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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith

Switzerland

Joshua Keith's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Running
Biking
Skiing
Climbing

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on May 29, 2011

4 5

I led winter trips in Maine for 10 years and always had to carry 2 sleeping pads- foam and thermares- because at -20F the cold just seemed to seep through everything. I had this pad out for a full season and never once found a cold spot or noticed a rough patch of ground. It may be heavier than a three quarter length ultra-light pad, but it is lighter than any two pad combo. Two drawbacks that I noticed... you are WAY up in the air. Compared to a standard thermarest, you feel like you're doing a highwire act. If you're sleeping outside the height is nice to avoid snow/water, but if you're afraid of heights or your girl wants to cuddle from her "short" pad you might have issues. Also, in a BA bag, this pad is so tall that it cuts into some of your snuggle room. With the Pomer Hoit, which is supposed to be snug, I feel a bit claustrophobic, but warm... and sleeping 20 or more days outside at -20, well warm is good.

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review flagged as for an older model of this pack. Click here to view.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on March 2, 2009

2 5

I've climbed in these gloves for several seasons. In my opinion, they're more of a novelty item than a serious piece of equipment. They're not warm enough unless the temps are 20+ and the sun is shining. For steep mixed routes on warm days, they're fun to pull out of your pack and watch your friends sneer. The grip with them is better than the grip bare handed. I picked up 3 pair when they went on sale for $15. I tried all kinds of things- like taping heater packs to my wrists- to use them in a wider range of conditions. On top of that, the gloves durability is not great. I suppose for fall/spring dry tooling they may be excellent- but for true winter conditions, expect to loose digits.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on February 10, 2009

5 5

This is a great stuff sack that I picked up on a super sale. It does exactly what is says, allows air to pass out of the bag while compressing... and remains waterproof. My sleeping bag went swimming on a canoe trip (along with the rest of my gear) and emerged dry as a bone. Durable, light, simple... just not cheap.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on February 10, 2009

5 5

For cold winter camping, this thing is great. While not recommended, one could light this lantern inside a tent and realize that the tent quickly becomes a warm dry haven despite the sub-zero temperatures outside. One would have to be careful, but it is a nice way to warm up for the change to or from the sleeping bag. Otherwise, this little lantern provides a great deal of light. It takes a beating, travels light, and performs well- just keep it away from flamable stuff, it doesn't play nice with nylon.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on February 4, 2009

4 5

I've climbed on them for the past 4 seasons and stand by the performance. They're a bit heavy as Scott mentioned, but after 4 seasons I'm in better shape and the tools are still workhorses. If you only have 1 set of tools, this is a really good choice. You can play on long alpine routes with a mixture of snow and ice, but the tools are equally at home on vertical ice. With a good variety of picks, mixed pick, lazer, and titan, you can really customize the tool to the type of climbing you enjoy or plan on for any given weekend.

The android leash also provides some of the benefits of leashless climbing, ie easy screw placement and switching tools, without committing to leashless climbing. If you are interested in climbing with these tools leashless- save yourself the frustration and buy a leashless tool. With some add-ons they might look leashless, but they are a leashed tool- that's their strength.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on January 28, 2009

5 5

This is not a delicate pole... after a disappointing experience with a set of Leki's I tried these puppies out. I wish they offered a cork grip, but the locking mechanism is glove friendly and reliable... unlike the Leki's... the poles are strong and durable. Whether you're using them to hold up a Kiva shelter or you while you're crossing a stream, they will stay exactly where you set them.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on January 28, 2009

5 5

I led trips in Northern Maine for the past 10 years and was constantly searching for a sleeping pad that could handle the extreme cold, -30F, that we suffered through up there. Before this pad I had to carry a thermarest and a ridgerest- otherwise you could feel the cold seep through. With this pad, I have never felt the cold. It literally adds a few degrees to your bags comfort rating. I don't roll around much, so I can't really comment on how easy it is to stay on... you're pretty high up with the pad fully inflated. Using the pad with a regular sleeping bag worked great- using it with a Big Agnes bag I found the pad so big that there was hardly room left for me... and I'm only 5'8" 160lbs... a friend borrowed my gear and literally couldn't zip the bag shut. If your a small individual, Big Agnes also stands for BA gear... it performs well and is super durable. Considering that I could only carry one pad, this system saved weight. For summer or fall travel, it's overkill and heavy.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on January 27, 2009

5 5

Ignore the 'recall' comment. These crampons were recalled two years ago because a few climbers were breaking the extremely long front points. I climbed on the crampons and loved the performance. I grudgingly turned in my crampons when the 'recall' notice came in. Now that the crampons have been redesinged- I can't wait to buy a set. They are amazing at holding in anything- this is the ultimate mixed mountaineering crampon... the front points are long enough to puncture through aerated ice/frozen moss or anything else and give you reliable purchase. The twin tips also provide a very stable platform for placing equipment. Love em.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on January 27, 2009

2 5

LEKI is the big name in poles, but honestly, I was disappointed. The cork grips were nice, but the locking mechanisms are not user friendly in the winter and broke after a short period of time. Look at the Black Diamonds... better locking system which is glove friendly and doesn't break/collapse without warning.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on January 27, 2009

5 5

I own a Prolite 4 3/4 length pad and love it for simplicity and light-weight traveling. It rolls down to nothing and is super durable... mine is several years old and has never "popped". (FYI, don't leave yours near a stove closed. A buddies popped when the air expanded and had no where to go... amusing so long as it isn't yours). Unfortunately, I've found that the cold seeps right through this pad in the winter... either carry two pads or consider the Big Agnes Dual core... it's heavier, but you only have to carry 1 pad, at the end of the day it is lighter.

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Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on January 27, 2009

5 5

I've used these professionally for the past 4 years. Whether on a personal jaunt or guided trip, the Miox is simple and light weight. It is similar to iodine in that you need to wait for the ionized solution to treat your water, but it's treat a go unlike a pump. So stop, fill, treat, and 20 minutes down the trail go ahead and drink. Battery life is affected by the cold- and the batteries aren't easy to find so if you're traveling off the beaten path you may want to think about extra batteries or another system. Otherwise, I carried 1 set of batteries and treated enough water for a group of 10 for 12 days.

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