Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown

Utah/California

    New Feature

    Browse Your Followers or See Who You're Following

  • #6620of 20462

Kevin's Passions

Backpacking
Hiking
Bouldering

Kevin's Bio

With my Dad's bum knee, my outdoors adventures didn't start until I got out of my parents house. I've been hooked ever since. Backpacking is my favorite, whether I'm high up in the Wind Rivers, Down low in the deserts or Southern Utah, or somewhere in the middle in the Wasatch range, I'm a happy hiker. I like to go light and fast.

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on February 9, 2011

Both AC and Albert are correct, those boots aren't the best boots for crampon use, but these crampons will do a great job strapping to them.

For what its worth, my winter hiking boots are not made for mountaineering, and because they don't have a shank they are very flexible. I have taken my boots with these crampons up slopes greater than 45 degrees with no problems, it's just a little more work for the calves.

(1)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote a review of on February 9, 2011

Perfect
5 5

I am extremely pleased with these crampons. I have been putting them on a semi bulky size 10 winter hiking boot. If I was one shoe size bigger, I'd need the extender bar. The crampons come with a little more strap than you need, so I would recommend cutting off a few inches.

I've never had to touch or adjust or tighten the crampons once strapped on, they stay in place just as you would hope. I don't plan on doing any ice climbing in these, but these will be my go to crampons for anything short of that.

(1)

 

0 Comments

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote a review of on February 1, 2011

5 5

I spent some time trying to decide whether or not I wanted the Raven or Raven Pro. I ended up finding a deal on the Raven that I couldn't pass up, so I bought it hoping that I would be happy... and I am

The two axes are nearly identical with the weight decreasing as the price increases.

Like anyone else I am concerned with weight, but when I got a chance to compare my Raven with a Raven Pro, I really couldn't tell the weight difference while holding them side by side. The Pro has a shinier and slightly smaller head as you can see in the pictures, but otherwise they are nearly identical. I am sure a scale could tell the difference, but it's pretty close.

Given the same length of the two different axes, I don't feel that the small weight difference should be a determining factor, they really are that close to each other. If money is an issue you will be happy with the Raven, if it isn't then choose whatever you think looks better. Either way you will be happy with a great axe.

(1)

 

0 Comments

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on November 17, 2010

Great question, that could be debated from both sides pretty easily. I own the Baltoro 70 and love it, but was also considering this pack when I bought mine.

Here are a few things to consider. There isn't one single pack that fits all people better than another pack. Gregory packs fit me better than osprey packs, but you might be different.

The Gregory is on the heavy side weighing 5lb 5oz compared to this pack at 4lb 2oz. The Baltoro has an external water bottle pocket that fits a Nalgene perfectly as well as an internal hydration sleeve.

I like that the osprey has an external and accessible hydration sleeve. The built in rain cover is a huge plus as well, as I feel like they are extremely useful in wet conditions. They have to be purchased separately with the Baltoro.

I feel like this osprey beats out the Baltoro feature wise, so for me it came down to comfort. A slightly heavier and more comfortable pack can make your load feel 10lbs lighter than a lighter less comfortable pack, but if you are lucky this pack will be comfortable for you. The packs are similar enough to each other that comfort should be your deciding factor.

I would try to find local stores that carry these packs, so you can try them both on before making a decision.

Good luck and happy hiking!!

(0)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on November 17, 2010

Jeremy, This pack would fit you fine, but before buying anything I would also take a look at the internal frame brother of this pack, the Kelty Cyote. It is in the same price range, but gives you a fully internal frame pack with most of the same features as the more expensive top tier packs.

I prefer internal frame packs simply because they do a better job of protecting my gear, while still giving me the option to strap a pad or tent to the outside if I have to, though I usually find a way to get all of my gear on the inside

With that being said, some people still and always will prefer external frame packs as it gives them the ability to attach bulky or awkward objects on the outside of the pack without worrying about how they fit on the inside. It also gives them faster access to these objects, which can be nice for getting camp set up quick.

Good luck on your decision

(0)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on November 17, 2010

In my opinion this is by far the best pack you can get in this price range and does extremely well even when compared to more expensive packs. They compress down nicely when you have less gear and are also great at expanding out when you have more gear.

I'm not sure what part of Africa you'll be in, but I spent a few years between Ghana and Cameroon, and when it rains, it rains hard! I would definitely shell out a few extra bucks for the rain cover for this pack.

Best of Luck on your trip, you'll love it!

(0)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on October 7, 2010

Amador,
I am roughly 5'9" and 150lbs. I ordered the small, because my torso length was right on the border of the small and medium version of this pack, and there was a really good deal on the small at the time. The pack is great, but if I had to do it again I would have gotten the medium for myself. You being 5'7 and 130lbs I would definitely go with the small version of the pack.

It's a great pack you're going to love it.

hope this helps!

(1)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on October 7, 2010

That will depend entirely on the size and type of your sleeping bag. I would use the following guidelines.

Medium (16L): Synthetic mummy bag rated from 15 to 25 degrees. Down mummy bag rated around 0 degrees.

Small (11L) : Synthetic 40 degree bags, Down 15 to 25 degree bags.

Large: Synthetic 0 degree mummy bags;

**Note, This should help get you into the right range, but remember things like whether you have the short, regular, or long version of your bag will also play into the equation. I have both a small and medium version of this compression sack and they have been able to cover all of my needs thus far. Remember Back country has a great return policy if you end up having to re-order.

(2)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on September 23, 2010

Normally I would say yes, but I think you are in the perfect range given your size. Just because you have 60 L of space doesn't mean you have to use 60 L of space. The compression straps should allow you to comfortably carry a smaller load needed. The fact that you like the way your argon fits is also a good indication that you will probably like the way this pack fits as well.

