Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith

Switzerland

    New Feature

    Browse Your Followers or See Who You're Following

  • #8976of 19740

Josh's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Running
Biking
Skiing
Climbing

Josh's Bio

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on May 29, 2011

4 5

I led winter trips in Maine for 10 years and always had to carry 2 sleeping pads- foam and thermares- because at -20F the cold just seemed to seep through everything. I had this pad out for a full season and never once found a cold spot or noticed a rough patch of ground. It may be heavier than a three quarter length ultra-light pad, but it is lighter than any two pad combo. Two drawbacks that I noticed... you are WAY up in the air. Compared to a standard thermarest, you feel like you're doing a highwire act. If you're sleeping outside the height is nice to avoid snow/water, but if you're afraid of heights or your girl wants to cuddle from her "short" pad you might have issues. Also, in a BA bag, this pad is so tall that it cuts into some of your snuggle room. With the Pomer Hoit, which is supposed to be snug, I feel a bit claustrophobic, but warm... and sleeping 20 or more days outside at -20, well warm is good.

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

Review flagged as for an older model of this pack. Click here to view.

0 Comments

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote an answer about on April 26, 2009

The adze is useful if you plan on doing 'alpine' style routes, longer less vertical routes where you can take the time to prepare screw placements and even cheat by cutting steps to steady yourself while placing a screw. On vertical ice you really don't have the time (strength) to chop screw placements so many people have shifted to climbing with two hammers, or even 'blanks' which are neither hammer nor adze to save weight. P.S. Don't hammer in screws.

(2)

 

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote an answer about on March 23, 2009

Much to the disappointment of Marmot... I would build your own. It's cheaper and lighter. Take 5mm plastic available at any hardware store and cut it to fit your tent exactly. Then add packaging tape reinforcements to the edges (you can get super fancy and add tie out points using p-cord and packaging tape). In general, I've found these homemade jobs to be more waterproof, cheaper, and lighter than the 'officials'. Also, the provide plenty of protection. I've used this system with a sil-nylon tent, think crepe paper, for 5 years and the tent's floor is still without damage. Also, if you do happen to tear the "footprint"... well, it will cost you about $0.17 to build a new one. Light, functional, durable, cheap...

(5)

 

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote an answer about on March 23, 2009

Any tent that has a full coverage fly, such as this one, can have condensation problems. Essentially, we put out a tremendous amount of water vapor at night. As the temps drop, that vapor condenses on the interior of the fly, or possibly even the inner wall of the tent, and then can be a problem. A few thoughts, avoid bringing wet gear into your tent... any added moisture will make this problem worse and leave your door open if there isn't a danger of rain. While some tents avoid issues by placing vents in key locations, this ALPs doesn't have those features and the large flat area on the top can encourage drops to collect and fall on the upper mesh, which may eventually lead to a few drops inside the tent. This doesn't mean it's a bad tent, just part of the game. If you really want to avoid the moisture problem, look for a tent with steeper walls (to allow the condensation to run down the sides) or vents in the fly.

(3)

 

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on March 2, 2009

2 5

I've climbed in these gloves for several seasons. In my opinion, they're more of a novelty item than a serious piece of equipment. They're not warm enough unless the temps are 20+ and the sun is shining. For steep mixed routes on warm days, they're fun to pull out of your pack and watch your friends sneer. The grip with them is better than the grip bare handed. I picked up 3 pair when they went on sale for $15. I tried all kinds of things- like taping heater packs to my wrists- to use them in a wider range of conditions. On top of that, the gloves durability is not great. I suppose for fall/spring dry tooling they may be excellent- but for true winter conditions, expect to loose digits.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote an answer about on February 25, 2009

If you're not backpacking, get the heaviest (most durable) compression sack that you can find. Don't worry about waterproofness, save your money. Think about the Granite Gear or Outdoor Research products. They're durable and inexpensive, BC has a few for around $25. If you plan on "risking" rain, then drop the extra 10 bucks and get a waterproof one like the Sea to Summit event stuff sack.

(0)

 

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on February 23, 2009

4 5

I bought these shoes as hikers not runners and have found them well suited to the job. The sole is stiff and supports well. The gaiters are worth much but they do keep scree and snow out of your socks. They're durable- after several months of use only the 'La Sportiva' lettering is falling off. I've tried running with them- imagine strapping a pair of bricks to your feet. If you were doing adventure races- ie jogging- then maybe these would work, but they're just not nimble enough to handle anything else.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on February 10, 2009

5 5

This is a great stuff sack that I picked up on a super sale. It does exactly what is says, allows air to pass out of the bag while compressing... and remains waterproof. My sleeping bag went swimming on a canoe trip (along with the rest of my gear) and emerged dry as a bone. Durable, light, simple... just not cheap.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote a review of on February 10, 2009

5 5

For cold winter camping, this thing is great. While not recommended, one could light this lantern inside a tent and realize that the tent quickly becomes a warm dry haven despite the sub-zero temperatures outside. One would have to be careful, but it is a nice way to warm up for the change to or from the sleeping bag. Otherwise, this little lantern provides a great deal of light. It takes a beating, travels light, and performs well- just keep it away from flamable stuff, it doesn't play nice with nylon.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote an answer about on February 7, 2009

This is a very functional and value oriented package. It gets the job done without any bells or whistles. I like the beacon and the probe... the shovel leaves something to be desired... it seems too small and ricketty... nothing more than opinion though. I like building a avi kit from scratch with all the bits and pieces that I like- you only buy it once and it last for years, get the good stuff.

(0)

 

Joshua Keith

Joshua Keith wrote an answer about on February 6, 2009

Speaking from a racer/coach perspective, Klister is never a good thing. It's messy to apply and messy to clean up. No matter how careful you are it gets everywhere... that said, in the right conditions it will perform well and last longer than traditional hard wax. I would recommend a universal -5/+5 klister. In general, if you have fresh snow klister is not the correct choice- a hard wax will bind to sharp, well formed snow crystals and is easier to use... also, fluffy snow will stick to klister no matter how thin of a layer you put on. I would recommend sticking with one company... either Swix, Star, or Toko... in general, each line performs predictably, but if you start mixing lines their properties get blended and it gets more difficult.

(0)

 

load more