Hurry & Get It Before Labor Day Weekend—Order With Free 2-Day* by 5PM MT on 8/27
Jeff from Oregon

Jeff from Oregon

    New Feature

    Browse Your Followers or See Who You're Following

  • No Ranking

JEFFREY's Bio

Jeff from Oregon

Jeff from Oregon wrote a review of on February 7, 2012

5 5

I have three light weight jackets, the Montbell AlpineLite, Marmot Zeus half-zip, and a Patagonia Nanopuff pullover.
I wore each outside at several temperatures after sitting for about 30 minutes. I stood still for 10 minutes in each. I wore no gloves, hat, or shell, and Patagonia expedition weight top and bottom, and hiking boots as the only other insulation.
At 45f, all were adequate. The Nanopuff was only slightly warm, though it maintained the same warmth over time. The other two were both more than adequate. In a survival situation with this as your only insulation, any of these would have been acceptable, thought the Nano may not have been comfortable.
At 35f, the Nanopuff started out cool and became slightly cold after 10 minutes. Without a hat, gloves, and shell, 35f is beyond its sustained capability. IMO the Nanopuff is a good layering garment, but its ability to replace a normal jacket quickly becomes questionable.
With the 13.2oz Zeus at 35f, my hands and head were cold, but the jacket itself was adequately warm. Even without hat and gloves, one would survive at this temperature. Given a hat and gloves, the Zeus should be adequate if pressed to spend the night at freezing or slightly below. As the Zeus is only 3 ounces heavier than the Nanopuff, I see it as a far better general solution. It has DWR, a well-sealed neck closure and waist cinch, making it a far better solution in windy conditions as well.
At 35f, even though my head and hands were cold, the AlpineLite was very warm. Unlike the others though, the Montbell has both a hood and hand warmer pockets. With the hood and pockets in use, the AlpineLite is not at all challenged at 35f. I repeated this in the morning at 27f and again it was totally warm. While the AlpineLite is initially heavier at 15.7oz, for either of the others to approach its temperature ability, one needs to add a hat and gloves, if not a shell.

(2)

 

Jeff from Oregon

Jeff from Oregon wrote a review of on February 7, 2012

5 5

I have three light weight jackets, the Montbell AlpineLite, Marmot Zeus half-zip, and a Patagonia Nanopuff pullover.
I wore each outside at several temperatures after sitting for about 30 minutes. I stood around for 10 minutes in each. I wore no gloves, hat, or shell, and Patagonia expedition weight top and bottom, and hiking boots as the only insulation.
At 45f, all were adequate. The Nanopuff was only slightly warm, though it maintained the same warmth over time. The other two were both more than adequate. In a survival situation with this as your only insulation, any of these would have been acceptable, thought the Nano may not have been comfortable.
At 35f, the Nanopuff started out cool and became slightly cold after 10 minutes. Without a hat, gloves, and shell, 35f is beyond its sustained capability. IMO the Nanopuff is a good layering garment, but its ability to replace a normal jacket is lost at around 40f.
With the 13.2oz Zeus at 35f, my hands and head were cold, but the jacket itself was adequately warm. Even without hat and gloves, one would survive at this temperature. Given a hat and gloves, the Zeus should be adequate if pressed to spend the night at freezing or slightly below. As the Zeus is only 3 ounces heavier than the Nanopuff, I see it as a far better general solution. It has DWR, a well-sealed neck closure and waist cinch, making it a far better solution in windy conditions as well.
At 35f, even though my head and hands were cold, the AlpineLite was very warm. Unlike the others though, the Montbell has both a hood and hand warmer pockets. With the hood and pockets in use, the AlpineLite is not at all challenged at 35f. I repeated this in the morning at 27f and again it was totally warm. While the AlpineLite is initially heavier at 15.7oz, for either of the others to approach its temperature ability, one needs to add a hat and gloves, if not a shell.

(1)

 

0 Comments

Jeff from Oregon

Jeff from Oregon wrote a review of on December 26, 2009

4 5

This jacket is fit like a sweater as others have pointed out. If you have broad shoulders or a medium bust normal sizing will be at least a conforming fit. IMO order at least one size larger than normal.

The level of construction is very good and the materials are high quality as well. At the standard pricing it's rather spendy in terms of pure function. The natural/mushroom is a nice and stylish color combo.

(0)

 

0 Comments

Jeff from Oregon

Jeff from Oregon wrote a review of on February 21, 2007

5 5

The Precip shell is waterproof, fairly light, and quiet. The hood is well designed, as you would expect from a Marmot product at this price. The zip-out shell makes the combo serviceable to around 25*. I think this coat excels in the kind of cold and wet conditions common in the northwest. It keeps you dry and warm without a lot of fuss, and looks very nice doing so. It would also likely make a good choice for spring or fall camping where rain and moderately cool temps are expected.

(0)

 

0 Comments