cool spot on my shins where the socks and pants were no longer covering. This was easily remedied by not using those socks anymore.
Everyone knows merino wool is king of the funk (if you don't know, now you know). So after multiple days of skiing in these, they still didn't stink, it's awesome. You can go on a ski trip and only pack one pair of long johns/base layers. Not to mention my ski buddies were jealous of the sweet 3/4 length cause they had that classic bunching/overlap of sock and pant in their ski boots.
$75 is a lot of coin to spend on a pair of base layer pants, but I think these pants are worth every penny of it. You could buy 2 synthetics for the price of this pair - but then again, you'd actually NEED to buy two if you're going on a multiday ski trip.

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

Kretzky

Kretzky wrote a review of on December 16, 2009

5 5

Another classic ski flick from MSP. Lots of awesome skiing, crazy tricks, and innovative camera angles, but none of that matters.

This should be required viewing for anyone who truely loves skiing, and that has nothing to do with the first 58 minutes of this movie. It has everything to do with the last 15 minutes and the outstanding tribute to Shane, his life, his legacy, and the undeniable impact he has had on the sport of skiing. One of the true pioneers of our sport over the past decade, it's a sin not to watch this and pay tribute to him. If watching the tribute to Shane doesn't bring a tear to your eye, you must have pure icewater running through you viens.

I agree with everything Steven G had to say in his review.
RIP Shane.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Kretzky

Kretzky wrote a question about on December 8, 2009

The review says it easily fits 4 sleepers, but I'm always weary of that. So has anybody slept in this with 4 full size adults? We're 6'3", 6', 5'11", 5'9" - all athletically built? I'm sure we'd probably wouldn't have much extra room, will we have to sleep head to toe?

Lastly - can anyone compare this to the Sierra Designs Lightning XT4? (Besides being a little bigger and heavier)

(0)

 

0 Answers

0 Comments

Kretzky

Kretzky wrote a review of on December 7, 2009

5 5

I can't believe no one has reviewed this awesome bag yet, so I'll try to give a pretty thorough one.

I've had this bag for a month now and finally got a chance to put it to the test. With a weekend trip to my folks, the forecast calling for snow on the east coast, and an overnight low around 30, I couldn't think of a better time to try the Nitro out. So here's the results of my little field test.

I'm not entirely sure how companies rate sleeping bag temperatures. But here is my experience with this bag. First off - I am typically a warm sleeper, as in "sleeping next to you is like sleeping next to a heater." That said I set out deep into the backyard to make camp, threw on a midweight base layer (IB260 top, paty Cap3 Pants), some [lightweight] running socks and crawled into my bivy and the Nitro.

The hood cinches down nicely around the face, however it would've been great if they had given up an extra ounce to add something to make the opening a little softer against the face. Where the cords were drawn tight was stiff. However, I did have this thing cinched down to "blowhole" size around my mouth and nose.

I was warm when I crawled into the bag and stayed warm through the night. It was definitely cold when I woke up and I was still pretty comfy - I could feel some of the coldness coming up through the ground. I was sleeping on a Therm-a-rest Neoair, and should've had a Z-lite mat under it, but didn't. So my insulation from the ground wasn't quite what it should've been. The only thing that was cold were my feet. I blame that on the lightweight running socks, had I been smart and put on a pair of midweight wool hiking socks I think they would've been fine.

There was plenty of frozen condensation inside the bivy – a testament to the freezing temperatures, but the down stayed dry. I certainly wouldn't call this bag's liner waterproof, but it did its job against the condensation. Even after being woken up to the sound of my father's laughter as a snowball exploded against my bivy and I was showered in frozen condensation, I was able to shake the ice off the Nitro.

I got up and went in the house to find out that it had actually dropped to 23 degrees overnight! No wonder my feet were a little chilly and I could feel the cool ground through the sleeping pad!

A few other thoughts and notes - The stuff size say's 17 x 7in. That's the size of the stuff sack that comes with this bag. It can actually be compressed much smaller than that, probably around 12 x 6in. Maybe less, I should've measured. It also comes with a nice mesh storage bag, like any sleeper in this price range should. The foot vent is nice, although it was unnecessary in my latest experience. There are also nice stiffeners along the main zipper to prevent snagging which work well.

The flex baffles are awesome. I'm convinced this is one of the things that helped me stay warm despite going well below this bag's rated temp. I had been looking at Montbell's bags for this, but their regular bags are only good to 5'10" (I'm 6'). So I was really excited when this bag came out. Eliminating the dead air space, while still giving me the ability to move around a bit in the bag was definitely helpful in keeping me warm.

I would recommend this bag to anyone without hesitation. It’s light, warm, packs small, and certainly earned it’s 30 degree rating with me.

(3)

 

Kretzky

Kretzky wrote a question about on November 23, 2009

I'm considering this tent for some winter/alpine camping. How cramped is it gonna be for me (6' - 175lbs) and my brother (6'3" - 210lbs)? I've read some reviews that say it might be tight for someone over 6' - any taller guys out there tried this tent? Unfortunately outdoor stores in my area don't carry many 4-season tents. Thanks!

(0)