Kevin Lockett

Kevin Lockett

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Kevin Lockett

Kevin Lockett wrote an answer about on March 5, 2009

yes, the Denali Ascents are fairly hardcore and look the part. Also, the advantages of the ascents may be 'disadvantages' on less challenging terrain. They are super aggressive about traction- helpful in the mountains... not so much on the gold course. I would stick with MSR, the best company as far as I'm concerned, but I would look at the Lightning. All the Denali models (plastic decks) are noisy unless you're on fluffy stuff. Hope that helps,-----------I agree with the above statement...I would also recommend the Lightnings (not the Ascent model however). The reason for this I believe is because of their light weight and how easy they are to get on and off. They make snowshoeing a lot of fun. You will be the envy of all your friends:). As far as size goes, I would get the 25s.25 inch will be too small though if you are the first to make tracks in new snow.

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Kevin Lockett

Kevin Lockett wrote an answer about on March 4, 2009

I think the bindings may not accomidate a size 14. You may want to go with snowshoes that have more universal bindings like the MSR Denali series.I don't know the size of this snowshoe, but it looks too small for powder. You will need the largest snowshoe you can handle for powder. I can go through thick evergreens with 10x36. Not saying that is right for everyone, though. I can't foresee you doing much trailbreaking in powder with a 25 inch snowshoe, even if it was only a foot of powder. I would suggest 30 inch minimum, but my 30 inch snowshoes always stay at home for powder and I weigh only 165.

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Kevin Lockett

Kevin Lockett wrote an answer about on March 2, 2009

MSR has a snowshoe that allows you to add on flotation tails in various lengths. (denali Classic) Great Shoe!It seems 35 inches is as about as large as they come. But unless you are plus-sized, that should be pretty good.I totally agree! Its a conspiracy! I guess they want us to suffer and they want us to think that bright paint somehow makes us float! Anyway, I did just find out that gv snowshoes makes a 12x 42 called Wide Trail. This is very interesting to me, also. They are over $300., though, and am not sure how balanced they are. The picture shows a 28 inch snowshoe and the binding far forward which I don't like at all. They weigh 7.67 pounds also, which does sound a bit heavy. They do have a variety of sizes in the wide trail model. I love my 10x36 Tubbs, but would love to try a bigger snowshoe, as long as it had the advantages of the high tech binding and decking.

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Kevin Lockett

Kevin Lockett wrote an answer about on March 2, 2009

get the 25" pair. Always think bigger snowshoe more surface area, more floatation. Base your fit on your body weight plus whatever gear. Figure clothing & a day pack at around 10-12 added lbs.If you're looking to do any off trail stuff, a larger shoe may be nice for the deep white stuff.I weigh 165 also and am 6'1. I would recommend a 30 inch minimum snowshoe for you for powder.

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Kevin Lockett

Kevin Lockett wrote an answer about on March 2, 2009

You need the lightning accent------------I would also recommend the Lightning Ascent based on the more durable materials, three straps on the fore foot rather than two for more stability, more aggressive frame traction, and the famous climbing bar which allows more of the muscles in your legs to climb up steep terrain. As far as the size goes, I try to get away with the smallest snowshoe I can. The reasons being a smaller snowshoe is lighter, easier to maneuver in, less likely to be stepped on, easier to get up if I fall, less effort dragging them through the snow, etc. I would, therefore, recommend the MSR Lightning Ascent 25s for you. However, if you find yourself in deep snow often and you don't mind a bigger shoe, the 30 inchers might be a better option. They will give you slightly more loft (meaning keep you more on top of the snow) and the Lightning Ascent series snowshoes are the same width throughout the line meaning that they are all pretty easy to get around in (some snowshoes increase their width the larger they get making it more difficult to walk). Both sizes will accommodate men's feet up to size 15.To balance your advice here, when hiking trailless and trail breaking, you should go with the biggest snowshoe you can handle, not the smallest. Smallest is for broken trail and very firm conditions only. The definition of snowshoeing seems to be forgotten after high tech snowshoeing came along. There is still only one way to stay up on soft snow and that is to use a large snowshoe. Unfortunately, the manufacturers make very few large snowshoes. I really don't know why customers don't demand bigger ones myself.

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Kevin Lockett

Kevin Lockett wrote an answer about on March 2, 2009

I think the tails for the EVO only come in 6 inch....the denali snowshoe has 4inch and 8 inch, and understand that the classic extensions don't fit the EVO shoe!Weighing 250 and fluffy deep snow is a tough combination. I have a pair of Tubbs Sierra snowhoes that they put the binding too far forward. I am critical of this because I like balanced flotation. MSR's mimic this by adding flotation to the tail. I love my Tubbs Katahdins and Yukons because they are balanced and give me a choice each day of a small or big snowshoe. If you want just one pair to reach for, then the MSR tail idea may be the way to go if you can stand sinking forward on flats and especially downhills. This particular model says sleek, so that may not be best for 250 pounds either.

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Kevin Lockett

Kevin Lockett wrote an answer about on March 2, 2009

I would go with the 25"er. This will give you all the float you'll need.I think it should be stated that 25 inch snowshoes are very bad for a 180 pound person breaking trail. If you are coordinated and physically capable of breaking trail, I would recommend 30 inch snowshoes mimimum. I am 6' 1 and weigh 165. I use 25 inch snowshoes for firm conditions and 36 inch snowshoes for trail breaking. Personally, I wish there were bigger high tech snowshoes available. I see gv has a 12x42, but haven't seen a picture to know if the binding sits in the middle for a well balanced snowshoe, which I think is important when you want flotation, but I digress.

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