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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on September 14, 2011

5 5

This is just an out-of-the box review, but I'm super excited about it. Because I haven't actually used it yet, I can really only verify the specs. It weighs (with the two straps but without the included stuff sack and patch kit) 21 and 3/8 ounces (just under 1.5 pounds), and measures 4.75" x 11" when rolled! This is WAY smaller than I expected, but I think I might just pay more attention and take more time to roll things smaller than most. With it rolled so small, the velcro straps don't quite line up because the strap ends up wrapping all the way around and covers the "loop" side of the velcro leaving nowhere for the "hooks" to hook up. The stuff sack is too big for this bag, and I don't think I'll be using it much. Perhaps I can stick some long johns in there with it or something, but I just don't see myself using it much.

It was either this pad or the Big Agnes Insulated Air Core pad, and from a money perspective, this is such a great deal (from the SAC anyway). It is nearly equivalent in every way. The quoted weights are practically equal, the packed sizes are comparable, and although the R-Value of the BA is a bit higher, I'm going to be bring a foam pad along with me when it really counts anyway (Thermarest Z-lite), and I on't need too much more than that (I read somewhere that this pad has approximately 2.9 average R-value).

I'm very excited, and I can't believe how inexpensive this was for the product.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on June 23, 2011

5 5

Just picked this bag up from SAC for a steal and I love it. I'm 6'3" and 200 lbs and got the long which fits great. It leaves plenty of room for taller people and had lots of space in the torso area for shoulders and arms. I will not have any problems fitting, even with a warm base layer and a liner. I'm most excited about this bag because it will be great for my summer bicycle touring trips, and if I couple this with my Marmot Never Winter (which is only good for 3 seasons), I'll have a modular sleeping system that I can use in all four seasons.

The bag (long) packed into the included stuff sack is 24 ounces, which is nearly half the Never Winter (also long), and measures 5.75"DIA x 8.75"long, which is a touch smaller than the specs listed on the website. And just to be clear, getting it in that stuff sack is no easy chore and I don't believe it can get much smaller with a compression sack. I might be getting a compression sack anyway, simply because the stuff sac looks pretty stressed with the bag jammed in there, and I would hate for it to bust the seams in the middle of a trip and have to carry it around all fluffy like.

I wish I could give you a temperature that I've slept in it down to, but my thermometer didn't seem to be working. I tested it side-by-side with a Lafuma Simple Use 600 (long, again) which has almost identical specs but half the price, and after the test I would say it is also half the bag. The test was performed in my living room during several consecutive cold spring nights with the windows open. The thermometer read 75degF, but now I'm realizing that it only reads 75degF and never changes. I would have guessed it was down to the mid to high 50's and the weather reports in my city say it was high 40's/low 50's. I was much warmer in the Sunrise and didn't wake up much, but I woke cold several times in the Lafuma.

Also, the Sunrise compresses much easier than the Lafuma and feels like a sturdier construction. If I had to pay full price for the Sunrise I would have gone with the Lafuma because it was still a good bag, but at the SAC price for the Sunrise, it wasn't a tough decision. Twice the bag for twice the price seems fare to me. I love the bag and this is addition is one of the last additions I need to completing my ideal system.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on November 9, 2010

4 5

This thing is supper light, and if its from SAC, its better than a steel (there's a play on words for you). I only give it four stars because I'm disappointed with the non-stickiness of it. Actually, I would have given it three stars because I'm so disappointed, but in reality, without non-stick its just the same as any other Ti pot set, but at a better price.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote an answer about on October 13, 2010

I got the Tiger, and it is super bright give-you-a-sun-burn orange. A little tough for me to handle, but it is still nice. I really wish that it was the same pale gold color shown in the picture online. It seems like they have a bit of a color shift on these colors, because someone else on here was commenting that the sapphire (the color I really wanted until I read their review) was a straight up purple.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on October 13, 2010

4 5

I haven't used this jacket yet, so this review may be a bit premature, but it feels like a well made jacket that fits great and should be pretty warm.

To start out: Appearance. I got the Tiger, and my god is it orange. The pictures online make it seem like a nice pale gold, but its more Atomic Orange than anything. I'm somewhat of a subtle kind of guy, so I'm having trouble with the color, and it might end up going back. The fit is fantastic. I'm 6'3", 190#, long arms, and this jacket fits really really well (its actually a little too large, but I think I'll cope). For more detail, check out my answer to BrayD's question on fit.

Next up: Performance. Like i said, I haven't tested it out, but it does feel like a nice warm down sweater. No blizzards or frigid nights, but I wouldn't hesitate on a sunny day with snow filling the streets of Boston. Don't expect TOO much, as this is an ultralight sweater like thing, but layering with a fleece will take this a long long way. It comes with a stuff sack, but it can be compressed way further than that. You can also (somewhat awkwardly) invert it into its own breast pocket, but the zipper doesn't close easily as it wasn't designed for such. My size large weighed in at 11.6 oz, and stuffed into the pocket it is about 7"x7"x4". It feels extremely well made and I'm certain it'll last a long time.

