Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay

Live in Los Alamos, NM but spend most of my free time in Colorado or areas of the southwest.

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Jason's Passions

Trad Climbing
Camping
Snowboarding
Trail Running
Road Cycling
Mountaineering
Sport Climbing

Jason's Bio

Trail runner, rock climber, canyoneer, hiker, mountain climber, snowboarder and internet addict.
I enjoy outdoor photography but don't take it too seriously so I don't have to carry extra lenses and such.
I appreciate great gear and consider myself 'in the [gear] loop' when it comes to equipment. http://jasonhalladay.blogspot.com

Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on October 23, 2012

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

You know the feeling when you put on piece of clothing and you know it's just right? That's the feeling I get with this piece. I love this jacket. Trim/athletic fit, good length sleeves, warm and cozy. As for sizing, I'm 6'5", 180lbs and the XL fits great. Sleeve length is just right, body/chest isn't too big and hood fits well.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on November 25, 2011

5 5

"It's too heavy on my head", "I sweat too much when I wear it", "It feels awkward while wearing it." These used to be my excuses for not wearing a helmet while sport climbing. The BD Tracer no longer allows me to use these excuses and, thus, I find myself wearing my helmet nearly all the time now. This is good. It's lightweight, well ventilated and fits snugly on my head. It hasn't slid back or sideways while on my head so I don't end up looking like that cockeyed-helmet-n00b guy we've all seen at the crag. :-)
I always wear my helmet while alpine or multi-pitch climbing but tended to leave the helmet at home for sport climbing. When I realized this is a flawed line of thought, I went looking for a lightweight helmet I'd want to wear all the time. Friends have the Petzl Meteor III and I found that to look bulky. The BD Tracer felt slimmer while still offering enough cranial protection for my tastes. Many days of climbing with the helmet have solidified this helmet as my new favorite and I'm wearing a helmet nearly 100 percent of the time now.
Regarding the size, I've been wearing a Petzl Elios size 2 and purchased the BD Tracer in size medium. With the medium, I've got a little bit of adjustability on each end of the adjustment dial so I can put on a skull cap underneath the helmet on those chilly days.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on May 12, 2011

5 5

This biner is great for belaying with a tube style belay device like an ATC. It stays orientated perfectly and keeps the biner from turning sideways and crossloading. If you use a Grigri for belaying you don't need this biner...it's been my experience that when using a Grigri the biner just doesn't move around that much, if at all. But this is great for use with an ATC.
It did take a little getting use to being efficient with taking the biner off the belay loop and getting back on but the flange on the inside the gate makes it easy to get the biner situated on the belay loop properly by acting like a one-way opening gate. Just tug the belay loop against the flange and it snaps open and then closed. Feed the rope through the ATC and biner and lock it up.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on May 12, 2011

4 5

This isn't a complete review because I've only climbed six pitches in the Supermoccs but I wanted to give my impression and a note on sizing. I've climbed for years in the original moccasyms and the supermoccs feel identical on my feet. It's a feel I like. I wear a size 13 street shoe and for most of my climbing shoes I size down to 12.5. But for the moccasyms, I've always gone with a full size down (12s) because they do stretch quite a bit over time. I was thinking with the new rubber toe cap on the supermoccs they might stretch less so I went down only a half size from my street shoe size, down to a 12.5. The fit prior to climbing in them was tight and slightly uncomfortable but bearable. After six pitches, though, they already feel quite a bit looser so I'm returning these to go down a full size to a 12. I think that will be perfect and my track record with the original moccasyms backs up my reasoning.

Based on the few pitches I have climbed in them, I expect these to be very similar to the original moccasyms with average edging but great for crack climbing and slabbin'.

EDIT: A month or two later and I found the super thin Mystique rubber wore out super fast forcing me to have a rand replacement done during the first resoling. Love the rubber but really think 5.10 skimped on the thickness for sure.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on September 22, 2010

5 5

I've had many different rope bags over the past 12 years and keep coming back to my Superslackers. The rope tarp size is generous, rolling the rope into the burrito style shape is easy, the compression straps on the outside work easily and, contrary to a few others here, I really like the zipper. I will admit I've had the barrel clasps on the end cinches break but they're easily replaced for cheap. And, to be fair, I use this rope bag more than any of my others; multiple times a week.
My climbing pack is an Osprey pack so the elongated shape of this rope bag allows me to strap it vertically to the compression straps common on Osprey packs. This just works really well for me.
I've used this rope bag for 60m x 10.5mm ropes as well as 70m x 9.8mm ropes and never feel like I'm squeezing the ropes in there. The volume of this bag is very good.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on September 22, 2010