(0)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on August 11, 2010

Michael,  You will find that most synthetic...

Michael, You will find that most synthetic bags in the 20-30 degree range will compress down to about the same size with a good compression sack. I recommend the "Granite Gear Block Solid" size Medium (16 L) for this range of sleeping bags. It should compress down to about the size of a basketball. The attached picture is not this specific bag, but you should be able to compress it to about the same size.

Have you thought about making the jump to a down bag? Kelty makes a killer down bag for a really good price. It will cost more than most synthetic bags, but it should last twice as long, and it includes a compression sack so you wont have to spend an extra 30 to buy one. It is called the Kelty Lightyear 20, make sure you get the down* version. Anyways it's worth checking out.

http://www.backcountry.com/outdoorgear/Kelty-Light-Year-Sleeping-Bag-20-Degree-Down/KEL0582M.html

Hope this helps and good luck

(1)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on August 5, 2010

I can't speak to how they would perform specifically in a skiing situation, but I have hiked countless miles behind my buddy who uses these exact poles and I have seen him almost bite it several times where one or both of these poles has caught all of his weight and then supported it with no problems.

I'm sure it is possible to snap one of these in a hard and awkward skiing fall, as I have snapped a solid aluminum skiing pole in such a fall, but I would imagine that these would hold up as well if not better than most poles out there.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on August 5, 2010

Trina, I own the Z-lite as well as a regular Ridge-Rest, but I have used a friend's Ridge-Rest Deluxe.

Z-lite - this is easily the most versatile of the options as you can fold it into a thick cushy seat, but for simply laying down on hard bumpy ground this pad isn't the best in the world. Durablility won't be a problem with any of these three closed cell mattresses

Ridge-Rest - This will provide slightly more padding than the Z-lite, but won't easily make a great seat. This will also be a little tougher to move around as it doesn't have that quick folding accordion feature.

Ridge-Rest-Deluxe - This is pretty much the same pad as the Ridge-Rest, but noticeably thicker. It will pack slightly larger than the others, because it is bigger, but it is still lightweight. If carrying it around isn't a big issue this is probably your best bet. It is by far the most comfortable of the three, yet it can take the same amount of abuse.

I hope this helps you make your decision!

(2)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on August 5, 2010

Jerry, you are wise to shop around and ask...

Jerry, you are wise to shop around and ask questions. I am a big fan of both Therm-a-rest pads as well as Big Agnes pads, but you should take a look at the Big Agnes "Insulated" Aircore rather than the non-insulated version when comparing it to the neoair.

If you go for the mummy shape, regular length, you are looking at 21oz
2.5 inch thickness
72 x 20 (20 at shoulders, then tapered down towards the head and feet)
You'll have a considerable increase in warmth with an R-Value of 4.1 compared to 2.5
You still get the included stuff sack and repair kit.
Packs down tiny(See picture)

This Insulated Aircore is usually $75-$80 a little more than the non-insulated version, but its currently on sale for 59.96 (8/5/2010) here at Backcountry.com.

The neoair is cutting edge and lighter, but considerably more expensive and not quite as warm.

I hope this helps you make your decision.

(1)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on August 5, 2010

mjordan,

Slippery - This pad has a thin layer of silicone that does a pretty good job of gripping both tent floors and sleeping bags, so you need not worry too much about the pad being slippery.

Noisy - This is commonly brought up when talking about this pad. Due to the nature of the lightweight material it does make a little noise when there is movement on the pad (similar to the crinkling of a potato chip bag). For those using the pad this is a rarely an issue. The increase in comfort and decrease in weight are big enough bonuses that the noise is usually a negligible detractor. Most complaints I hear about noise are come from those sleeping next to the person one the pad (jealousy?).

If either you or the guy next to you are extremely light sleepers, then maybe remedy this with some earplugs, but this is still a great pad.

(3)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on August 5, 2010

Thanks for the responses. Granite Gear has a fairly new dry compression sack called the "AirVent Drybloc Solid". It competes with the StS eVent bag, but at a lower cost and a lighter weight. It seems like a perfect fit. I will try to give a report on it's durability and wet weather performance after more usage to see if it truly holds up to the StS eVent. (Pictures coming)

(0)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote a review of on August 4, 2010

5 5

I use purification drops and tablets and I love how easy it is to scoop water out of a stream with the wide mouth. I have had a few of these for several years.
-They make for a great measuring cup (when the marks are still there).
-They are easy to mix things in, just open the wide top pour stuff in and give it a shake.
-I am also impressed by the fact that they never leak, even after years of use.
-The attached lid creates a nice little loop when the top is on to make it easy to attach these bottles to pretty much anything with a beaner.

Great product that I will continue to use for years

(0)

 

0 Comments

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on August 4, 2010

While HCl is an abbreviation for Hydrochloric Acid, it is also an abbreviation for "Hairy cell leukemia" (an uncommon and slowly progressing B cell leukemia). Neither of these are things you want in your eyes, fortunately for you, neither of these things are put into these sunglasses.

HCL in this case stands for "High Contrast Lens", which are specifically designed to increase contrast and clarity on foggy/hazy/overcast days.

(1)

 

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown wrote an answer about on August 4, 2010

Teri, HCL stands for "high contrast lens" they are intended to improve contrast during hazy, overcast, or foggy days. Both lenses are polarized so they should help reduce reflection and glare off of things like glass and water.

They should both serve similar functionality, but if you are in constant hazy/foggy environments I would go for the glasses with the HCL lens, otherwise go for whatever you think looks the best.

Source: "http://www.landfallnavigation.com/mjhclbronze.html"

I hope this helps, best of luck!

(1)

 

load more