I own several mountain hardware pieces of clothing, and they always fit great, work well, do what I need and take what I give. Aside from the color, I really like the jacket.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote an answer about on October 13, 2010

This is probably too late for BrayD, but I'd go with the large. I'm nearly the same size and shape (6'3", 190#, long arms), and have massive trouble with sleeve and torso length. As it turns out, Large fits me really well. In fact, the sleeves are very long, I have great torso coverage, and if anything, the chest and shoulders are a bit loose. I won't have any trouble fitting some layers underneath.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on October 12, 2010

3 5

I can't comment on how well it works, but it seemed like it was made well. I bought it on SAC, tried it on, and sent it back.

I usually have a hard time getting things that fit well. I'm 6'3", 190lbs, and athletic but not bulky. I bought the large but everything was way too short. The torso hardly went down to my waist, and if I lifted my arms, the jacket would lift and expose my belly. The sleeves were too short as well, by a long shot. I couldn't have gone up to an XL because the torso girth and shoulder width was perfect, and anything larger would have been too baggy.

I prefer my clothing to be fitted, and with a hard shell like this, I want enough room to layer a down sweater underneath, which this was perfect for. If you are average hight and prefer fitted clothing, this is the fit for you, but for tall and thin, it just won't cut it.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on October 12, 2010

4 5

This is a HUGE knife. Although its got a bunch of neat-o stuff in it, I'm a bit unsure about it. Its typical Victorinox quality (which happens to be fantastic), and has tons of little ingenious things about it. When I first got it, I thought "When the heck am I ever going to use this little thingy," but as it turns out, I've used every tool in bunch, and been thankful I had it. The pen is handy, the straight pin is good for splinters, hook for tying knots with cold fingers, chisel for carving, reamer/leather sewing thingy for punching holes into just about anything including sheet metal (incidentally, I've never used it for sewing), and the list goes on and on. But the only issue about these are the pliers. Yeah, sure, they are useful and all, but they just aren't heavy duty enough to do any real around the house/shop work, and they make the knife so stinking big. Although they are GREAT for pulling hooks out of a fish, they just don't cut it compared to a Leatherman.

If you want a do everything tool, this is a good knife. I had mine for ten or fifteen years, and it was always handy and I loved it. However, when I lost it, I ended up getting a Champion Plus which is nearly the same but without the pliers. And although it doesn't have the pliers, I actually love it much much more. It fits in my hand better, it fits my pockets better, and it fits my pack better. And the pliers? Well, I don't really miss them much.

Like I said, if you need pliers, go with a Leatherman. If you don't need pliers, go with the Champion Plus (its also 1/3 the price!). If you want it all, then this is the closest thing you'll get, but you just won't get it all with this one.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on July 20, 2010

2 5

I'm a commuter, weekend rider, and occasional competitor, and I use both my road and mountain bikes for all of these on a regular basis. I chose these pedals for their reported comfort with both cleated and flat shoes, and I chose the PD-A530 on my road bike for the same reason. I only have one pair of cycling shoes, so I wanted the same cleats on both, and all the pedals had to be comfortable with flats.

Although I love the PD-A530's, I'm really disappointed with the PD-M647. I forked up big money on these nice pedals for my new titanium XC hardtail, thinking they need to be good with flats and light weight to match the rest of the bike, so these are my only option by Shimano. As it turns out, they aren't really much more comfortable than normal cage-less SPDs, which makes me wonder if I should have even gone with these at all. Secondly, there's an obnoxious creeking sound coming on every pedal stroke, which drives me totally nuts (reported by another reviewer also), and although the cage hasn't cracked, some other plastic part on the spindle has cracked on both pedals. All these combined, I ask myself why I keep these every time I go on a ride. For a similar amount of comfort, I could have paid half the price and saved half the weight with a pair of Crank Bro's Candies or even Shimano cage-less pedals, and been far more satisfied with the end result.

I guess these pedals do have two things going for them: 1. If you miss the clip you have a bit of platform to pedal with until you get a chance to clip in. 2. They apparently make good, lightweight downhill pedals (but I don't downhill, so thats no help for me).

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on June 8, 2010

4 5

I'm pretty upset that these shrink so much because they are so soft and comfortable. I can't comment too much on their moisture wicking ability or the magical bamboo fibers, but I would really love these if they didn't shrink so much in the wash. I even followed washing instructions!

Even though I'm really bummed about these, I'm still giving them 4 stars because I like them anyway. I would suggest getting a size larger, and if they don't shrink down enough, wash in hot water, and maybe even throw it in the dryer.

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Joe L.-S.

Joe L.-S. wrote a review of on January 13, 2010

5 5

hey guys, this tool is great. short of a cresent wrench and a tire lever, this tool has everything I can think of that you'd need. It is comprehensive enough for a 500 mile tour of the California coast if you are into touring, but small enough to fit in your backpack if you are a commuter. When I go on a sunday morning ride, I even throw it in my back pocket and don't ever notice it. I've used just about all the tools on there, and they all work fine.

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