Kate Williamson

Kate Williamson

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Kate Williamson's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Running
Biking
Snowshoeing
Skiing
Climbing

Kate Williamson's Bio

Kate Williamson

Kate Williamson wrote a review of on June 13, 2013

5 5

Used this pack on a 3 day trip recently and was BLOWN AWAY with how well this one sizer carried 40lbs of gear! It was comfy, the foam never padded out so I didn't have to keep retightening the belt or shoulder straps, and the backpanel could adjust down to my smaller torso. Absolutely amazing.

Another different feature is the hipbelt. Usually, I have a hard time finding a hipbelt that can cinch down small enough for me. This hipbelt has a built in extender that can unvelcro and elongate the hipbelt for wider waists. Because of that, the existing hipbelt is smaller and fit my waist with room to cinch!

Hands down, this has to be one of the best carrying one-size-fits-most packs on the market. Amazing!!!

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Kate Williamson

Kate Williamson wrote an answer about on November 2, 2012

I have the ladies version--the Aria--and have used it with a backpack and purse, carrying boxes, metal grid, and arm loads of metal things (work) and have yet to snag/rip the exterior of my jacket.

Also, yes, it will be just as warm as 60g of primaloft. However, sweater-weight down has a wider comfort range than either fleece or primaloft--down breaths better so you can wear it in warmer situations, AND will be just as warm as as 60g of primaloft.

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Kate Williamson

Kate Williamson wrote an answer about on October 12, 2012

Depends on how aerobic you're getting. For the hiking, it will work just fine with just a base layer. For in-bounds skiing, you may need another layer if it's a super cold day. But the HighLoft should insulate well-enough for all but the coldest day and the softshell-exterior should be wind- and weather-resistant enough to retain that heat while heading downhill.

On a side-note, I believe the other layer that Kyle is wearing is the Ferrosi,which is a super light-weight softshell--the thickness is similar to a mid- or heavy-weight baselayer but with some weather resistance. Probably wearing it in case he needs to de-layer from overheating without having to be completely shell-less for any longth of time in the high-alpine...

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Kate Williamson

Kate Williamson wrote an answer about on October 8, 2012

The backpanel is a closed cell foam that is ridged to create air channels--not bad ventilation but not the absolute best either. If you are not willing to go without removed backpanel ventilation, give the Stratos a try.

Word of warning, since the Stratos has a removed backpanel, the frame is super stiff and has been known to bump against the helmet while riding...

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Kate Williamson

Kate Williamson wrote an answer about on October 8, 2012

There are two main reasons for the zippered access point. 1. It is an access point for Osprey to get at something--an area of the frame for example--if the pack is sent in for a warranty. 2. Osprey hates the idea of "wasted space" so if they can give the consumer access to an area easily--for stashing a layer or a spare reservoir--they'll give you access to that region.

So that's why there is a zipper there. Not everyone will use it, but it's there if you want to.

(2)

 

Kate Williamson

Kate Williamson wrote a review of on October 4, 2012

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Demoed this pack on several trails in SW Utah--lovely slot canyons and desert hikes. This pack carries well--but it only gets four stars because the adjustability range isn't quite small enough for my torso (which I guess you could make the argument that I should get the 4 stars and not the pack, but whatever). Though the shoulder harness can move up and down, giving you a bit of adjustability within the S/M and M/L, the S/M did not go down quite small enough for me. Also, the waist almost didn't cinch down small enough either.

Aside for it being a little long and therefore rubbing my sacrum and my shoulders a little too much, it fit a great deal of stuff comfortably and in a well-organized manor, was bomb-proof rubbing against rock in the slot canyons, and has external slot for hydration (so no slipping a hose though an annoying tiny slot in the pack and no struggle to load a full reservoir into the inside of a full pack).

There are many other delightful things about this pack (large hipbelt pockets and included rain fly that I almost had to use while hiking in the desert) but those listed above are the top three for me.

But again, this may not be the greatest if you are of petite stature as it didn't work well for my 15" torso, 26" waisted self.

(0)

 

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Kate Williamson

Kate Williamson wrote a review of on October 4, 2012

Go To Day Hiking
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I used this pack on a whim as I was more inclined to like something like a bomb-proof Kestrel 32. After demo'ing both, I love the Exos 34 as my go to day pack. Ultra light with a frame to make any weight carry awesome. I can fit a barrage of gear in this pack AND have brought it on some very rocky trails with no rock abrasion holes yet!

As far as fit, I am pretty petite--15" torso and a 26" waist. The Small fits super nicely, which is not common in a "unisex" style pack.

It also carries a tired 3.5mo puppy well.

(1)

 

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