Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind

Chugach Mountains; Eklutna Canyon; Seward Highway; Hatcher Pass

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Jesse's Passions

Camping
Backpacking
Trail Running
Hiking
Mountain Biking
Road Cycling
Snowshoeing
Ice Climbing
Alpine Skiing
Sport Climbing
Bouldering
Alpine Touring

Jesse's Bio

I live in the most beautiful place on God's green earth: Alaska. I ski, ice climb, rock climb, mountain bike, road bike, run, hike, backpack--and pretty much anything else that is outdoors.

Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on October 28, 2010

Doubtful. I checked Grivel's website and couldn't get an exact rating, but it does mention that the pick is thinner for placement in more fragile ice. So I'm guessing it's B-rated. Besides, this tool is designed more for ice than mixed, according to the backcountry.com description above. Hope this helps.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on October 28, 2010

I use semiautomatic all year round. I use Grivel G12s (new-matic) for mountaineering and glacier travel and Grivel G14s (new-matic) for ice climbing. Semi-auto crampons, when sized properly, are absolutely solid on the boot. In fact, if the front wire bail on a step-in crampon offers a potential failure point as it must remain in the front toe welt or the crampon will be loose. Not so with a semi-auto crampon. I suppose if all my technical boots had toe and heel welts, I could get away with step-ins. But I use La Sportiva Spantiks in winter and La Sportiva Trangos in the summer. The Trango doesn't have a toe welt.

As for your cyborg question...alpine and technical routes would be great, but for general mountaineering, I'd use a general mountaineering crampon like the sabretooth or the Grivel G12. Hope this helps.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on October 28, 2010

I haven't used the Millet, but I have the Predator 50 and LOVE it to death. It is the greatest pack I have ever owned. What specific features are you looking for in a pack? What will your primary use and environment be? Time of year? Type of travel (vertical, horizontal, etc.). Anyways, let me know and I'll give you info on how the predator matches up (or doesn't match up) to what you're planning on doing.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on September 28, 2010

Sure...you can fit your packing list into one of these bags. The duration of your trip using this pack will be determined by how efficient you pack and how light your equipment and supplies are. You asked a very subjective question. The standard category of packs that 65-70 liter packs fall into is generally week-long trips. Generally. Again, it depends on your systems you have in place.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on September 16, 2010

You'll have to bolt artificial rain gutter brackets to the sides of the roof. Tracks along top are another option. You'd use rain gutter towers with the brackets, and tracker II towers with tracks. And I don't recommend getting the aero bars. Just get the regular square ones. They are half the price, and you aren't limited in your accessory options as you are with the aero bars.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on September 10, 2010

Generally--I say again...generally--most Thule and Yakima racks when set up properly hold up to 165 lbs. However, adding that much weight to the roof of your vehicle radically changes the center of gravity and may cause extremely adverse reactions when braking and/or maneuvering at high speeds. You should always attempt to keep weight up top to a minimum. And make sure your canopy can actually support what you plan on carrying up there. And the 165 lb. number I threw out their refers to all four towers--not just one pair. Always check your vehicle and canopy owner's manual in regards to weight limits, and observe all installation weight limit guidelines when purchasing car rack components.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on September 10, 2010

If they are indeed artificial rain gutters in that they mimic the shape of rain gutters, they should work. But be advised that you may potentially void your Thule warranty if you use non-Thule artificial rain gutter brackets.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on September 10, 2010

The Hullraiser Aero will fit MOST factory bars. Certain factory crossbars like those found on the Nissan XTerra or the Toyota FJ Cruiser may not fit because they are ridiculously oversized. Check Yakima's website (www.yakima.com) to be absolutely certain for your vehicle. But in my experience (I sell car racks), I've never seen a fit issue with Subaru factory crossbars as long as you have the Aero version.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on September 1, 2010

Yes--assuming you have a rack on top. If you have a factory rack, though, you need to double check Thule's website (www.Thule.com) to ensure the brackets will be wide enough to fit over your crossbars. The brackets that come with this box are designed to fit round, square and most factory crossbars, but check the website just to be sure.

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Jesse Lind

Jesse Lind wrote an answer about on September 1, 2010

This is not the correct tower for a pop-up camper. You will need to use Yakima Control Towers and install either Yakima tracks or Yakima fixed mounting points (landing pads). The Yakima tracks use Yakima Landing Pad 1. Your choice of fixed mounting point really depends on what works with your configuration.

Another option is to install Yakima Widebody brackets on the side to simulate raingutters. Then, instead of Q Towers or Control Towers, you would use the 1A Raingutter towers. There are tall versions available (spacers, etc.) if you have a unique situation requiring you to mount the brackets lower than preferred.

Either way, your pop-up camper must offer a stable and secure bolting surface, lest your rack tear/shear completely off during a sudden deceleration or turn.

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