Josh Good

Josh Good

Unalaska Island, AK

Joshua 's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Paddling
Skiing

Joshua 's Bio

I'm a teacher in the Aleutian Islands, loving life. I do my best to ski the snow we get, but my real passion is kayaking. I've been paddling since I was a tike in PA. Moving to Alaska introduced me to sea kayaking in some of the (arguably) most beautiful places in the world. After spending several winters enduring Fairbanks' Arctic Chill, and a few summers paddling Prince William Sound, I got engaged, moved to this Awesome rock of an island, got married, and began dealing with the pre-teens that are my students. The kids can't believe the weather and difficulties my wife, dogs, friends, and I all endure to do what we love. I can't begin to imagine the influence and ideas I've created in their minds, but it's definitely for the better!
If you visit Unalaska, look me up, and we'll go for a paddle.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote a review of on October 16, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

We use the head strap for diving. It does a pretty good job of keeping the camera in position, but our neoprene hoods aren't the grippiest head gear out there. Even with the silicone squiggles for added grip, we've had a time or two where it fell off.. So now we're just sure to get our mask strap over top of the head strap. The big thing is that the camera stays pointing in the direction we pointed it and doesn't bobble around while we're swimming.

Cons:
Can slip off

Pros:
Camera Stays in position
Silicone on underside for added grip
Pretty Good grip on neoprene

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote a review of on September 30, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Huge Thanks to Backcountry.com and Aqua-Bound for hand-selecting me to review their Surge Glass Paddle for the benefit of the backcountry.com community.

Since paddle choice is based on a combo of the boat, the paddler, and the paddling style, I'll start out with the facts: I'm 6 feet tall and have a pretty average length torso, thus, I have a pretty average amount of upper body sticking out of my kayak. I paddle a Necky Chatham 16, which is a pretty quick and responsive sea kayak set up for play and short tours. My boat is 22 inches wide at the cockpit (relatively narrow), and my paddle style is pretty low and mellow- usually more of a low-angle paddler. Even with the combo of my height and the narrowness of my boat, I've gotten used to paddles that are a bit above the recommended size and have used mostly 240cm low angle paddles.

We'll start this off with the Bottom Line: Despite being advertised as a High-Angle paddle, the Surge is suited more to a low angle paddler's needs. Regardless, the Surge is a high quality, light weight addition to your kayaking experience. Whether it be an evening paddle or a multi-day tour, this paddle gets the job done and does it well.

Now for the Surge..

While this paddle is Aqua-Bound's high angle paddle with their widest blade, the blade is not much wider or longer than other brand's low angle paddles. The measurements for the blade are 6.8in wide and 19in long (17.27cm x 48.26cm), about an inch wider and two inches shorter than Aqua-Bound's Swell Paddle, their low angle piece.

The Surge is super lightweight for its class (not comparing to full carbon paddles), and for a touring paddle, weight is an essential thought. Reining in at a mere 29oz (822 grams), the Surge helps to combat fatigue. Think about how many times you pick up your paddle on any given day on the water. With its low numbers, the Surge is a pleasure to hold, lift, push, pull, and repeat for as long as your tour allows.

... Review CONTINUED in Comments Below...

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote an answer about on September 30, 2014

Hey Bill,
The way you've written your question, it sounds like you're trying to stay with your boat rather than keep your paddle. A paddle leash is meant to keep the paddle with you in a wipe out. If that is the case, and you are trying to keep your paddle with you rather than your boat, this will definitely get the job done. Now if you're trying to stay tethered to your boat, that's not the intended purpose of this piece, and while it might work, I wouldn't bet on it.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote an answer about on September 29, 2014

I'm not a WW paddler, i stick to bigger boats, but your size and the size of your boat definitely make a difference in how your boat performs. If your near or past the max of your boat, it will most likely decrease the stability, and the fit might be a bit tight. But the other end of things, is that you'll most likely have a more than enough power to control and throw around your boat. You should always test a boat out before you buy it.. even if its just in flat water. Its like a new pair of pants, you gotta like the fit.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote an answer about on August 19, 2014

That seems like an awful lot of work just for they kayaks. If you were going to use the rack for other things as well (i.e. bikes, skis..) then it might be worth it. If your boats are plastic and you're not travelling through super hot and sunshiney places for long amounts of time, you'll probably be good just having them rest on the tail gate and fastening the bottom end to the bed near the cab.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote an answer about on May 21, 2014

I'm a big guy like you, and in all my kayaking, bigger is better for us big guys. The length not only gives you the extra flotation, but it also adds to stability and keeping it going straight. I'd say the extra hundo is worth it.. you figure after 10 days paddling, it is only ten bucks per day.. Good luck.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote an answer about on March 31, 2014

I have the regular block mount on my jeeps rack. I drilled two holes through the rack and have the mount attached with two bolts. I then attach the back tire to the back rack with a cam strap. Super quick and easy. As long as you're willing to drill some holes into the top of your camper, you'd be able to attach the mount. You'd just have to figure out a way to keep the rear tire tied down.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote a review of on March 27, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

I dont know much about any of carhartt's other pants, these are the only ones i've ever owned. I wear them until they are ridden with holes. When they reach a certain point, my wife forces me to start wearing the newer pair she had gotten me months before as she secretly disposes of the holy pair. While my carhartt's always end up in shambles, it is definitely not because of a lack in quality. I beat the blank outta these pants, and they are a daily driver for me. everything from construction, to cutting wood, to hiking, to sitting on the couch. These are it. You need a tough pair of pants? These are it.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote a review of on March 27, 2014

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

The skirt around the bottom of this bag is what makes it worth while. Other than the skirt, there are better options for double bags out there, not that this is a terrible bag, its just that it serves it's purpose and nothing more. The skirt is equipped with a drawstring to help secure it around the mattress. I've used it more in the house than while camping, but it's always done the job keeping us warm.
Bottom Line: If you're using an air matress, go with this bag, if not, look elsewhere.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote a review of on March 27, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I had a chance to look at the remix in person a few days ago and was impressed by the way the skeg is deployed/retracted. The knob at the right rear of the cockpit is super easy to reach, and turns about 90 degrees to deploy the skeg. While i could imagine some issues with ice, and i'm not exactly sure whether it is controlled by stiff cable, a cord or something else, the mechanism was incredibly simple. It slid both ways with hardly any resistance. Impressively done liquidlogic.
Besides the skeg, its a pretty skookum boat. Seemingly prepared for most water situations, minus open ocean and huge water and packed with features. A very well thought out boat.
And the green is Awesome.

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Josh Good

Josh Good wrote an answer about on March 27, 2014

Paddle length is usually more based on the size of the paddler, but it is important to have the right style paddle for your use. This paddle, with the longer narrower blade (when compared to Aquabound's Mantaray) is designed for a "low angle" paddle stroke which is a more relaxed stroke. The Mantaray for example is more of a high angle paddle which would be used for a faster or more powerful stroke. Use Werner's Paddle fit guide here to help you out: http://wernerpaddles.com/fit_guide_widget/
Also, for what its worth, in all the sea kayak guiding I've done, we offered 230 and 240 paddles to everyone except kids who got 210s. At 6'1'', so quite a bit smaller than yourself, I prefer the longer paddle for sea kayaking. I'm not quite sure what you mean by "cruising," but I would venture that the 240 would be your best bet. Check the paddle fit guide to make sure you're getting the right blade type for your uses, and you should be set! Good Luck!

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