4 5

This rope bag is solid and well designed. The rope tarp is huge, the red and green colored tie loops on the tarp make it clear which end is flaked for the lead and the compression straps on the outside hook easily into the loops and cinch nicely.
That said, I'm still more of a fan of my BD Superslacker rope bag because of the elongated shape; I carry my rope/ropebag strapped to my back pack and the elongated size is better suited for my preference.
But if you're a "carry the rope bag over your shoulder using the shoulder strap" kinda person, you'll love this bag. I use this bag for a 70m x 9.8mm rope and it fits it well. A beefier 70m rope might be tight and/or end up with a unwieldy shaped packed bag.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on December 1, 2008

5 5

I'm 6'5" with long arms so finding a jacket that fits me well is always a challenge. When looking for a lightweight, synthetic insulation jacket, I tried on the Patagonia Micro Puff Hooded jacket, the Cloudveil Enclosure Hooded jacket and the Mountain Hardwear Compressor hooded jacket. The Compressor had the best sleeve length (generous length with velcro closure at the wrist.) I bought an XL. The other jacket's XL versions fit OK in the sleeves but the chest and body was huge. This jacket has a much more athletic cut but still isn't restricting.
The two-way zipper and bungee cord cinch around the waist are easy to use and very functional. The jacket does not come with a stuff sack but I have found I can stuff it into the internal pocket (it doesn't zip shut but stays compressed and contained in the pocket well enough) and stick it in my pack.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on November 18, 2008

4 5

All day comfort, great crack jamming and good all around performance make this a very nice shoe for those long routes or seriously demanding cracks. They are quite narrow and have ridiculously long laces (had to cut mine short). I have a narrow foot (borderline AA) and this fit like a glove in the width department. I could have sized them a half size smaller for a better fit around the toes but it's still workable. I wear a size 13 street shoe and typically wear 12.5 in Five Ten shoes so I went with a 12.5 on these. A 12 would have been better and not painful as I did notice a small amount of stretch or eventual form fitting to my foot. The toe box area has some extra space above the middle toes area which I appreciate as I have long second toe and this shoe gives it room to scrunch up into.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on June 9, 2008

4 5

I switched to the Eco Ball initially because I liked the idea of having dry hands but not marking up the rock. It's great for that but even better, I found it does a much better job of drying my hands and not caking onto to my fingers like normal loose chalk or a standard chalk ball. I now have a hard time climbing with normal chalk as my hands never feel as dry and clean as they do when I use the Eco Ball.
The only downside to the Eco Ball is that it seems to deplete faster than a standard chalk ball. But that's certainly not enough to keep me from buying Eco Ball after Eco Ball.
I've had a good number of these balls explode in my chalk bag. I think Metolius has attempted to fix this by stuffing them with less material and I hope that does fix the issue.

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on April 17, 2008

5 5

To be honest, I was skeptical about this pack. The super light weight for a 5000+cu. in. pack seemed too good to be true. Thankfully, I've been pleasantly surprised. I'm 6'5" with a ~21 inch torso and this pack fits me well. I've used it for winter mountaineering/backpacking and a three-week mountaineering trip in India and it both cases it performed flawlessly. I will admit that with loads of more than 45lbs, I did start to feel a bit of discomfort in the shoulders and hips but I'm happy to take that given the light weight of the pack. It's a good trade off.
The stretchy ice ax attachment loop at the top work well but can be a bit difficult to undo at first when wearing gloves but after a bit of practice, it's not bad. The top lid is easy to adjust and holds a great deal of stuff. The pocket on the front of the pack is also more voluminous than it first appears.
But what I love the most about this pack is the clips on the bottom that allow you to minimize the size of the pack and use it as a day pack. This works very well and when I wore the pack as a day pack it didn't feel like a big, floppy, under-filled backpack. The width of the pack is narrow enough that when climbing or scrambling with it, my elbows don't bump on it and I hardly notice it's there.
I would definitely recommend this pack to friends. GoLite has done a great job with it!

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Jason Halladay

Jason Halladay wrote a review of on December 31, 2007

3 5

I have a good guess at what you're thinking. You want to know what it's like to fall on an 8mm double rope like this one. I own these ropes but can't answer that question because, quite frankly, I'm a bit scared to fall on one of these. I've been climbing with a pair of these for a few months now but have always clipped them both treating them as twin ropes because the thought of my 180lb frame falling on one of these clipped separately makes me wince and I actually don't fear falling normally. What I do really like about them, though, is the weight and the feel. They flow like a hot knife through perlon in my ATC-Guide device in autoblock mode yet autolock just fine if the second weights the rope. However, because of the small size, I think, they do have a tendency to loop on themselves while feeding slack from the flaked stack which does get annoying. Bottomline: If you're planning to get a set to treat as light twin ropes, these are quite nice. But I'm still quite a bit leery of the massive stretch they're sure to produce when fallen-upon while being clipped separately.

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